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We look forward to seeing you this September at &Now: Points of Convergence!
Registration is now open. Please visit Ticketspice to reserve your pass and order boxed lunches.
Complete conference details, including travel, accessibility, and technology information, can be found at the conference website: andnowfestival.com.
General Inquiries: andnowfestival2019@gmail.com.
Registration questions: iasinfo@uw.edu.


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Thursday, September 19
 

3:00pm

Registration and Bookfair Drop Off
Conference registration will be held on the balcony of North Creek Event Center.

Participants may drop by to pick up their registration packets and to drop off copies of their books for the bookfair with Billie Swift of Open Books.

Registration will be open up until the evening keynote.

Speakers
BS

Billie Swift

Open Books: A Poem Emporium


Thursday September 19, 2019 3:00pm - 7:00pm
North Creek Events Center 18325 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

7:00pm

Keynote Performance by LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs
Keynote book sales begin at 6:30 and extend into the reception.

A writer, vocalist and sound artist, LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs is the author of TwERK (Belladonna, 2013). Her interdisciplinary work has been featured at the Brooklyn Museum, the Poesiefestival in Berlin, Museum of Modern Art, the QOW conference in Slovakia, the International Poetry Festival in Bucharest,  the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Walker Art Center, the 56th Venice Biennale and Beijing.  As a curator and director, she has staged events at BAM Café, Lincoln Center Out of Doors, The David Rubenstein Atrium, The Highline, Poets House and El Museo del Barrio. LaTasha is the recipient of numerous awards; of them include New York Foundation for the Arts, Barbara Deming Memorial Grant, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Jerome Foundation Travel and Study Grant, the Japan-US Friendship Commission, Creative Capital and the Whiting Foundation Literary Award. She lives in Harlem.

Thursday September 19, 2019 7:00pm - 8:00pm
North Creek Events Center 18325 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:00pm

Opening Reception
Please join us for a reception sponsored by the University of Washington Simpson Center for the Humanities.

Thursday September 19, 2019 8:00pm - 10:00pm
North Creek Events Center 18325 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011
 
Friday, September 20
 

8:30am

8:30am

Registration
The registration table will be available in North Creek Event Center. Come and pick up your program, badge, and other materials.

If you are arriving for the 5pm keynote, registration will be available at 4:45pm in Mobius Hall.

Friday September 20, 2019 8:30am - 4:00pm
North Creek Events Center 18325 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

A Collaboration of Amateurs
A collaboration of amateurs is a collaboratively-authored cento composed of language lifted from texts encountered in our spring, 2019 writing workshop and then gifted to the group in a gesture of shelter, protection, and love. Inspired by Barbara Browning's The Gift, we approached this collaboration in the spirit of amateurism: we selected language that inspired us and transmuted it into a new medium, one in which we are dabblers, newcomers, and passionate neophytes. We embraced the idea of inappropriate intimacy in gathering these materials and in stitching them together into an intimate artifact. This is a gift we give one another as a record of the places we have gone as individuals and as a class in BCWRIT 501, Between Fact and Imagination, Spring 2019.
It reflects our immersion in the following texts:
  • Jordan Abel, Injun (Talonbooks, 2016)
  • Barbara Browning, The Gift (Coffee House Press, 2017)
  • Julie Carr, Real Life: An Installation (Omnidawn, 2018)
  • Diana Khoi Nguyen, Ghost Of (Omnidawn, 2018)
  • Jena Osman, Public Figures (Wesleyan UP, 2014)
  • Khadijah Queen, I’m so Fine (YesYes Books, 2017)
  • Cecilia Vicuña, Spit Temple (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2012)




Friday September 20, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
Mobius Art Gallery 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

Blue Monologue
“One feels his two-ness, —an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.” –W. E. B. DuBois, “Striving of the Negro People.”

Blue Monologue is a video triptych. In it, an “American” and a “Negro” dispassionately observe a third, centered, figure. The outermost two are differentiated only by their apparel—one dressed as a lay person, the other in an ambiguous blue uniform.

Both attempt to “place” the center figure, also in uniform, who grooves soulfully to inaudible music. Together, they consider: is she insufficiently identifying as “blue” (American) by over identifying as black? Or does the blue uniform thwart her claim on the darker color?

Although alone in her unadorned room, the center figure moves self-consciously into and out of the frame, seemingly captured by the unrelenting double gaze. By dancing, she investigates her sovereignty—as a diasporic black woman and an American—while the adjacent two look on, their frames spliced intermittently with inter-titles, chronicling and scrutinizing every facet of her form.

Throughout, all three figures are illuminated by a television’s blue light. The blinking glow reminds the audience of a network of audiences; those two adjacent surveyors are now, also, subjects of surveillance.

In image, movement, and text, Blue Monologue asks: how do we “feel [her] two-ness”? Or rather, how do we use intersections of race, gender, class, and nationality to better see one another without reinforcing prisons of identity?

Speakers
JS

Jo Stewart

Jo Stewart is a movement-theater artist, poet, and educator. She uses a combination of gesture, voice, and improvisational scores to make work that meets notions of blackness with queered mythologies. She has previously been an artist in residence at Azule (2019), the Old American... Read More →
LE

Lyndsay Ellis Bloom

Lyndsay Ellis Bloom (b. Florida, USA) is a filmmaker and artist working in experimental cinema and film installation. Bloom’s process involves putting media archeology into practice, investigating the physical properties of celluloid film, and considering intersections between the... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
DISC-165B 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

Breathe the Machine
The FaaS were future-oriented. Every day, they contemplated the question: what kind of ancestor will you be?

Prose writer Teresa Carmody, new media artist Matt Roberts, 3-D animator Dengke Chen, and poet Terri Witek will repurpose computers in an existing Bothell lab to respond to human breath. Each transformation will become part of a larger story built from the computers’ individual data--every breath will both create an onscreen reaction (individual computers) and change an animated world just to one side of our own (projected on large screen/wall) . Participants will move from computer to computer and breath by breath build a world that unfolds on the room’s large screen. Simple biological actions, then, will momentarily converge human and mechanical worlds.

Their conceiving mind quit avoiding their body; their body, they realized, had already FaaD.

Donna Haraway is just one theorist who argues that as we acquire more mechanical parts, and as technology takes on increasingly human functions, we should become more actively hopeful about interspecies interactions. Breathe the Machine challenges us to think of even anonymous, institutionally controlled screens as partners in new, combinatory narratives that converge technology and the human into non-hostile, resilient allies. A computer lab, then, becomes an interactive installation, an archive, a fiction, a world and a landscape. A prompt.

This is how we morph.

Speakers
TC

Teresa Carmody

Teresa Carmody is the author of Maison Femme: a fiction (2015) and Requiem (2005). Her work has appeared in The Collagist, Big Fiction, Two Serious Ladies, St. Petersburg Review, Faultline, Entropy, and more. Carmody is co-founding editor of Les Figues Press, an imprint of LARB Books... Read More →
DC

Dengke Chen

Dengke Chen is currently Assistant Professor of Digital Arts, Stetson University, Florida. His practice concentrates on new media art, 3D animation, computer games, and comic art. Unlike the single narrative storytelling techniques used in traditional animations to amuse and entertain... Read More →
MR

Matt Roberts

Associate Professor of Digital Art, Stetson Univeristy
Matt Roberts is a new media artist whose work has been featured internationally and nationally, including shows in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Italy, Mexico, Portugal, Scotland, Taiwan, and nationally in New York, San Francisco, Miami, and Chicago. His work has been featured... Read More →
avatar for Terri Witek

Terri Witek

Terri Witek is the author of 6 books of poems, most recently The Rape Kit (2018), winner of the Slope Editions Prize judged by Dawn Lundy Martin. She has collaborated with visual artists throughout her career: works with Brazilian visual artist Cyriaco Lopes include gallery shows... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
UW2-121 Digital Media Lab 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

CURB (an artists' book by Divya Victor, printed and bound by Aaron Cohick)
Throughout the conference (and in conjunction with a panel featuring performance, critical talks, and discussions of the book) we would like to exhibit copies of CURB by Divya Victor. Produced by Aaron Cohick of The Press at Colorado College, CURB is an artists’ book made through the convergence between documentary poetics and the possibilities of structure and legibility in the handmade book. The binding is a double-sided accordion-fold spine, with sewn-in chapbooks and fold-outs. The printing incorporates a traditional, carefully crafted approach to typography and letterpress printing; a complete reversal of those traditions through repetitive overprinting; and direct rubbings made from sidewalks and curbs, imprinting the pages with a textural trace of concrete.

The book explores how racial and national identities diverge, rupture, and converge in the threshold zones of semi-public spaces—sidewalks, verges, lawns—and in places of quotidian consumption—gas stations, bars, green spaces—which it understands as sites of discipline and surveillance. CURB documents the killing and assault of Indian-Americans and Indian immigrants in post Reagan America through to the Trump era to query how urban spaces defend against the foreign subject so as to mark and claim a pending corpse or carceral entity.

Making copies of the book available for attendees to interact with would allow them to explore the author and book artist’s engagement with how we imagine ourselves as converging and diverging in shared, public spaces. How does “nationhood,” as a production, attempt to manage, curb, or fetishize ongoing cultural convergence through acts of violence? How do these acts unfold in shared public spaces? How might a book’s architecture and facture open multiple layers of reading, challenge oppressive habits of textual engagement and sense-making, and welcome collaboration and convergent peership through reading practices and physical engagement with the book?

Speakers
AC

Aaron Cohick

Aaron Cohick is a letterpress printer/artist/publisher based in Colorado Springs, CO. His work focuses on the intersection of experimental typography/printing, writing, and artists’ publications. He is the founder and proprietor of the NewLights Press and is the Printer of The Press... Read More →
avatar for Divya Victor

Divya Victor

Asst. Prof., Nanyang Technological University
Divya Victor is the author of CURB (Press at Colorado College), KITH (Fence Books/ Book Thug), a book of verse, prose memoir, lyric essay and visual objects; NATURAL SUBJECTS (Trembling Pillow, Winner of the Bob Kaufman Award), UNSUB (Insert Blanc), and THINGS TO DO WITH YOUR MOUTH... Read More →
avatar for CJ Martin

CJ Martin

CJ Martin lives in Colorado Springs, Colorado and is a poet, bookbinder, letterpress printer and sometimes a publicist. He is the author of Two Books (Compline Press, 2010) as well as numerous chapbooks. With Julia Drescher, he publishes poetry and art titles from Further Other Book... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
Mobius Art Gallery 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

Home is a Flame Surrounded
“Foul Chutes” is an immersive exhibit. The text of the piece is an essay displayed on a 50ft scroll suspended vertically on fishing line, in the shape of a spiral. The text itself is designed in the concrete shape of the Mississippi River, seen from above. When a reader walks to the center of the spiral, they find a pitcher and a water basin, containing water from the Mississippi River.

The two parallel “strands” of text trace the history of the Mississippi River Basin by tracing its trash—the evidence of those who have lived alongside the river, and reveals that the history of river trash is a history of violence. The essay also traces a friendship between two women, and the trip they take to explore an abandoned “Mississippi River Model,” a concrete scale-model left to decay in Buddy Butts park outside Jackson, MS.

“Foul Chutes” is part of a genre of installed texts that aim to interrupt traditional modes of spending time with art by inviting an audience to participate in meaning-making through fragments, visuals, and movement. “Foul Chutes” invites readers and lookers alike to consider how the shape a text takes on can dictate the stories it is allowed to deliver. This essay was first exhibited as part of a week-long exhibit of visual essays at the Trissolini Gallery in Athens, OH.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Minor

Sarah Minor

Assistant Professor of Creative Writing, Cleveland Institute of Art
Sarah Minor is the author of The Persistence of The Bonyleg: Annotated (Essay Press, 2016) and a collection of visual essays forthcoming from Rescue Press (2020). She has exhibited installations of essays at The University of Arizona Historical Society in Tucson, AZ (2014), Blue Mark... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
Mobius Art Gallery 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

The Ambrose J and Vivian T Seagrave Museum of 20th Century Art
The Ambrose J and Vivian T Seagrave Museum of 20th Century Art (Acre Books/University of Cincinnati Press, 2019) is a novel told mostly in the form of exhibit labels for art in a fictional museum. As an experiment in formal appropriation and constraint, the novel explores the convergence of art, museum, and narrative through the limit of the exhibit label. The ekphrastic novel interrogates the relationship between curator, museum, art, visitor, and narrative through descriptions written by an increasingly unstable curator. Juxtaposed with the narrative of a museum visitor with a personal connection to the displayed art, the novel provides multiple, often oppositional, perspectives on the role of the museum, collective and individual memory, and how value is assigned to artwork.

In 2020, the University of Cincinnati College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning will host an exhibit of art created from the labels in the novel by artists commissioned for the project. At &Now, I will create a companion exhibit by displaying labels from the novel alone on a blank wall. By presenting the label on a blank wall, the exhibit inverts the traditional experience of the museum. Rather than making meaning of art via its supplemental information, the exhibit asks viewers to imagine art using only a description of its materials and prescribed meaning.

Speakers
MK

Matt Kirkpatrick

Matthew Kirkpatrick is the author of The Ambrose J. and Vivian T. Seagrave Museum of 20th Century American Art (Acre Books), The Exiles (Ricochet Editions), and Light Without Heat (FC2). His fiction and essays have appeared in The Rumpus, The Common, Puerto del Sol, Denver Quarterly... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
Mobius Art Gallery 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

The Mueller Report as Poetic Text
As of May 2019, U.S. democracy is wounded by our elected representatives’ and the public’s willful illiteracy in refusing to read the 448-page heavily redacted Mueller report, investigating Russian interference into the 2016 election, the installation of Donald Trump as President, Trump’s collaboration with Russian forces, and his ensuing obstruction of the investigations. The people of this country are represented by a complicit party and a complacent party, both content to let the facts of an illegitimate president’s rise and continued corruption go the way of other outmoded literary technologies, with the actual report getting little more actual reading attention than even small press poetry publications.

The spin campaign of tweets and short statements that directly contradict and obfuscate the facts of the report have thus far triumphed in capturing the daily news cycle “narrative,” which favors flash over boredom, broadness over nuance. The Mueller report, and Mueller himself, lack the sound-bite snap necessary to sway public opinion. As William Carlos Williams predicted, “It is difficult to get the news from poems / yet men die miserable every day / for lack / of what is found there.”

Months after its release, the substantive report remains largely unread, like a required book on a student reading list, yet not like that at all. Our project--a filmed reading of the full report by poets and writers--acknowledges the literary value of the political text and the power of speech. Recognizing that real world politics may change by the time of "&Now" in September 2019, we welcome the altered meanings a shifting context will provide in our gallery presentation of the video, with 2-3 minute filmed readings of the report by over 100 luminous contemporary writers and friends of 1913 Press, giving voice to the most important literary document of our time.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Doller

Ben Doller

Assistant Professor, UCSD, Designer/Vice Editor, 1913, etcetera
Ben Doller’s most recent book of poems is Fauxhawk (Wesleyan University Press). Together with the writer Sandra Doller, he wrote the collaborative memoir, The Yesterday Project (Sidebrow Books). He is Associate Professor in the Literature Department at University of California... Read More →
SD

Sandra Doller

Sandra Doller's most recent book is Leave Your Body Behind (Les Figues Press). Together with the poet Ben Doller, she wrote the collaborative anti-memoir, The Yesterday Project (Sidebrow Books). She is an Associate Professor of Literature & Writing and Film Studies at California State... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
Mobius Art Gallery 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

The Museum of Alternative History Pop-Up Exhibit
Speakers
avatar for Tim Guthrie

Tim Guthrie

Professor, Creighton University
Tim Guthrie is an Omaha-based multi-media visual artist and experimental filmmaker. His work has been awarded Independent Artist Fellowships in 2011, 2008, 2007 and 2006 (Distinguished Artist, Filmmaker) from the Nebraska Arts Council for both his traditional and digital art, experimental... Read More →
AO

Andi Olsen

Andi Olsen is a video, assemblage and collage artist whose works have been shown in museums, galleries and film festivals in the U.S. and Europe. She is known for her hybrid works that combine literature, video and objects. More at www.andiolsen.com.
DS

Davis Schneiderman

Provost and Dean of the Faculty / Lake Forest College, Lake Forest College
Davis Schneiderman is Krebs Provost and Dean of the Faculty, and Professor of English at Lake Forest College. He is the author or editor of more than 10 books. His first short-story collection, there is no appropriate #emoji, will be released in Fall 2019, and his recent novels BLANK... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
Mobius Hall Foyer 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

Visualizing & Performing Poetry
My early fall class is an intensive workshop style course intended to challenge students to create a sense of experimentation and transformation with their existing written works. The course integrates attendance and participation at the "&Now" Conference as essential to the coursework and we will additionally study the works of the keynote speakers in advance of the conference. An exhibition of the student works will be included in the "&Now" program. Below is a description of the course.

Description:
BISIA 330: Visualizing and Performing Poetry
In what ways can we imagine language to perform for us beyond the page? How can we literally and figuratively pull words and pages apart to create something new where language leaps from our books and bodies? This is an advance Interdisciplinary Arts & Creative Writing class where students will create works rooted in writing but intended to be experienced as a performance or visual work of art (ie installation, film, textile/fiber art, book art and etc.) Students who enroll in this intensive workshop-based art class will come to the course with some existing writings (prose, poetry, song, etc). We will then workshop and discuss your writings, compositions and intentions. From there, you will work to further examine and transform your writings into a new performative or visual experimentation. Students will then have a chance to participate and present their final works at the “&Now” Festival of Innovative Writing hosted this year at UWBothell from Sept 19 – 21, 2019; Conference Theme: “Points of Convergence.” Our class integrates conference attendance as part of the required coursework.

Speakers
avatar for Anida Yoeu Ali

Anida Yoeu Ali

Artist-in-Residence, UWBothell
Anida Yoeu Ali is an artist whose works span performance, installation, new media, public encounters, and political agitation. She is a first generation Muslim Khmer woman born in Cambodia and raised in Chicago. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to artmaking, her installation... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
HH-1310 Gallery 10909 NE 185th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Breathe the Machine: An Introduction
The FaaS were future-oriented. Every day, they contemplated the question: what kind of ancestor will you be?

Prose writer Teresa Carmody, new media artist Matt Roberts, 3-D animator Dengke Chen, and poet Terri Witek will repurpose computers in an existing Bothell lab to respond to human breath. Each transformation will become part of a larger story built from the computers’ individual data--every breath will both create an onscreen reaction (individual computers) and change an animated world just to one side of our own (projected on large screen/wall) . Participants will move from computer to computer and breath by breath build a world that unfolds on the room’s large screen. Simple biological actions, then, will momentarily converge human and mechanical worlds.

Their conceiving mind quit avoiding their body; their body, they realized, had already FaaD.

Donna Haraway is just one theorist who argues that as we acquire more mechanical parts, and as technology takes on increasingly human functions, we should become more actively hopeful about interspecies interactions. Breathe the Machine challenges us to think of even anonymous, institutionally controlled screens as partners in new, combinatory narratives that converge technology and the human into non-hostile, resilient allies. A computer lab, then, becomes an interactive installation, an archive, a fiction, a world and a landscape. A prompt.

This is how we morph.

Speakers
TC

Teresa Carmody

Teresa Carmody is the author of Maison Femme: a fiction (2015) and Requiem (2005). Her work has appeared in The Collagist, Big Fiction, Two Serious Ladies, St. Petersburg Review, Faultline, Entropy, and more. Carmody is co-founding editor of Les Figues Press, an imprint of LARB Books... Read More →
DC

Dengke Chen

Dengke Chen is currently Assistant Professor of Digital Arts, Stetson University, Florida. His practice concentrates on new media art, 3D animation, computer games, and comic art. Unlike the single narrative storytelling techniques used in traditional animations to amuse and entertain... Read More →
MR

Matt Roberts

Associate Professor of Digital Art, Stetson Univeristy
Matt Roberts is a new media artist whose work has been featured internationally and nationally, including shows in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Italy, Mexico, Portugal, Scotland, Taiwan, and nationally in New York, San Francisco, Miami, and Chicago. His work has been featured... Read More →
avatar for Terri Witek

Terri Witek

Terri Witek is the author of 6 books of poems, most recently The Rape Kit (2018), winner of the Slope Editions Prize judged by Dawn Lundy Martin. She has collaborated with visual artists throughout her career: works with Brazilian visual artist Cyriaco Lopes include gallery shows... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 9:00am - 9:30am
UW2-121 Digital Media Lab 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

The Museum of Alternative History
“What is the point?” in the &NOW 2019 call for proposals presents a useful shorthand for the explorations of the Museum of Alternative History, a multimedia projects uniting differing visual art modalities with descriptively fake gallery text. The Museum is a critique of its place—embedded in a time of intense division—and a product of the discussions that inhabit the divisive space. First presented in smaller form at Omaha’s Ring Gallery in 2013, and in an expanded version in Omaha’s Kaneko Gallery in 2018, the award-winning exhibition included 33 established and emerging visual artists, seven writers, two editors, one graphic designer, and a single curator with the initial animating vision.

The Museum of Alternative History filters facts through biases. It explores the concepts of confirmation bias and cognitive dissonance in the structure of a natural history museum. This museum addresses fake, revised, and twisted versions of history, and serves as a response to how biased opinions can supplant systematic observation, measurement, verifiable experimentation, and hypotheses. It is about using facts—selectively— to make disingenuous arguments based on partisan opinions. It addresses the way personal beliefs can be forced onto others through culture. The Museum of Alternative History offers a selection of the fittest explanations for the nature of the world, universe, and alternate histories contrary to...well...history.

This panel is composed of the curator, the lead author, the graphic designer, and one of the 33 artists, for a presentation and discussion, focused on hybridity—in the practice of visual art paired with text outside of the artist’s “intent,” and in the experience of those visual-written pairs inhabited by the audience. MOAH is meant to be as disruptive as it is dissipative, to act on the viewer as a tornado acts upon a landscape viewed through a series of infinitely regressive screens.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Guthrie

Tim Guthrie

Professor, Creighton University
Tim Guthrie is an Omaha-based multi-media visual artist and experimental filmmaker. His work has been awarded Independent Artist Fellowships in 2011, 2008, 2007 and 2006 (Distinguished Artist, Filmmaker) from the Nebraska Arts Council for both his traditional and digital art, experimental... Read More →
AO

Andi Olsen

Andi Olsen is a video, assemblage and collage artist whose works have been shown in museums, galleries and film festivals in the U.S. and Europe. She is known for her hybrid works that combine literature, video and objects. More at www.andiolsen.com.
DS

Davis Schneiderman

Provost and Dean of the Faculty / Lake Forest College, Lake Forest College
Davis Schneiderman is Krebs Provost and Dean of the Faculty, and Professor of English at Lake Forest College. He is the author or editor of more than 10 books. His first short-story collection, there is no appropriate #emoji, will be released in Fall 2019, and his recent novels BLANK... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW1-030 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Excavating Trauma & Elevating Self-Care: A Cross-Genre Conversation on Convergence
This project explores innovative literary approaches to writing about trauma (emotional/physical/sexual/psychic/spiritual), as well as the strategies that help us thrive during the complex writing process, which includes sending pieces out that face rejection and a publication experience that enables strangers and family access and insight into the various projects. Audre Lorde illuminates, “In the cause of silence, each of us draws the face of her own fear- fear of contempt, of censure, or some judgment, or recognition, of challenge, of annihilation. But most of all, I think, we fear the visibility without which we cannot truly live.” How does writing through trauma change our visibility and explore accountability?  We will consider the larger structural institutions and systems that impact identity formation and what is safely sharable or representable, as well as the interpersonal dynamics that shape our sense of selves. Investigating the distinction between secrecy and privacy, this project is about the risk and precipice of writing through the unsaid. Panelists will reflect on topics ranging from assault and familial loss to racial and queer identities. Within this context, panelists will explore the desire for vulnerability and the process of self-editing as well as work that has influenced them. This conversation will generate a safe space to examine the complexity of emotional self-censorship and serve as a catalyst for activating linguistic agency and self-care.

Speakers
avatar for Serena Chopra

Serena Chopra

Assistant Faculty, Seattle University
Serena Chopra is a teacher, writer, dancer, filmmaker, soundscape designer and a visual and performance artist. She has a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Denver and an MFA from the University of Colorado at Boulder. She was a 2011-2013 Redline artist-in-residence, a... Read More →
avatar for Julia Cohen

Julia Cohen

Julia Cohen is the author of two books of poetry and one collection of hybrid essays.  Her work appears most recently in Juked, The Rumpus, Entropy, Heavy Feather Review, and BOMB. She is an Assistant Professor of English and Literature at Wright College.
LH

Lily Hoang

Lily Hoang is the author of five books, including A Bestiary (PEN USA Award Finalist and winner of the Cleveland State University Poetry Center’s Nonfiction Contest) and Changing (recipient of a PEN Open Books Award). She teaches in the MFA program at UC San Diego.
avatar for Sara Renee Marshall

Sara Renee Marshall

Sara Renee Marshall is a poet and essayist. She has a BA in Political Science and an MFA in Poetry from University of Colorado. She’ll soon have a PhD from University of Georgia. Her writing has appeared in several chapbooks and journals like OmniVerse, La Vague, Colorado Review... Read More →
JC

Joanna C. Valente

Joanna C. Valente is a human who lives in Brooklyn, New York. They are the author of Sirs & Madams, The Gods Are Dead, Marys of the Sea, Sexting Ghosts, Xenos, No(body) (forthcoming, 2019), and is the editor of A Shadow Map: Writing by Survivors of Sexual Assault. They received their... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
DISC-061 Auditorium 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

On the Intellectual & Sensuous
In a conversation between Aditi Machado and S. Yarberry, Machado describes how she felt faced with a false choice as she wrote her first book: to write either toward ideas with a dense impenetrability or toward an unrestrained emotion. How, she wondered, to be both intellectual and sensuous in the contemporary moment? This panel gathers together writers interested in Machado's terms "intellectual" and "sensuous," their overlap, and their collapse. Trained as poets but pursuing a variety of forms, these writers will share their experiences asking after the sensory quality of ideas and the investigative quality of emotions. Although inspired by Machado's observation about her own poetic investigation into the physical body's movement through a contemporary pastoral scene, the panelists offer a variety of angles: Corfman writes about the relationship of past trauma and future anxiety to gender identity in prose poems, asking how the feeling of doing a formerly prohibited gendered action surprises us in its specificity, or how a forgotten feeling is resurrected; Ralambo-Rajerison writes in lyric prose about the role of global anti-Blackness as it shapes intimate relationships of love, family, and friendship as well as more unidirectional attachments to media icons; and Yarberry's poetry thinks deeply about the physicality of any intimacy, how the loss of such intimacy is the loss of sensation as much as communication. Sharing work and reflecting on that work, this quartet will consider how the normative separation of these two terms can be productive as well as how their union can guide a investigatory poetics.

Speakers
SB

S. Brook Corfman

S. Brook Corfman is the author of Luxury, Blue Lace, chosen by Richard Siken for the Autumn House Rising Writer Prize, and two chapbooks. A second book, My Daily Actions, or The Meteorites, is forthcoming in 2020, chosen by Cathy Park Hong for the Fordham POL Prize.
GR

Gabrelle Rajerison

Gabrelle Rajerison writes about the possibility of Black love amidst global anti-Blackness; her poems have appeared in Kweli and Cosmonauts Avenue, and an excerpt from her book-length poem To What Do I Owe This Pleasure was featured as part of the University of Pittsburgh's Physics... Read More →
SY

S. Yarberry

S. Yarberry is a trans poet and writer. Their poetry has appeared in, or is forthcoming in, Tin House, Indiana Review, The Offing, Berkeley Poetry Review, jubilat, The Washington Post's The Lily Magazine, Notre Dame Review, miscellaneous zines, among others. Their other writings can... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW1-121 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

The Bear is at the Door, Knocking: The Absolute Need for Weird Fiction
How does one write into a society of corporate personhood and greed, climatological disaster, and the reemergence of nationalist hate groups? How do they write into a world that has grown more obscene with each rotation of the news cycle? In mainstream fiction, this has led to a massive rise in adoption of Magic Realism, Sci-Fi, and Fantasy, as the strange has stepped into the rift of horror that our reality has created. But these marvelous fictions have created their new worlds with the same rules of plot, character and storytelling. Avante Garde, Experimental, and Weird fiction, however, seeks to undermine the cultural mores of society by exploding form, deconstructing characterization, and fracturing the very bounds of language. With the bear at the door, these weird fictions challenge the reader to try something different, scary, and uncomfortable.

This panel will discuss how strange stories told in new ways can create new possibility spaces. How challenging conceptions of storytelling allows us to challenge the systems of the world.

Speakers
JA

Jessica Alexander

Jessica Alexander’s story collection, Dear Enemy, was the winning manuscript in the 2016 Subito Prose Contest, as judged by Selah Saterstrom. Her fiction has been published in journals such as Fence, The Collagist, and DIAGRAM. She lives in Louisiana where she teaches creative writing... Read More →
JD

Jason Daniels

Jason Daniels is the author of the novel, Mount Fugue (Kernpunkt Press 2016), and numerous stories, published in The Southeast Review, Notre Dame Review, and Juked, has an MFA from the University of Houston, and is currently a doctoral candidate at the University of Utah.
JG

Janalyn Guo

Janalyn Guo is the author of the short story collection Our Colony Beyond the City of Ruins (Subito, 2018), and her work has appeared in various literary journals, most recently in Indiana Review, The Collagist, and Denver Quarterly. She lives and writes in Salt Lake City where she... Read More →
EH

Eric Howerton

Teaching Assistant Professor/Interim Director of ENGL 3332 Tech Writing, Oklahoma State University
Currently a Teaching Assistant Professor at Oklahoma State University, Eric Howerton was raised in the Midwest and New Mexico. He studied at the University of New Mexico before earning his MFA from the Pennsylvania State University (Fiction) and PhD from the Creative Writing Program... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW1-040 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

The World in the Word: Diction as World-Building
The concept of world-building, or the creation of imaginary environments, is often associated with the construction of gigantic narrative structures, whether in prose, film, games, or other media. This panel looks at world-building at the microlevel: we’ll consider how word choice in poetry and fiction can assemble constellations of connotation and implicit context, in effect conjuring worlds within the phrase or line. In particular, how can the deployment of seemingly discordant or dissonant diction open up imaginary spaces of novel social possibility? In the neighborhood of our topic are such recent theoretical interventions as Fred Moten’s invocation of vernacular collision and Daniel Tiffany’s secret history of kitsch.

Speakers
JB

John Beer

John Beer is the author of Lucinda (2016) and The Waste Land and Other Poems (2010), and the editor of Poems (1962-1997) by Robert Lax (2013). He teaches creative writing at Portland State University.
avatar for Megan Kaminski

Megan Kaminski

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Megan Kaminski is a poet and essayist. She is the author of two books of poetry, Deep City (Noemi Press, 2015) and Desiring Map (Coconut Books, 2012), with a third book Gentlewomen forthcoming from Noemi Press (2020). She is an associate professor in the University of Kansas' Graduate... Read More →
RS

Rone Shavers

Rone Shavers is a writer who publishes in multiple genres. His fiction has appeared in ACM: Another Chicago Magazine, Identitytheory.com, Longform.org, Nth Word, PANK, The Operating System, and Thought Catalog, among other places. Shavers’ non-fiction essays and essay-length reviews... Read More →
avatar for Rodrigo Toscano

Rodrigo Toscano

Rodrigo Toscano's newest book of poetry is In Range (Counterpath Books, 2019). His previous books include, Deck of Deeds, Collapsible Poetics Theater (a National Poetry Series selection), To Leveling Swerve, Platform, Partisans, and The Disparities. Recent anthology appearance include... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
DISC-252 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Updating Bachelard: Toward a Digital Poetics of Space
This session will follow four artists and writers who have made the digital an integral part of their practice. In performance and discussion, they will explore what poetics means to our age when received notions of humanity are intermingling with artificial intelligence. They will also explore how themes of excess, now-ness, transmediation, flow, trauma, and personal accounting/personal accountability can be incorporated. Memes, emojis, algorithmic ads, public domain texts and other digital totems will also be examined—with Bachelard never far away. Everyone present will collaborate on a list of digital spaces like chat windows, private forums, and online profiles (fake/real) befitting a new poetics. The session will conclude with a Q&A. Participants will also respond to comments from the official @AndNow2019 Twitter handle.

Speakers
CB

Catherine Bresner

Catherine Bresner is the author of the chapbook The Merriam Webster Series; the artist book Everyday Eros (Mount Analogue, 2017); and the empty season, which won the Diode Edition Book Prize in 2017. Her poetry has appeared in The Offing, Heavy Feather Review, Gulf Coast, Poetry Northwest... Read More →
avatar for Chris Campanioni

Chris Campanioni

Chris Campanioni is a first-generation American, the son of immigrants from Cuba and Poland, and the author of the recently-published the Internet is for real (C&R Press, 2019), which re-enacts the language of the Internet as literary installations. He teaches at Baruch College and... Read More →
avatar for William Lessard

William Lessard

PR With Brains
William Lessard has writing that has appeared or is forthcoming in American Poetry Review, Best American Experimental Writing, McSweeney’s, BOOTH, Plume and Hyperallergic. His visual work has been featured at MoMA PS1 and is part of the special collection at Poet’s House. 
avatar for Nicole McCarthy

Nicole McCarthy

Nicole McCarthy earned her MFA from the University of Washington Bothell. Her work has appeared in The Offing, Redivider, Glass: a Journal of Poetry, The Shallow Ends, Ghost Proposal, Tinderbox Poetry, Civil Coping Mechanism's A Shadow Map anthology, and the 2018 Best American Experimental... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW1-050 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Writing and Embodiment
How can we train somatic attention to prepare and animate a writing practice? What convergences of form are helpful for carrying, activating and translating sensory awareness on the page? This exploratory workshop addresses the meeting point of writing and embodiment. We will use tools of focusing, movement and sensory work to support experimentation, generation and vulnerability with the written word. Participants will share examples of embodied writing and intentions for or reflections on their own embodied writing practice. An emphasis on practices of witnessing, listening and intuition, will guide us to consider relationships between history, language, lived experience and our individual and collective bodies. Participants are encouraged to bring examples of what they consider to be embodied writing, from their own work or from others', as well as any physical items they want to share that aid in their writing practice (for example: altar pieces, photos, candles, specific writing instruments or journals etc.).

Sign up by adding to your SCHED.

Speakers
NM

Naomi Macalalad Bragin

Naomi Macalalad Bragin is a streetdancer, performance artist and assistant professor at UW Bothell. Their writing has won awards from Drama Review, Congress on Research in Dance, and American Society for Theatre Research. Her book project Black Power of Hip-Hop Dance has received... Read More →
avatar for Jen Soriano

Jen Soriano

Jen Soriano (she/they) is a Filipinx-American writer and musician based in Seattle. She writes lyric essays and performance poetry about the intersections of trauma, health, science, politics, colonization, nature and power. They are the author of "Multiplicity From the Margins... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW2-021 Dance Studio 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

10:15am

Break
We encourage you to continue conversations begun during your panel while also clearing the space so that the next group of presenters may come in and begin setting up for their presentations.

You may wish to check out some of the exhibitions or to visit the book fair.

Friday September 20, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am

10:45am

Responding to Grief and Trauma
How can exploring grief and trauma through interdisciplinary forms of writing and art initiate healing? Four panelists discuss how they’ve created hybrid, cross-genre works to encounter pain and distress.  

Reinetta Vaneendenburg and Quintan Ana Wikswo will explore how interdisciplinary, hybrid form, collaborative, and other modalities of innovative writing surrounding the aftermath of conflict or endangerment impact literary process, practice, professional relationships, healing, reparations, and interrupt and trouble hegemonies of reality and narrative at conflict sites. In "Hybrid Writing by Front-line Responders: Invoking and Evoking Complex Experiences," Vaneendenburg and Wikswo will discuss how they’ve used innovative writing, cross genre and structure to document their physical/emotional trauma and experiences in military, geo-political, eco-contested, disaster sites, territories, and locations. They will lead a conversation on multiple modalities of experiential and experimental response possibilities for participants seeking practical as well as ethics, trauma informed, and healing centered strategy around writing within conflict and conscience sites will ensure an interactive session strong on unlikely allies and generative differences.

Death, both grand and small, is constant, filling our days with unspoken bereavement: over the shift in energy around us, a sudden absence of light, a misinterpretation of identity, a trigger of past trauma, a best friend’s overdose. As our nation scrambles in division, our losses multiply and we continuously focus on remediation and the prevention of further suffering. But, do we ever allow ourselves to be present with our grief, to love and understand it as an aspect of ourselves that will move with us into the future? Tracy Jane Gregory and Corbin Louis discuss their survival of addiction, mental illness, and trauma in "A Re(image)ing of Grief." They will examine the potential of hybrid art to clarify, redefine, and heal such cultural grief. In presenting a conversational lecture and highlighting their works, Suburban Kid Eulogy by Louis and Bondage by Gregory, they will investigate the ability of cross-genre art to engage and resolve manifestations of grief.

Speakers
avatar for Tracy Jane Gregory

Tracy Jane Gregory

English Tutor/Teacher's Assistant, City College of San Francisco
Tracy Jane Gregory is a cross-genre writer, multi-media artist, musician, and queer feminist. She is an editor at Letter [r] Press, a graduate of University of Washington-Bothell’s MFA program, and an English teacher’s assistant at City College of San Francisco. Her current project... Read More →
avatar for Corbin Louis

Corbin Louis

Corbin Louis is a poet and performer from Seattle. At age 13 Corbin found his voice in rap and spoken word. By 2008 he became the Seattle Youth Slam Champion in a citywide competition. He spent the next 15-years in a frenzied haze, recording albums and chopping up videos for the sake... Read More →
RV

Reinetta Van, Captain, US Navy (Retired)

Van explores issues such as identity and historical perspective in hybrid forms. She is documenting the transition of women in uniform from support to warfighter roles, drawing on her own and others military experiences. Van served as an analyst and historian during her thirty-plus... Read More →
avatar for Quintan Ana Wikswo

Quintan Ana Wikswo

Artist in Residence, Colin Powell Institute on Global Leadership at City College / Politics of Gender Violence Initiative
Hailed as “heady, euphoric, singular, surprising” by Publisher’s Weekly, “beautiful, horrifying, passionate, and bold,” by Jeff VanderMeer in The Millions, “Rilke’s lost female shadow,” by Conjunctions, and “universal and personal, comforting and jarring, ethereal... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW1-121 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Witnessing, Speculation, and Surveillance
Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint, "Writing What Remains Unknown: Mystery, Enigma & Silence in Post-Dicatorial Narratives"

Cathy Caruth asks in Unclaimed Experience: “What does it mean to transmit and to theorize around a crisis that is marked, not by a simple knowledge, but by the ways it simultaneously defies and demands our witness”?

At a time when knowledge and facts are increasingly being replaced in political discourse by beliefs and opinions, this presentation seeks to examine the complexity of bearing witness to truths that resist or exceed comprehension through judicial or journalistic language. As someone who was born in Burma/Myanmar during the dictatorship (which lasted nearly four decades, from 1962-2011), but grew up in the diaspora, I am especially interested in how the legacy of dictatorship—a legacy of violence, oppression, and paranoid—dismantles the workings of time, space, and the boundaries of the self. In this presentation, I will speak about my own work as well as work by other contemporary female writers such as Verónica Gerber Bicecci’s Empty Set (Coffee House Press, 2018) and María Negroni’s The Annunciation (Action Books, 2019), which attempt to language and narrativize the timeless, ubiquitous, and haunted event that is military dictatorship. How can a writer undertake the task of re-membering a past that is fractured, unofficial, or disappeared? How can one move beyond dualistic understandings of experience—victim versus oppressor, truth versus fiction, trauma versus normalcy? What does one do with the gaps between memory and history, between testimony and literature, and between the past and the present?

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Eldritch Priest, "Melodies, Moods and Holes: Wayward Thinking in the Zone of Exclusion"

I traveled to Chernobyl in June 2018 with a small group academics and artists to think about what dwelling in and passing through a “zone of exclusion” might entail, not in a metaphysical sense but also not not in a metaphysical sense. As I learned, thinking about The Zone is not a straight forward affair. On the one hand The Zone is exactly what you might think it is—a radioactive territory whose crumbling ruins and growing wildlife bear witness to the failure of the soviet nuclear dream. Yet on the other it’s also not what you think it is, like a hole is not the nothing it appears to be but a something that, strictly speaking, it isn’t. Because of this ontological uncertainty The Zone is not only something to wander in but something to be wondered about. And as such, it may be better dreamed than simply thought of.

Drawing on my zonal meanderings and a speculative form of acoustic ecology as well as employing a liberal dose of poetic license, I develop a “fabulosophy” that takes a stroll through a forgotten cemetery, an improvised melody played beneath a secret radar array, and a daydream had in a dilapidated post office as expressive of a thought experiment whose meaningful result is more a fictional achievement than a factual reckoning. Images and sounds from my peregrinations through the Zone figure in this work as elements that advance a story about a future people displaced by climate change who evolve the ability to lure affections from environmental spaces by casting melodies into them. In this future history we learn about the costs of noise and the nature of holes; we discover that media travel backwards in time, and we sense not what the zone is but what mood it’s in.

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Emma Rayward, "As if: Constructing speculative topological fiction"

Speculative topological writing is an interdisciplinary practice that approaches fiction about real and non-real objects from a mathematical perspective. Topology is a discipline that focuses on the relationships between, and the position of, points of sets in space. Topological fiction allows for a reconfiguration of tangible and intangible structures by re-evaluating the kinds of transformations that can take place within them. Through a sample of writing experiments that deploy topology’s concepts and methods, as well as their results, the proposed paper both articulates and demonstrates this creative practice.

Topology operates with a specific language: a combination of natural as well as mathematical language, with the former re-appropriating terms from the latter. In topology, open and closed are not antonyms, a space can be both open and closed. Topological fiction brings these defined terms back into natural language, maintaining an internal logical consistency, but producing a radically different appearance. Ben Marcus has undertaken a similar project in his novels, including The Age of Wire and String, where English terms are separated from their typical definitions. Learning and using the language of topology is like learning a foreign language, one must work to make sense of the new relationships between words, objects and subjects. The effect this produces may be disorienting, but it enables encounters with alternate perspectives and novel ways to approach the world.

More than using topology as an analogy to describe contemporary conditions, it is used as a method to reconfigure the language used around such conditions. My writing will always be informed by local and global politics, so using the language of topology I attempt to reckon with the outcome of the recent Australian federal election and the conservative beliefs that underpin it. I write 'as if'; writing about the real world in a non-real way.

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Davis Schneiderman, "Drone-Space Modulator"

"Drone-Space Modulator” is a nine-minute film made in partnership with the drone firm AeroVista Innovations; the film documents Schneiderman, his wife, Kelly Haramis, and their family playing under the thermal shadow of two drones. The film examines the anxieties of the present moment where “drones” are the remote harbingers of distant bombing and devastation and also the stuff of $20 children’s toys. Made up of technologies ranging from simple batteries to more elaborate high-tech software, the drone is a complicated amalgamation machine that has captured our collective imagination in the 21st century. Both enemy and friend, it conjures up the lethal accuracy of military grade Predators and those quick-silver, toy-like cameras that captures breathtaking aerial shots.

The film was shot at Highland Park, Illinois’ Olsen Park, and is connected to the Art Institute of Chicago’s exhibit Moholy-Nagy: Future Present, about groundbreaking Hungarian artist Lazlo Moholy-Nagy.

Schneiderman conceptualized the blocking of the two craft in relation to each other, along with the thermal elements and the title cards containing Moholy-Nagy quotations; this interplay becomes part of the through line tracing the kinetic sense of play and freedom embedded in the possibility of the craft—the joy of close flight—and the surveillance regime implanted into the technology. Schneiderman, Haramis, and their children are never in danger, despite the quickening thermal images that close the piece. Yet, they are in danger. We are in danger. And someone is watching. That last sentiment is a platitude. Obviously, our passwords are compromised. Of course, our civil liberties have been challenged. We know it. We accept it. We invite it into our yard, and after charging in our micro USB port, we watch it take flight above just our heads.

Speakers
TM

Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint

Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint is the author of the novel, The End of Peril, the End of Enmity, the End of Strife, a Haven (Noemi Press, 2018), which won the Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature, and the family history project, Zat Lun, which won the 2018 Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize... Read More →
EP

Eldritch Priest

Eldritch Priest writes on sonic culture, experimental aesthetics and the philosophy of experience from a ’pataphysical perspective. He is Assistant professor in the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University. Eldritch is also a composer and improviser, as well as... Read More →
ER

Emma Rayward

Emma Rayward is a current Doctor of Creative Arts candidate at the Writing and Society Research Centre of the University of Western Sydney. Her thesis project is interdisciplinary, sitting at the juncture of topology, science fiction and experimental writing practice. Emma’s writing... Read More →
DS

Davis Schneiderman

Provost and Dean of the Faculty / Lake Forest College, Lake Forest College
Davis Schneiderman is Krebs Provost and Dean of the Faculty, and Professor of English at Lake Forest College. He is the author or editor of more than 10 books. His first short-story collection, there is no appropriate #emoji, will be released in Fall 2019, and his recent novels BLANK... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW1-051 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Cascadia by Anthology
SPLAB is a Washington-based poetics-oriented non-profit organization founded in 1993. Using the tools of literature, our organization addresses the cultural, political, and social issues facing us in contemporary society, among them end-stage empire, the destruction of the biosphere, rampant xenophobia and violence and extreme income inequality. At &Now we seek to create a dialog around the anthologies we have conceived and published, how they fit into our bioregional cultural investigation: how the stance of bioregionalism is founded in sustainability (resistance to colonialism and empire, social diversity (or lack thereof); and the unique culture of Cascadia. SPLAB board members Cate Gable, Nadine Maestas, Paul E Nelson and Matt Trease will each discuss at least one of the recent publications: the Samthology, Make it True: Poetry From Cascadia, Make it True meets Medusario, American Prophets and 56 Days of August, the connections to bioregionalism and the bridges between cultures/interests/affinity groups we have sought to build via these projects. Some of our points of convergence are the specifics of location, transgender politics, serial poetics, ethnicity, and the fallibility of translation.

Speakers
avatar for Cate Gable

Cate Gable

Axion Communications Intl.
Cate Gable is a Journalist, strategic planner for NGOs, poet & author, ecopreneur & agent for change, musician, and foodie, w/ homes in Paris, France; Seattle & Nahcotta WA. She is a columnist for the Chinook Observer.
NA

Nadine Antoinette Maestas

Nadine Antoinette Maestas is a poet’s poet and believes that the empire of the sentence is an extremely oppressive totalitarian regime. She loves mountain biking and trail running in dangerous and remote places in the Northwest and teaches Creative Writing and Literature in San... Read More →
avatar for Paul E. Nelson

Paul E. Nelson

Founding Director, SPLAB (Seattle Poetics LAB)
Founder of SPLAB and the Cascadia Poetry Festival, Paul E. Nelson was a professional broadcaster from 1980 to 2006, produced over 600 interviews and has given presentations or readings in Brussels, London, China, Nanaimo and elsewhere. Published books include: American Prophets (Interviews... Read More →
MT

Matt Trease

Matt Trease is an artist, poet, IT Analyst, and astrologer living in south Seattle, WA, where he serves on the board of the Seattle Poetics Lab (SPLAB) and co-curates the Margin Shift reading series. His poems have recently appeared in small po[r]tions, WordLitZine, Phoebe, Fact-Simile... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW1-050 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Fantasia Verde: An Opera in Progress
A poet/librettist, composer, and dramaturge discuss their collaborative approach to the interdisciplinary convergence of words, music, and staging in an experimental music theatre work in progress, Fantasia Verde. How do we convey to audiences the complicated world of a forest, the science behind these life forms, and the urgent crisis posed by global warming? Learning rather than preaching about trees is one of several central challenges. We will present key moments from the work on audio and video recordings to demonstrate our approach and deliberations about how words and music interact, how eco-poetics meets eco-musicology, how original words/scores can be hybridized with found materials and ancient myths and folk tunes, and how scientific vocabularies can be woven with poetic sensibility into sung arias and choruses, and programmatic instrumental music. General topics posed by any collaborative work may surface, such as how individual styles synergize or collide, and social perspectives on a diversity of prospective audiences.

“There was once upon a time…, ‘A King’, my little readers will instantly exclaim. No, children, you are wrong. There was once upon a time a piece of wood”. Thus begins Pinocchio (1881) by Carlo Collodi. In a sense, this panel will follow the past history of that piece of wood and others like it. We intend to explore the time scope of a forest, take a long view that includes the past, present and possible futures of these massive fellow creatures in their vast numbers, by particularizing and dramatizing their life processes and struggles to survive. We hope we will hear feedback and criticism from our audience to help us continue to chisel and sculpt.

Speakers
JB

Jonathan Balsley

Jonathan Balsley is a composer and music educator in Olympia Washington. He studied classical and electronic music composition, philosophy, psychology, and comparative religion at The Evergreen State College and music performance at Hillsong International Leadership College. His work... Read More →
AB

Andrew Buchman

Andrew Buchman, a composer and musical dramaturge, teaches music theater offerings at Evergreen. He has published articles on dramaturgy in the musicals Hair (1968) by Gerome Ragni, James Rado, and Galt MacDermot, Company (1970), and Merrily We Roll Along (1980), both by George Furth... Read More →
avatar for Zhang Er

Zhang Er

Zhang Er, poet and opera librettist, was born in Beijing and moved to US in 1986. She is the author of six collections of poetry in Chinese, most recently Closest to You (2017). Her most recent book in English translation, First Mountain (2018), a collaborative work with American... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW1-030 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Spelling: Poetry as spell-casting
Every day, those of us who are pushed to the margin experience relentless attacks by those in power. Climate catastrophe looms. Brutal capitalism, systemic racism, and the extractive economy are destroying our communities, shredding any safety nets, and leaving the world wrecked. The patriarchy tightens its grip, threatening the self-determination and agency of women, trans and genderqueer folks, and queer people.

And in response, there is a great rising up. People are converging, coming together across communities, across differences, across the silos of academia, organizing, the arts and literature to resist and build.

And, more than ever, people are turning to the convergence of poetry and magic. It’s no coincidence; people are longing for new ways of relating to each other and the world--and magic, poetry, and poets offer as much. As Kenji Liu writes in the introduction to “Incantations: The SCOTUS Decision in Trump v. Hawaii :: 585 U.S. ___ (2018)” in UnMargins: “In addition to protesting, building complex communities of resistance and vision, and self-care practices, writers also have language, one of the original magicks. We too can summon our own enchantments, incantations, protections, charms, curses, hexes, blessings, auguries, banishments, and more.”

This panel features poets writing from communities under attack: people of color, queer people, and immigrants. We will discuss poetry as spell-casting and as a transformative act. We write from the margins—not toward the center—but towards a new configuration of society. We remember, recover, and write into the ways our ancestors survived and thrived: through magic, intuitive ways of knowing, and a relationship to the natural world radically different from today’s capitalist, racist, and extractive economies.

We will conclude the panel by creating a collective, convergence spell/poem with the audience.

Speakers
avatar for Tamiko Beyer

Tamiko Beyer

Tamiko Beyer is the author of two poetry collections from Alice James Books, Last Days (forthcoming), We Come Elemental, and two chapbooks. Her work has been published in Black Warrior Review, Denver Quarterly, Georgia Review, Literary Hub, the Rumpus, Hyphen, Dusie, and elsewhere... Read More →
DH

Destiny Hemphill

Destiny Hemphill is a poet and healer based in Durham, NC. She is a 2017 Callaloo Fellow and a 2016 Amiri Baraka Scholar at Naropa University’s Summer Writing Program. Her chapbook Oracle: a Cosmology (Honeysuckle Press, 2018) was a finalist for the inaugural Honeysuckle Press Chapbook... Read More →
avatar for Tatiana Figueroa Ramirez

Tatiana Figueroa Ramirez

Tatiana Figueroa Ramirez holds a B.A. in English Literature and is a VONA Voices Alumna. She performs and teaches poetry workshops in the Washington DC area, having done so in New York, Philadelphia, Miami, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic. She is the author of Coconut Curls... Read More →
avatar for Lisbeth White

Lisbeth White

Lisbeth White is a poet, editor and Expressive Arts Therapist whose writing explores the healing of displacement and trauma as a woman of color through connection with ancestral and energetic relationships to the natural world. She is an alumna of VONA/Voices, Tin House, Callaloo... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
DISC-252 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

When Poetry Meets Science
Poets and witers have always grappled with the science of their times. (In some cases, the art works have outlasted the scientific theories.) In the 19th century, poets tended to see science as a matter-of-fact enemy of the imagination. Blake saw Newton as a nemesis. But times have changed. In the 20th century physics showed us that nature is much stranger and more paradoxical than we imagined. In the 21st century, biology has demonstrated that natural systems are much more complexly and delicately intertwined than we knew. Lately poets and other writers have been drawn to discovering what they can learn from physics, biology, and systems analysis as well as how they can interact with this knowledge in their creative work. This panel will bring together three writers whose work engages with transdisciplinary investigations into shared principles of literature and science. They will share their results.

Speakers
RA

Rae Armantrout

Rae Armantrout’s most recent books, Versed, Money Shot, Just Saying, Itself, Partly: New and Selected Poems, Entanglements, (a chapbook selection of poems in conversation with physics), and Wobble were published by Wesleyan University Press. Wobble, a finalist for the 2018 National... Read More →
avatar for Laynie Browne

Laynie Browne

Laynie Browne’s recent books include: In Garments Worn by Lindens, Periodic Companions, and The Book of Moments. Her honors include a Pew Fellowship, the National Poetry Series Award, and the Contemporary Poetry Series. She teaches at University of Pennsylvania and at Swarthmore... Read More →
avatar for Amy Catanzano

Amy Catanzano

Amy Catanzano’s writing moves between genres and disciplines, often with a focus on the intersections of poetry, art, and branches of science such as physics and astronomy. She is the author of Starlight in Two Million: A Neo-Scientific Novella, a hybrid work combining poetry with... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW1-040 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Performing Virtual Selves
Stine An, "In other words... Crab sticks are VR too!"

"In other words... Crab sticks are VR too!" is a piece that combines elements of performance, virtual reality, and poetry to explore the virtuality of diasporic identity. While building a DIY VR kit, I noticed the instruction manual’s claim that “crab sticks are VR too.” Imitation crab meat tastes like crab, but it is made of fish. Imitation crab meat is virtually crab meat.

Imitation crab meat is often made with the industrially processed flesh of the Alaskan Pollock, a fish important in Korean culture. Called “명태” (myeong-tae) in Korean, Alaskan Pollock has multiple other names based on its preparation, age, and method of consumption. As a person of the Korean diaspora, I wanted to dive into the virtuality (and the virtuosity) of being a diasporic identity by performing both imitation crab meat and Alaskan Pollock in a virtual medium.

By performing in and through a virtual world, I find the freedom to embody dislocation and to operate between a multitude of mediums, practices, and identities. Is this work poetry? Choreography? Video game? Theater? Advertising? Critique? The uncertainty of existing between these spaces places the performer in the role of a failed imitator who, like the imitation crab meat, inadvertently becomes their own thing. In this virtual world, this virtual crab stick is aware of its own creation and consumption.

Materials / Medium:
For this performance, I combine CC0-licensed images, videos, and sound with original poetry as well as found text from imitation crab meat packaging to expand on what is virtual and how different virtualities can be in conversation and movement together. I play the performance in a virtual world (available at https://sage-dinghy.glitch.me/) programmed using A-Frame, a web framework for building virtual reality experiences. The attached video is just one example of a possible performance.

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cris cheek & Erin E. Edwards, "BAMBI-WOLF: in a clearing"

In the contemporary forest, Bambi-Wolves are restive creatures, crossing and muddying boundaries among species, genders, and habitations. BAMBI-WOLF is a collaborative experiment in posthuman life writing, a set of interlocking fairy tails drawing upon personal histories of performance and tracking humanimal paths across indicative staging grounds: urban watering holes, fugitive spaces at the edges of small-town America, the so-called wilderness, and the rehearsal space—a site of mimicry, camouflage, and becoming. Taking the multivocality of the forest as a model for praxis, BAMBI-WOLF engages with a range of texts. Felix Salten’s environmentally bleak Bambi: A Life in the Woods and its Disneyfication are the most obvious, but our text also calls on, and sings through, more anonymous voices and nonhuman sounds, including lycanthropic lore, hunting and trapping discourses, the cryptic marks of pointe shoe makers, creaking stage boards, wind and breath moving across skin stretched into new instruments. BAMBI-WOLF explores the processes of reading tracks and hearing resonant marks: we ask how media scripts project humanist properties onto animals when we have them in our sights—and what escapes; we write through memories, memory holes, and representational traps into the clearing of a blistered pastoral; we attend to the sinews and cuts of what might be a new kind of humanimal tale. This multimodal performance of the most recent writing from BAMBI-WOLF will animate the text through voice, field recording, and projected image.

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Ian Hatcher, "Private Screening"

Created on commission for a Goat Island retrospective at the Chicago Cultural Center, which premiered June 2019.

Private Screening is a personally implicated piece in which I perform both as myself (deliberately unscripted) and in character as an artificially intelligent agent. The text explores the edges of constructed identity, depersonalization, definitions of opacity and transparency, problems of directional time and machine learning modeling (as articulated by Wendy Chun), Bitcoin, self-consciousness and visibility, and historically entrenched power and privilege encoded into language. It also contains jokes and a small plastic bird.

Speakers
avatar for Stine An

Stine An

MFA ‘20 student, Brown University Literary Arts
Stine An is a Korean American poet based in Providence, RI. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Ohio Edit, Nat. Brut, the minnesota review, and the Best American Experimental Writing series. Stine studied writing at the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts at Bard College... Read More →
CC

cris cheek


cris cheek is a documentary performance writer, sound composer and photographer. They worked alongside Bob Cobbing and Bill Griffiths with the Consortium of London Presses to run a thriving open access print shop for poets. In 1981 they co-founded a collective movement-based performance... Read More →
avatar for Erin E. Edwards

Erin E. Edwards

Associate Professor, Miami University
Erin E. Edwards is Associate Professor of English at Miami University, Ohio, and the author of The Modernist Corpse: Posthumanism and the Posthumous (University of Minnesota Press, 2018). Her research explores the intersections among posthumanism, death studies, ecocriticism, and... Read More →
avatar for Ian Hatcher

Ian Hatcher

Free Agent, The American Precariat
Ian Hatcher is a writer, vocalist, programmer, and performance artist whose work focuses on human/machine entanglement. His books and records include Prosthesis (Poor Claudia); Drone Pilot (cOsmOsmOse); Colony (ESPTV); and Abra, a conjoined artists' book and generative poetry app... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW2-021 Dance Studio 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Horrors of the Family Romance
How is the institution of the family idealized in our current moment, and what horrors are unleashed in the process? What’s expected of today’s parents, children, siblings and partners, and how does innovative fiction rewrite those narratives in disturbing, satirical and possibly liberatory ways?

In this combination reading and discussion, panelists present their own work and reflect upon fiction that grapples with family, taking on the hidden and not so hidden dangers of intimacy, whether forced or freely chosen (or something in between).

Speakers
RB

Rebecca Brown

Rebecca Brown is the author of Not Heaven, Somewhere Else (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2018) and a dozen earlier titles published in the US and abroad, including American Romances, The Last Time I Saw You, The Dogs, The Terrible Girls (all with City Lights Books), and The Gifts of the Body... Read More →
BE

Brian Evenson

Brian Evenson is the author of more than a dozen books of fiction, most recently the story collection Songs for the End of the World (2019). His novel Last Days won the 2009 ALA-RUSA Award. His novel The Open Curtain (Coffee House Press) was a finalist for an Edgar Award and an IHG... Read More →
avatar for Christina Milletti

Christina Milletti

Christina Milletti’s novel Choke Box: a Fem-Noir won the Juniper Prize for Fiction and was published by University of Massachusetts Press in March 2019. Her first book, The Religious & Other Fiction (a collection of stories) was published by Carnegie Mellon University Press, and... Read More →
JS

Janet Sarbanes

Janet Sarbanes is the author of the short fiction collections Army of One (Otis Press/Seismicity Editions) and The Protester Has Been Released (C & R Press). The recipient of a 2017 Creative Capital/Andy Warhol art writer’s grant, Sarbanes has also published art criticism and other... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
DISC-061 Auditorium 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

12:00pm

Climate Strike Climate Council
Work is the transformation of energy. Today there is a worldwide climate strike. Because the way things work isn't working:
work stoppage; school stoppage. Because the dominant model of productivism produces extinction; stopping production.
In this lunch time climate council we will touch base about our climate work, climate feelings, and climate changes.

Dekila Chungyalpa has said that no one can not be a climate worker today. What does it mean for us to become climate workers,
whatever else we are, whatever else we do, and how is doing that climate work imbricated with undoing, dismantling, and ceasing
from other forms of production? 

Speakers
avatar for Miranda Mellis

Miranda Mellis

Miranda Mellis is the author of a book of aphorisms and anecdotes called Demystifications (forthcoming), and several books of fiction: The Spokes, None of This Is Real, and The Revisionist. She is a co-author of The Instead, a book length dialogue with Emily Abendroth. She co-edited... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 12:00pm - 12:50pm
North Creek Events Center 18325 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

12:00pm

Lunch Break
Pre-purchased boxed lunches will be available at North Creek Event Center.
You must present your conference badge to receive your meal.
Boxed lunches may be pre-purchased through the registration website any time before 9/12/2019.
For additional dining locations, please see this page.

Friday September 20, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
North Creek Events Center 18325 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

12:00pm

Bookfair—Open Books: A Poem Emporium
This year’s official bookseller is Open Books, A Poem Emporium, which will be on-site throughout the conference. In addition to offering our keynotes’ recent volumes, Open Books will be happy to buy books direct from participants and offer 60% in cash or 80% in store credit for any books sold. Titles may be dropped off in person at the book fair table or shipped ahead.

To ship titles by mail, packages must be received by Tuesday Sept. 17, 2019. Ship to:
Open Books Attn: For &Now
2414 North 45th Street
Seattle, WA 98103

Titles can be returned by mail within three months of the &Now conference if author emails openpoetrybooks at gmail.com requesting titles to be returned by mail and pays shipping costs. Otherwise, any remaining copies will be considered a gift in kind.

Friday September 20, 2019 12:00pm - 4:00pm
North Creek Events Center 18325 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Real Life: An Installation
Performers Abraham Avnisan, Courtlin Byrd, Emma Gomis, Joseph Steele and Edwin Torres present works that respond to a series of imagined art installations written by Julie Carr. Performances include dance, projection, and audio works. Each installation imagines the body in a form of duress and/or surveillance. Taken together the installations ask questions about bodily autonomy and the performance of suffering in the surveillance state.

See www.reallifeaninstallation.com for a preview of some of the texts and video works these artists have made.

Speakers
EG

Emma Gomis

Emma is a Catalan-American essayist, poet, and translator. She is the cofounder of Manifold Press which publishes texts in experimental criticism. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing & Poetics from Naropa’s Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, and will be pursuing a PhD... Read More →
avatar for Abraham Avnisan

Abraham Avnisan

Assistant Professor, Kent State University
Abraham Avnisan is an experimental writer and new media artist whose work is situated at the intersection of image, text, and code. He creates mobile apps, new media installations and mixed reality performances that seek to subvert dominant narratives through embodied encounters with... Read More →
CB

Courtlin Byrd

Courtlin Byrd is a multimedia artist, writer, and co-founder of the Topological Poetics Research Institute (TPRI). Hailing from California by way of Tennessee, she is currently a bartender and PhD student in Media Study at SUNY Buffalo. She uses video to explore language and to disrupt... Read More →
JC

Julie Carr

Julie Carr is the author of ten books of poetry and prose. Her most recent book and web project is Real Life: An Installation.
avatar for Joe Steele

Joe Steele

PhD Candidate, Instructor, CU Boulder, Dept. of Critical Media Practices
Joe Steele is an artist-filmmaker and curator, currently a PhD student in Critical Media Practices at CU Boulder. His work explores the collisions, compositions, and lines of flight that happen in the archive, and brings artistic practice into dialogue with other domains and disc... Read More →
avatar for Edwin Torres

Edwin Torres

Lingualisualist, Brainlingo
Edwin Torres is a NYC native whose books include, “XOETEOX: the infinite word object” (Wave Books), “Ameriscopia” (University of Arizona Press), “In The Function of External Circumstances” (Nightboat), and “The PoPedology of an Ambient Language” (Atelos Books). Anthologies... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
UW2-021 Dance Studio 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Learning to Die, A lot
Eight literary artists discuss receiving and incorporating life-altering revelations during the writing process. The audience will be encouraged to share too. Participants include: Katherine M. Agard, Meliza Bañales, Teresa Carmody, Miranda Mellis, Reema Rajbanshi, Anna Joy Springer, and Gina Srmabekian.

Speakers
KA

Katherine Agyemaa Agard

Katherine is a dual citizen of Trinidad & Tobago and Ghana. She lives in San Francisco. Her first book, of colour, won the Essay Press/University of Washington Bothell MFA book prize. It will be published in early 2020.
avatar for Meliza Bañales

Meliza Bañales

Meliza Bañales aka Missy Fuego is the author of three books and was a 2016 Lambda Literary Award Finalist for Best LGBT Debut Fiction for her novel Life Is Wonderful, People Are Terrific. She was a fixture in the spoken-word, slam, and Queer artist communities of the San Francisco... Read More →
TC

Teresa Carmody

Teresa Carmody is the author of Maison Femme: a fiction (2015) and Requiem (2005). Her work has appeared in The Collagist, Big Fiction, Two Serious Ladies, St. Petersburg Review, Faultline, Entropy, and more. Carmody is co-founding editor of Les Figues Press, an imprint of LARB Books... Read More →
avatar for Miranda Mellis

Miranda Mellis

Miranda Mellis is the author of a book of aphorisms and anecdotes called Demystifications (forthcoming), and several books of fiction: The Spokes, None of This Is Real, and The Revisionist. She is a co-author of The Instead, a book length dialogue with Emily Abendroth. She co-edited... Read More →
RR

Reema Rajbanshi

Reema Rajbanshi is a creative and critical writer who works with semi-experimental texts that consider girlhood, violence, and startling turns in un/familiar places. Her story collection Sugar, Smoke, Song, which won the Women's Prose Prize for Red Hen Press, is forthcoming in 2020... Read More →
avatar for Anna Joy Springer

Anna Joy Springer

Anna Joy Springer hosted the the &Now festival "Tomorrowland Forever in 2011 with Amina Cain at UC San Diego. She is the author of The Vicious Red Relic, Love (Jaded Ibis, 2011), an illustrated fabulist memoir with soundscape (Your Metaforest Guidebook), and The Birdwisher, A Murder... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
DISC-252 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Poetry, Pedagogy, and Prison Abolition
This panel will discuss work currently emerging in and around the Poetry Workshop at the Women’s Huron Valley Correctional Facility (WHV) in Michigan. All three presentations will illustrate a critical relationship between aesthetics and the production of resistance literatures inside a repressive state institution. In addition, we will consider the potential for poetry to usher new forms of consciousness into being as part of the work to transform our social relations. The prison may be the most explicit manifestation of the logic of empire within the national border and one of our most occluded sites of relation. It is in this very occlusion and separation from the public sphere that the prison structures and defines what it means to be a “free citizen.” Through poetry—the commons of language—writers writing under the most inhospitable conditions find one another along various lines of flight: care and affection, healing and resistance. It is with this assumption that our panel will consider the role of poetry and fugitive language in disrupting the logic of the carceral state. For us “out here,” the poems from the Poetry Workshop break the official register of the carceral state and organize our senses with the hope of abolishing the prison all together. In short, this panel will reflect on the role of critical literatures to index and disrupt the logics of racial capitalism and mass-incarceration but will also speak to the radical affection and care opened by poets writing inside. Our panel will include: “Sabotage, State Language and Poems from inside WHV” (Megan Stockton); “The Leper Colony in Michelle Cliff's Free Enterprise as Abolitionist Figure for Poetry ‘Inside’ (Adam Malinowski); and, “‘Mute Opposable Evidence’: Toward a Counter-Forensic Poetics for Abolition” (Rob Halpern). We also hope to present audio of work read by incarcerated poets themselves.

Speakers
RH

Rob Halpern

Rob Halpern lives between San Francisco and Ypsilanti where he teaches at Eastern Michigan University and Huron Valley Women’s Prison. He's the author of five collections of poetry, including Music for Porn (Nightboat Books 2012), Common Place (Ugly Duckling Presse 2015), and most... Read More →
AM

Adam Malinowski

Adam Malinowski is a poet who lives in Detroit. They hold an M.A. in Creative Writing from Eastern Michigan University and facilitate a poetry workshop at Women’s Huron Valley Correctional Facility in Ypsilanti, MI. Their work can be found at Poets Reading the News, Philosophical... Read More →
avatar for Rosie Stockton

Rosie Stockton

Writer's Block Facilitator at the Women's Huron Valley Correctional Facility
Rosie Stockton is a poet based in Detroit, Michigan. They recently received their M.A. in Creative Writing at Eastern Michigan University and edited BathHouse Journal and Weekday Journal. Their writing has been published by Publication Studio, Monster House Press, BigBig Wednesday... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
UW1-050 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Recombinant Poetics
What is revealed and reshaped within the process of recombining texts? Four panelists share the radical possibilities that emerge out of their remixing practices.

Lillian-Yvonne Bertram’s “Forever Gwen Brooks & Intentionally Black Computational Poetics” explores the use of computation to reveal and challenge discrimination embedded at the level of computer code and to invent counter narratives that decolonize norms of race, gender, aesthetics, and language. These interventions find ways to use computation to invigorate and extend important works of Black poets into a digital future. Bertram will focus on two web-based generators: Forever Gwen Brooks, a poetry generator, and a work-in-progress generator of near-infinite Millie & Christine McCoy syncopated sonnets from Tyehimba Jess’s Olio.

Joel Katelnikoff’s “Lyn Hejinian Recombined: ‘everything is subject to visibility’” investigates Hejinian’s poetry and poetics applying a cut-up / remix / montage technique directly to the materials of her textual corpus. The result is an essay that is capable of simultaneously speaking about Hejinian’s critical concepts, speaking through Hejinian’s language and syntax, and producing a metanarrative theorization of the cut-up / remix / montage process. Katelnikoff creates a hybrid mind with Hejinian’s work, creating linkages that would otherwise elude one’s cognition, resulting in Hejinian-inspired aphorisms that reject closure, while also inviting the reader/listener’s own radical perceptual engagement.

Katie Schaag’s “The Infinite Woman” is a feminist post-conceptual erasure poetry project that performatively excavates the voice of “the infinite woman” encased within a male-authored, first-person fictional narrative: Edison Marshall’s novel The Infinite Woman (1950). Schaag extracts and rearranges sentences from the book containing the word “I” within a lyric poem to recontextualize the voice of the female protagonist, satirizing the novel with a melodramatic tonal and affective register and producing surprising moments of imaginative feminist agency. With a team of Georgia Tech computer science and computational media students (Alayna Panlilio, Ryan Power, Josh Terry, Alex Yang, and Jeffrey Zhang), she is currently developing a digital extension of the project: a cross-platform app that remixes lines from Marshall’s The Infinite Woman with Simone de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex.

Marci Vogel’s “Inside the Tree of Battles: A Dendrochronology of War [with a selection from «leavings»]" asks how critical scholarship, translation practice, and creative literary enactment might converge with knowledge production to uncover alternative modes of thinking and, ultimately, new solutions. Vogel’s contemporary study of proto-feminist poet Christine de Pizan (1365-1430) proposes innovative models for engaging with literary works, and for creating them. Influenced by Christine's unabashed mixing and merging of genres and multitude of rhetorical forms, this sequence from Vogel's book-length critical-creative study, XENO » GLOSSIA, follows a nested chronology of violence only to unravel formerly inscribed histories and introduce a sequence of lyrical erasures against war.

Speakers
avatar for Lillian-Yvonne Bertram

Lillian-Yvonne Bertram

Director, MFA in Creative Writing
Lillian-Yvonne Bertram is the author of Travesty Generator (2019), How Narrow My Escapes (2019), Personal Science (2017), a slice from the cake made of air (2016), cutthroat glamours (2013), But a Storm is Blowing From Paradise (2012) and the artist book Grand Dessein (2018). They... Read More →
avatar for Joel Katelnikoff

Joel Katelnikoff

Recombinant Theory
Joel Katelnikoff holds a PhD from the University of Alberta. He is currently compiling a collection of Recombinant Theory, remixing the poetic and critical work of ten writers, including Annharte, Charles Bernstein, Christian Bök, Johanna Drucker, Lyn Hejinian, Steve McCaffery, Erín... Read More →
avatar for Katie Schaag

Katie Schaag

Postdoctoral Fellow, Georgia Tech
Katie Schaag is a writer and artist making work for the page, stage, gallery, screen, and social context. Camp, melodrama, and artifice tonally inflect her queer feminist deconstructions of the hysterical feminine archetype. Her work has been published by Ugly Ducking Presse, Yes... Read More →
avatar for Marci Vogel

Marci Vogel

Postdoctoral Scholar Teaching Fellow, University of Southern California
Marci Vogel is the author of DEATH AND OTHER HOLIDAYS (Melville House, 2018), winner of the inaugural Miami Book Fair/de Groot Prize, and AT THE BORDER OF WILSHIRE & NOBODY (Howling Bird Press, 2015), winner of the inaugural Howling Bird Press Poetry Prize. Her poetry, prose, translations... Read More →



Friday September 20, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
UW1-030 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Writing and Performance Across Multilingual Networks
This panel focuses on multilingual, multimodal literary networks. It addresses the points of convergence between multiple languages, translations, transcreation, and activism and examines the way that communities have written and are writing through and against local, national, global, and language networks. Rather than focusing on a specific language, media format, cultural community, or geographic location, this panel hopes to engender a variety of responses to the state of innovative contemporary language art in a global community that is increasingly defined by multiple, intersecting, and competing networks. Panelists will ask: what future citizenship(s) do multilingual literatures enable? How do we imagine a non-English poetics that resists translation? What dynamics between majority and minority language networks are enacted in and enabled by translation, performance, pedagogy, and activism? Related areas of interest include the gaps between networks, where literature, performance, and translations are rendered illegible or are forced to mutate according to the specific requirements of a network to reveal—or conceal—possibilities of interpretation. Bringing together editors, publishers, writers, and scholars, who will discuss their own writing, perform excerpts, and/or discuss creators, networks, and systems, this panel offers a diversity of perspectives that will trouble the points of convergence between multilingual networks.

Speakers
avatar for Gabrielle Civil

Gabrielle Civil

black feminist performance artist
Gabrielle Civil is a black feminist performance artist, poet, and writer, originally from Detroit, MI. She has premiered fifty original performance art works around the world, including her year-long project “In & Out of Place” as a Fulbright Fellow in Mexico and her “Fugue... Read More →
avatar for Angel Dominguez

Angel Dominguez

Angel Dominguez is a Latinx poet and artist of Yucatec Mayan descent, born in Hollywood, and raised in Van Nuys, CA by his immigrant family. He's the author of Desgraciado (Econo Textual Objects, 2017), and Black Lavender Milk (Timeless Infinite Light, 2015). His work can be found... Read More →
EL

ELÆ [Lynne DeSilva-Johnson]

ELÆ [Lynne DeSilva-Johnson] is an multimodal creative practitioner and performer, cultural scholar and educator. Their work addresses the somatic, ontological intersections between persons, forms of language, and systems, as well as the study of resilient, open source strategies... Read More →
avatar for Sawako Nakayasu

Sawako Nakayasu

Assistant Professor, Brown University
Sawako Nakayasu is an artist working with language, performance, and translation – separately and in various combinations. She has lived mostly in the US and Japan, briefly in France and China, and translates from Japanese. Her books include The Ants (Les Figues Press), Texture... Read More →
OT

Orchid Tierney

Kenyon College
Orchid Tierney is a poet and scholar from Aotearoa-New Zealand. Her publications include Brachiation (Dunedin: GumTree Press, 2012), The World in Small Parts (Chicago: Dancing Girl Press, 2012),  Earsay (TrollThread, 2016), Gallipoli Diaries (GaussPDF, 2017), ocean plastic (New York... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
DISC-061 Auditorium 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Notes in Passing: hypnotically porpoise exercises in lectures
Our session is lecture as performance and audience as performance. A participatory lecture. An act of collective writing. Collective acts of secret performativity within a public performance.

Come into the room. Take your seat. You will notice a lectern and other academic paraphernalia. You may also notice some incongruous items.

Shortly, a series of 3-4 mini lectures will ensue.

Here we go.

Meanwhile, it’s possible that, in the words of Anne Garréta, “a real polyphonic epistolary novel [will be] being composed during class in the rows on the right side.” That is to say, we will be passing notes. Notes on money (is this conference worth it?), on deadening ambition (“If I disappeared from public life - stopped talking, reading, teaching, interviews, small pieces - except to publish a book every few years would anyone be there to still read it?- recent tweet from Anne Boyer), and maybe on love (desire is always on our fingertips).

As in any class, the audience members can simply listen to the lecture, maybe take notes. (Will someone interrupt the lecture to ask a question?) And/or they can participate in passing notes. If a note comes your way, what role will you take on in this academic classroom community? Will you write back? Or forward? What about these items that don’t belong in the room?

Here we are as writers. We did not become writers to go to conferences! And yet we find ourselves here. (Should we right ourselves/write our selves out?)

Speakers
avatar for Stine An

Stine An

MFA ‘20 student, Brown University Literary Arts
Stine An is a Korean American poet based in Providence, RI. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Ohio Edit, Nat. Brut, the minnesota review, and the Best American Experimental Writing series. Stine studied writing at the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts at Bard College... Read More →
avatar for Mairéad Byrne

Mairéad Byrne

Professor of Poetry + Poetics, Rhode Island School of Design
Mairéad Byrne has two chapbook publications in 2019: In & Out (Smithereens Press) and har sawlya (Above/Ground Press). Recent journal publications include the Chicago Review Online, Poetry Ireland Review, Smithereens, Icarus, StepAway, Past Simple, and Decals of Desire. Her poetry... Read More →
DD

Darcie Dennigan

Darcie Dennigan is an award-winning poet and playwright whose books include Madame X and The Parking Lot and other feral scenarios. She lives in Providence, RI.
avatar for Stacey Tran

Stacey Tran

Stacey Tran is a writer from Portland, OR. Her writing can be found in BOMB Magazine, The Brooklyn Rail, diaCRITICS, and others. She is the author of Soap for the Dogs (Gramma, 2018; Black Ocean, 2019). She is the creator of Tender Table, a storytelling series about food, community... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
UW1-040 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Neurodivergent Poetics: The Writing Lives of Exceptional Minds
The human mind comes in endless variations, but those that fall outside the neurotypical norm are often dismissed as incapable, unreachable, or unworthy. Could “deficits” also double as lyrical gifts? Could an atypical orientation to the world generate surprising possibilities for poetry? As Chris Martin writes, “Poetry is sensory-rich, patterned language. Autism is characterized by sensory-rich, patterned thought. All the so-called deficits of autistic thought turn out to be strengths in the realm of poetry.” But the world at large is not a realm of poetry. Or is it? Lauren Russell asks, “What if the mind that gives me an intuitive sense for repetition and musicality in poetry is also the mind that holds me hostage to sometimes nearly debilitating OCD?” If some neurodivergent poets experience a tension between celebration and survival, between limitation and possibility, how does that tension manifest on and off the page? And how does neurodiversity intersect with other identities and experiences, in/through poetry and outside it? Naima Tokunow writes, “While our neurodivergence does not define us, it is a part of us. It is too often silenced, erased, made invisible.” What can those silences and erasures yield? Or can poetry transform them? “How might poetry lure a person into language,” DJ Savarese asks, “offering them a chance to be in two places at one time: the linguistic and the sensory, the human and the non-human?” In this roundtable, we will explore these and other questions at the intersection of neurodiversity and poetics.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Martin

Chris Martin

Executive Director, Unrestricted Interest
Chris Martin’s fourth book of poetry, Things to Do in Hell, will be published by Coffee House Press in 2020. He is the recipient of grants from the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Minnesota State Arts Board. He is the co-founder and executive director... Read More →
SM

Saretta Morgan

Saretta Morgan is the author of the chapbooks, Feeling Upon Arrival (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2018) and room for a counter interior (Portable Press @ Yo-Yo Labs, 2017) as well as the full-length collection Plan Upon Arrival (Three Count Pour/Selva Oscura, 2020.) Her most recent writing... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Russell

Lauren Russell

Research Assistant Professor/Assistant Director, Center for African American Poetry and Poetics, University of Pittsburgh
Lauren Russell is the author of What’s Hanging on the Hush (Ahsahta, 2017) an Descent (Tarpaulin Sky, 2020). A 2017 NEA Creative Writing Fellow in Poetry, she has received fellowships and residencies from Cave Canem, The Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, VIDA/The Home School... Read More →
avatar for DJ Savarese

DJ Savarese

Community Youth Fellow, OSF/ Human Rights Initiative
DJ Savarese has written a chapbook entitled A Doorknob for the Eye. Other poems and prose have appeared in literary journals, such as The Iowa Review, Bellingham Review, Seneca Review, Prospect, Stone Canoe, wordgathering.com, Autism in Adulthood and Nine Mile Magazine. “Passive... Read More →
avatar for Naima Yael Tokunow

Naima Yael Tokunow

Naima Yael Tokunow is an educator, writer, editor, & artist currently living in New Mexico. She is the author of two chapbooks, Planetary Bodies, published in 2019 by Black Warrior Review, and MAKE WITNESS, published in 2016 by Zoo Cake Press. A four-time Pushcart Prize nominee, she... Read More →
AW

Adam Wolfond

Adam Wolfond is a 17-year-old non-speaking autistic grade 11 student. Adam attends The A Collective, which is a teaching-learning community supporting neurodiversity and also, The YMCA Academy in Toronto, Canada. His work includes public speaking by typing, creative writing, poetry... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
UW1-121 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

On Ugliness

The idea for this workshop comes from a move made early in The Undercommons, when Moten and Harvey write that “critique endangers the sociality it is supposed to defend.”

One of the goals of this festival is to explore ways to reconfigure poetics. Our suggestion is that to really, radically reconfigure poetics one must first abandon poetical discourse, since poetical arguments are always genres unto themselves and proxies for literary and, by extension, cultural traditions. We’re not excited about tradition.

Since we also take to heart the notion articulated in The Undercommons that “the common perseveres as if a kind of elsewhere, here, around, on the ground, surrounding hallucinogenic facts,” our workshop will explore the common space that surrounds the hallucinogenic facts of arguments about attractiveness, power, and charm: a commons we want to call, for lack of a better term, ugliness (at least for an hour or so).

We seek “convergence” via recombination and juxtaposition of modes and styles of writing that jar, obtrude, derange, and re-function the language we use to talk about poetry, and welcome work that challenges generic, traditional, and critical definitions of fluency, harmony, and/or compatibility.

Readings will be provided with time for discussion and writing.

Sign up by adding to your SCHED.

 

 

 


Speakers
avatar for Broc Rossell

Broc Rossell

Assistant Professor, NTU
Broc Rossell is Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He's author of Festival (Cleveland State 2015) and Alameda (Selva Oscura, 2020), and co-editor with W. Scott Howard of Poetics and Praxis 'After' Objectivism (University of Iowa... Read More →
JS

Jordan Scott

Jordan Scott is the 2018 winner of the Latner Writer’s Trust Poetry Prize, awarded annually to a single Canadian mid-career poet who has mastered the art of poetry. He is the author of Silt; blert; Decomp, a collaboration with Stephen Collis and the ecosphere of British Columbia... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
UW1-060 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

2:30pm

Break
We encourage you to continue conversations begun during your panel while also clearing the space so that the next group of presenters may come in and begin setting up for their presentations.

You may wish to check out some of the exhibitions or to visit the book fair.

Friday September 20, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm

3:00pm

Radical Altars
Asian American poets Diana Khoi Nguyen and Jane Wong seek to engage interweaving points of convergences: of language and food as a means of communication to the dead, of languages (Vietnamese and Chinese, respectively) that refuse translation, and of the brackish water that is Asian American identity. At times, these points blur into each other, are at odds with each other, as well as sustain and bolster each other. Each poet, in conversation with the other, will perform their work through hybrid and interdisciplinary acts, utilizing a mixture of video, audio, text, and food as a means to prepare altars focused on communication, healing, and radical generosity.

Speakers
avatar for Diana Khoi Nguyen

Diana Khoi Nguyen

Writer in Residence, University of Tennessee at Knoxville
A poet and multimedia artist, Diana Khoi Nguyen’s debut collection, Ghost Of (Omnidawn, 2018), was selected by Terrance Hayes for the Omnidawn Open Contest. In addition to winning the 92Y "Discovery" / Boston Review Poetry Contest, 2019 Kate Tufts Discovery Award and Colorado Book... Read More →
avatar for Jane Wong

Jane Wong

Jane Wong's poems can be found in Best American Poetry 2015, American Poetry Review, POETRY, AGNI, New England Review, and others. Her essays have appeared in McSweeney's, Black Warrior Review, Ecotone, The Georgia Review, Shenandoah, and This is the Place: Women Writing About Home... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 3:00pm - 3:37pm
UW1-030 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

Dreaming and Divination
How do we conjure imaginary thinking into our realities and reach for the divine? Two panelists share dreaming and divination practices.
  • Marilyn Freeman  (writing & video)  &  Annie Grosshans -- writing & web
  • Annie Grosshans’ "TheWorldIsNotDoneYet" is a digital-born weblication, a personal narrative in multiple voices, written in and for the cyber medium. Although woven from her inheritance of print practices and memories, this cyber work is a transitional hybrid that dies on the printed page .The first part tells of "What Has Been" through the remembrances of a Thinking Daughter about her life of literate being - defined as how we understand, express and share human meaning. The second part explores “Why This Is Not All Loss” as cyber’s promise of broadened participation in defining meaning converges with a broadened conception of gender, ignited by our struggle over what it means to be female.  We are as our stories have made us.  A change in their meanings, changes us.  In a 20 minute performative presentation, Annie Grosshans accompanied by poet Meg McHutchison will guide visitors through the multi-voiced composition of the piece and its exploration of the question: what is the meaning of Literate Being, now?   
  • Inspired by lectio divina—the ancient method of sacred reading to foster direct engagement with the Divine—CinemaDivina is Marilyn Freeman’s devotional literary media arts practice of creating and sharing short films for communal contemplative screening process. CinemaDivina offers the secular, the everyday and the ordinary as realms of profound possibility, wholeness and essential wisdom. Freeman contextualizes her practice in Dreaming and Divination and will guide attendees through her CinemaDivina shared practice: increasingly immersive film viewings with meditatio (reflection), oratio (response) and contempatio (rest). The session will come to rest in silence with time for participants to savor the experience, to anchor and contemplate insights, and to formulate an intention to take from the room into creative work and everyday life.


Speakers
avatar for Marilyn Freeman

Marilyn Freeman

Media artist and writer Marilyn Freeman is known for her formally daring work on themes of queerness and social justice, as well as her genre-defying/defining work in the area of video essay. Her critical writing theorizing this emergent form has been featured in TriQuarterly, Blackbird... Read More →
avatar for Annie Grosshans

Annie Grosshans

I am a lifelong multidisciplinarian with a core affinity for text based, multi-voiced expression.   Working in and through the Seattle creative communities of exhibition & performance, publications, video/film and now the cyber, I’ve embraced the rapid revolution of mediums and... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
UW1-051 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

Art Writing: Upending the Critic
Leora Fridman, Dorothy R. Santos & Anne Lesley Selcer, "Art Writing: Upending the Critic"

As a multi-genre writer and artist invested in writing that expands and continues discourse, I am deeply invested in contemporary art writing: what it is, what it does, and what it can do in a variety of different contexts.

For this conversation, I’ve gathered a group of writers invested in the possibilities of art writing, distinct from and in relationship to traditional art criticism. Together we’ll consider: How do artists and writers interact to produce ongoing conversation? How can writing about art expand or interrupt existing assumptions around art & identity? What does it mean to write about social practice and performance as the lines between these genres blur and extend? What ethical concerns constrain or embrace art writing?

The writers will discuss what art writing means in their own practice, how it relates to other kinds of art-writing and art-making that they do, and what kinds of lineages they draw on and perform in the making of this work. Inclusive of but also beyond the form of review or critique, these writers make work that invites artists into continuing dialogue with themselves and others, expanding what it means to have seen or reflected on an individual creative work. This &Now conversation will invite further development of what it means to name, describe, analyze, and associate with existing contemporary work, particularly in the context of contemporary political concerns.

---

Raquel Gutiérrez & Jared Stanley, "It's Not Ekphrastic"

This reading features poets whose work is in deep dialogue with contemporary art, who go beyond ekphrasis, using strategies, techniques, ideas based in contemporary art in their writing practice. This cross-pollination between creative practices stems from these writer's hybrid practice as curators, collaborators, art reviewers, and artists themselves. We will read hybrid works, text-based artwork, poems, and prose that push past collaboration and toward mutual entanglement.

In poetry, contemporary art is often discussed in terms of ekphrasis. Our panel envisions a greater entanglement with creative practice beyond writing. The panel is of interest to writers who wish to engage with creative practice outside their writing. In particular, writers interested in collaboration will gain a sense of potential in working across aesthetic, ethnic, and class boundaries. As a group of writers from diverse backgrounds, our work engages questions of power and community.

Speakers
JS

Jared Stanley

Jared Stanley is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently EARS. Recent poetry and prose have appeared in the New York Times, The Brooklyn Rail, Harvard Review, Make Magazine, and PoetryNow. He teaches in the MFA program at the University of Nevada, Reno.
avatar for Leora Fridman

Leora Fridman

Leora Fridman is a writer and educator based in Oakland. She's author of My Fault, selected by Eileen Myles for the Cleveland State University Press First Book Prize, in addition to other books of poetry, prose and translation. Her work appears or is forthcoming in the Millions, the... Read More →
DR

Dorothy R. Santos

Lecturer and Curator, UC Santa Cruz
Dorothy R. Santos is a Filipina American writer, curator, and researcher whose academic interests include digital art, computational media, and biotechnology. Born and raised in San Francisco, California, she holds Bachelor’s degrees in Philosophy and Psychology from the University... Read More →
avatar for Anne Lesley Selcer

Anne Lesley Selcer

Anne Lesley Selcer is the author of Sun Cycle, winner of the CSU Poetry Center Press First Book Award, and Blank Sign Book, a collection of essays on art, both released in 2019. Her chapbook From a Book of Poems on Beauty won the Gazing Grain award. Art writing includes Banlieusard... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
UW1-040 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

Failure Biographies
Blending reading, performance, and multimedia spectacle, this panel brings together four wide-ranging writer-artists to explore failure as a productive space.

The presented works resonate with what Jack Halberstam describes in The Queer Art of Failure as “the unregulated territories of failure”: an anti-capitalist and potentially revolutionary landscape. The incorporation of failure into artistic practice offers potential for “new rationales for knowledge production, different aesthetic standards for ordering or disordering space, other modes of political engagement than those conjured by the liberal imagination.” To willfully inhabit “territories of failure,” in other words, offers potential for alternate, counter-hegemonic modes of production.

How, then, can we begin to map these territories? How might failure illuminate a path towards the future in a moment when we appear to have none?

In this panel, four writer-artists—each working across a variety of mediums and forms—will share poetry, prose, comics, and video that engage with failure as a positive and inherently political space of creation.

Speakers
avatar for Vidhu Aggarwal

Vidhu Aggarwal

Associate Professor, Rollins College
Vidhu Aggarwal’s poetry and multimedia practices engage with world-building, video, and comic book media, and draw from mythic schemas from contemporary science, popular culture, and ancient texts. Her poetry book The Trouble with Humpadori (2016) imagines a cosmic mythological... Read More →
avatar for Johnny Damm

Johnny Damm

Johnny Damm is the author of The Science of Things Familiar (The Operating System), chosen by the Publishers Weekly Critics Poll as one of the best graphic novels of 2017, and chapbooks including Your Favorite Song (Essay Press). His comics, diagrams, visual poetry, and prose have... Read More →
avatar for Michael Tod Edgerton

Michael Tod Edgerton

Edgerton, San Jose State English Dept
Michael Tod Edgerton is a queer poet and author of the collection Vitreous Hide from Lavender Ink press (https://www.lavenderink.org/site/shop/vitreous-hide) . His poems have appeared previously as the winner of the Boston Review and Five Fingers Review contests, and in Coconut, Denver... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
UW2-021 Dance Studio 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

Visual Poetics
How can visual texts offer alternate forms of meaning-making and collective living? Three panelists discuss the effects of image consumption on our digital and material realities.

Austin Brady and Daniel Uncapher’s “IMAGE/TEXT//INTER/NET: The Content-Soaked Memes of Production” explores some of the creative possibilities of Instagram-oriented imagetext poetry and the procedural elements of content aggregation, condensation, and co-creation. They combine centuries of experimental techniques—like erasure, cut-up, assemblage, meme play, and more—to their imagetexts, along with the visual and textual content of private and digital lives, to rapidly reorient traditional ideas of engagement, accessibility, connectivity, interactivity, and community in the ever-mutating space of the internet.

Nico Vassilakis’ “Reading Seeing and the Letter” asks: What are we looking at when we’re looking at what we’re looking at? The only material is Seen. Only the material is Seen. Seen, unseen, what an eye might see. Two e's, two e's, s_ _n to be. The eye will track. The orb will float till it finds its oar and focused boat. Seeing the former left behind, a past tense of alphabets touching aqueous humor. A sequence comprised entirely of having seen and seeing it too. Letters seek liberty from word supremacy. Will detach from word and roam the page. Will find new designs to thwart their word captor. Will unhinge entirely and emerge alongside natural formations. Only then. Will the letters offer to return, to reconvene. Will reassemble. Will re enter the word template. Will be poured into WORD meaning, the slots of which letters attend.

Speakers
AB

Austin Brady

Austin Brady (@motorcitywolves) was born in the cold midwestern town of Gaylord, Michigan and lived the majority of his life in the Detroit area. He received his BFA from the College for Creative Studies in Detroit, Michigan with a concentration in painting, and received his MFA in... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Uncapher

Daniel Uncapher

I'm a disabled bisexual from North Mississippi whose work is particularly interested in whiteness, queerness, capital, and climate change.
avatar for Nico Vassilakis

Nico Vassilakis

Nico Vassilakis is the author of several books of poetry. He co-edited The Last Vispo Anthology: Visual Poetry 1998-2008 (Fantagraphics Books) with Crag Hill. He was also a founder of Seattle's long-running Subtext reading series.  His text-based work concerns the visual phenomenology... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
UW1-121 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

Fiction Collective Two: Performance & Conversation
Fiction Collective Two (FC2) has been a leading publisher of experimental writing for over 40 years. Its mission is to reinvent itself continuously by publishing fictions that keep the possibilities of language vivid and nimble and that dismantle assumed points of view. FC2 authors include, among many others, Samuel Delany, Fanny Howe, Stephen Graham Jones, Diane Williams, Amelia Gray, and Vi Khi Nao. FC2 books make a case for the inexhaustibility of literary forms and, taken together, show a radical and energizing diversity of perspectives, aesthetics, subjects, and styles. This hybrid event will feature short readings from authors brand new to the Collective as well as from authors who joined the Collective at the turn of the 21st century. After the reading, the panelists will discuss literary experimentalism today. What constitutes “the experimental” now, as we hurtle toward a new decade? Participants will discuss the past and present of FC2 in the context of larger literary, social, and political movements and invite the audience into a collaborative, speculative conversation about the future of fiction.

Speakers
DD

Darcie Dennigan

Darcie Dennigan is an award-winning poet and playwright whose books include Madame X and The Parking Lot and other feral scenarios. She lives in Providence, RI.
avatar for Jennifer Natalya Fink

Jennifer Natalya Fink

Georgetown University
Jennifer Natalya Fink is the author of five critically acclaimed novels, including the Dana Award-winning The Mikvah Queen and Lambda-finalist and Doctorow-prize winning Bhopal Dance. She is an associate professor at Georgetown University, where she teaches creative writing and co-founded... Read More →
avatar for Carol Guess

Carol Guess

Professor of English, Western Washington University
Carol Guess is the author of twenty books of poetry and prose, including Tinderbox Lawn, Darling Endangered, and Doll Studies: Forensics. A frequent collaborator who delights in crossing genre boundaries, Guess teaches Creative Writing and Queer Studies at Western Washington University... Read More →
EH

Evelyn Hampton

Evelyn Hampton is the author of two full-length story collections and a novella. She has an MA in Rhetoric from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, an MFA from Brown University, and is currently a PhD student at the University of Denver.
avatar for Michael Mejia

Michael Mejia

Assistant Professor, University of Utah
Michael Mejia is the author of the novels TOKYO and Forgetfulness, both published by FC2, and his fiction and nonfiction have appeared in many journals and anthologies, including AGNI, DIAGRAM, The Collagist, Seneca Review, My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me, and Angels... Read More →
LO

Lance Olsen

Lance Olsen is author of more than 25 books of and about innovative writing, including the forthcoming novel My Red Heave (Dzanc, 2020). His short stories, essays, and reviews have appeared in hundreds of journals and anthologies, such as Conjunctions, Black Warrior Review, Fiction... Read More →
AS

Aurelie Sheehan

Aurelie Sheehan is the author of two novels and three story collections. Her short fiction has appeared in Alaska Quarterly, Conjunctions, Fence, The Mississippi Review, New England Review, Ploughshares, and The Southern Review. She teaches fiction at the University of Arizona.
ES

Elisabeth Sheffield

Elisabeth Sheffield is the author of three novels, all published by FC2: Helen Keller Really Lived (2014), Fort Da: A Report (2009), and Gone (2003). Additionally, her work has appeared in various venues such as Ploughshares, the Denver Quarterly, Pretext, 13th Moon, Gulf Coast and... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
DISC-061 Auditorium 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

Asymptotic Convergence, Restless Slippage: Roundtable on the Work of Nathaniel Mackey
The four-decade-spanning work of poet, novelist and scholar Nathaniel Mackey, one of &Now’s featured speakers this year, instantiates an exemplary Point of Convergence –though calling it a “point” might be too precise a trope for a body of work that revels in restless slippage, self-adjacency, asymptotic reach that acknowledges absence and loss, divergence, pervergence and multivergence as constitutive of convergence. In Mackey’s work convergence as synesthesia brings together the sonic and linear vibrations of speech and music as well as the visual properties of syntactic writing and asemic, naturally occurring forms of inscription. As well, historic and cosmological planes converge in a complex durée that situates his fiction, poetry, and critical scholarship in multiple temporal scales. Moreover, the syncretism so characteristic of diasporic cultural expression finds a kind of apotheosis in his virtuosic literary achievement.

In a roundtable (itself a convergence of minds) intended to give potential and extant readers a range of entry-points into Mackey’s work, three poet/scholars (Erica Hunt, Joseph Donahue, Jeanne Heuving), and two poetry scholars (Maria Damon and Adalaide Morris), all of whom have written on Mackey’s work, will discuss their own relationships to and entries into Mackey’s work, possibly speaking from a forthcoming book of essays on his work to which a number of us have contributed, and then include the audience in trying to expand even further the ways in which Mackey’s work can be approached, if never entirely grasped (an asymptotic relationship to it feels consistent with his ethic and aesthetic, and also with the readerly humility necessary to venture into his verbal thicket).

Speakers
WA

Will Alexander

Poet, Individual
Will Alexander is a poet, novelist, essayist, aphorist, playwright, visual artist, and pianist. He is author of over 30 books and chapbooks, and is both a Whiting Fellow and a California Arts Council Fellow. In addition, he has been recipient of a PEN Oakland Award, and an American... Read More →
MD

Maria Damon

Maria Damon teaches poetry, poetics and literature at Pratt Institute of Art. She is the author of several books of poetry scholarship and chapbooks of cross-stitch visual poetry, co-author (with mIEKAL aND, Jukka-Pekka Kervinen, Adeena Karasick and Alan Sondheim) of several books... Read More →
JD

Joseph Donahue

Joseph Donahue is the author of seven volumes of poetry, most recently Dark Church (Verge Editions) and Red Flash on a Black Field (Black Square Editions). He is the co-translator, with the author, of Zhang Er's First Mountain. A new collection of his poems, Wind Maps I-VII is forthcoming... Read More →
JH

Jeanne Heuving

Jeanne Heuving’s recent critical books are The Transmutation of Love and Avant-Garde Poetics published in the Modern and Contemporary Poetics Series at the University of Alabama Press and the essay collection, Inciting Poetics: Thinking and Writing Poetry, co-edited with Tyrone... Read More →
avatar for Erica Hunt

Erica Hunt

Parsons Family Professor of Creative Writing, Long Island University--Brooklyn
Erica Hunt works at the forefront of experimental poetry and poetics, critical race theory, and feminist aesthetics. She has written three books of poetry: Arcade, with artist Alison Saar, Piece Logic, and Local History (Roof Books, 1993). Her published and forthcoming essays include... Read More →
AM

Adalaide Morris

Adalaide Morris, Professor Emerita at the University of Iowa, writes on the expanded field of modern and contemporary poetics. She is the author of How to Live / What to Do: H.D.’s Cultural Poetics and has published an edited collection of essays, Sound States: Innovative Poetics... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
DISC-252 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

Poetics as Play and Possibility: An Interactive Workshop
In an era of intense social and political division and pain, play is as necessary as poetry. An interactive, interdisciplinary poetics of possibility through play can help us negotiate conflict and heal in, through, and with heartbreak—both intimate personal heartbreak and that of living in our historical moment. This manner of serious play is especially important in at-risk/marginalized communities, where failure, chance, and possibility are bound to individuals’ health and happiness, yet are often shaped by systems beyond their control.


Lauren Russell’s “Between a Dragonfly & an Osprey” arises out of a moment of rupture that is also possibility, when a sonnet crown must be redesigned as a twelve-sided die because love is a game of chance. When Lauren invites audience members to roll the die, both the creation of the narrative and the Poetry Reading itself are transformed into an interactive experience. In Keith Wilson’s “Love,” a digital interactive love poem, heartbreak, healing, and memory are imagined as a flower drying in a vase that, even under scrutiny, changes every day. Keith’s creative card game, “Once Upon a Tale,” created for Lurie Children’s Hospital’s cardiac floor, was designed to facilitate physical healing through positive collaborative storytelling, while the generative writing exercises and games Lauren Russell brings to a locked psychiatric unit can be transformative for patients who did not previously think of themselves as writers.


In this workshop, we will share some of our approaches to play, games, and possibility in poetry and then invite participants to take part in a hands-on, collaborative poem-making/playing activity we are calling Word Constellations. All that is required is paper, a writing implement, and an open mind. We’ll bring the rest.

Sign up by adding to your SCHED.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Russell

Lauren Russell

Research Assistant Professor/Assistant Director, Center for African American Poetry and Poetics, University of Pittsburgh
Lauren Russell is the author of What’s Hanging on the Hush (Ahsahta, 2017) an Descent (Tarpaulin Sky, 2020). A 2017 NEA Creative Writing Fellow in Poetry, she has received fellowships and residencies from Cave Canem, The Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, VIDA/The Home School... Read More →
KS

Keith S. Wilson

Keith S. Wilson is a game designer, Affrilachian Poet, Cave Canem fellow, and graduate of the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop. He has received an NEA Grant, three scholarships from Bread Loaf, and scholarships from MacDowell, UCross, Millay Colony, and the Vermont Studio Center... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
UW1-060 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

4:15pm

4:30pm

4:45pm

Keynote Presentation by Barbara Browning
Barbara Browning teaches in the Department of Performance Studies at NYU. She’s the author of three academic books (Samba: Resistance in MotionInfectious Rhythm: Metaphors of Contagion and the Spread of African Culture, and Caetano Veloso: A Foreign Sound) as well as three ficto-critical novels (The Correspondence Artist, I’m Trying to Reach You, and The Gift (or, Techniques of the Body)). With Sébastien Régnier, she co-authored a work of auto-fiction à quatre mains, Who the Hell is Imre Lodbrog? She also maintains a performance practice, both solo and collaborative.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Browning

Barbara Browning

Barbara Browning teaches in the Department of Performance Studies at NYU. She’s the author of three academic books (Samba: Resistance in Motion, Infectious Rhythm: Metaphors of Contagion and the Spread of African Culture, and Caetano Veloso: A Foreign Sound) as well as three ficto-critical... Read More →


Friday September 20, 2019 4:45pm - 6:15pm
Mobius Hall Theater 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011
 
Saturday, September 21
 

8:30am

8:30am

Registration
The registration table will be available in North Creek Event Center. Come and pick up your program, badge, and other materials.

If you are arriving for the 5pm keynote, registration will be available at 4:45pm in Mobius Hall.

Saturday September 21, 2019 8:30am - 4:30pm
North Creek Events Center 18325 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

A Collaboration of Amateurs
A collaboration of amateurs is a collaboratively-authored cento composed of language lifted from texts encountered in our spring, 2019 writing workshop and then gifted to the group in a gesture of shelter, protection, and love. Inspired by Barbara Browning's The Gift, we approached this collaboration in the spirit of amateurism: we selected language that inspired us and transmuted it into a new medium, one in which we are dabblers, newcomers, and passionate neophytes. We embraced the idea of inappropriate intimacy in gathering these materials and in stitching them together into an intimate artifact. This is a gift we give one another as a record of the places we have gone as individuals and as a class in BCWRIT 501,  Between Fact and Imagination, Spring 2019.
It reflects our immersion in the following texts:
  • Jordan Abel, Injun (Talonbooks, 2016)
  • Barbara Browning, The Gift (Coffee House Press, 2017)
  • Julie Carr, Real Life: An Installation (Omnidawn, 2018)
  • Diana Khoi Nguyen, Ghost Of (Omnidawn, 2018)
  • Jena Osman, Public Figures (Wesleyan UP, 2014)
  • Khadijah Queen, I’m so Fine (YesYes Books, 2017)
  • Cecilia Vicuña, Spit Temple (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2012)


Saturday September 21, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
Mobius Art Gallery 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

Blue Monologue
“One feels his two-ness, —an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.” –W. E. B. DuBois, “Striving of the Negro People.”

Blue Monologue is a video triptych. In it, an “American” and a “Negro” dispassionately observe a third, centered, figure. The outermost two are differentiated only by their apparel—one dressed as a lay person, the other in an ambiguous blue uniform.

Both attempt to “place” the center figure, also in uniform, who grooves soulfully to inaudible music. Together, they consider: is she insufficiently identifying as “blue” (American) by over identifying as black? Or does the blue uniform thwart her claim on the darker color?

Although alone in her unadorned room, the center figure moves self-consciously into and out of the frame, seemingly captured by the unrelenting double gaze. By dancing, she investigates her sovereignty—as a diasporic black woman and an American—while the adjacent two look on, their frames spliced intermittently with inter-titles, chronicling and scrutinizing every facet of her form.

Throughout, all three figures are illuminated by a television’s blue light. The blinking glow reminds the audience of a network of audiences; those two adjacent surveyors are now, also, subjects of surveillance.

In image, movement, and text, Blue Monologue asks: how do we “feel [her] two-ness”? Or rather, how do we use intersections of race, gender, class, and nationality to better see one another without reinforcing prisons of identity?

Speakers
JS

Jo Stewart

Jo Stewart is a movement-theater artist, poet, and educator. She uses a combination of gesture, voice, and improvisational scores to make work that meets notions of blackness with queered mythologies. She has previously been an artist in residence at Azule (2019), the Old American... Read More →
LE

Lyndsay Ellis Bloom

Lyndsay Ellis Bloom (b. Florida, USA) is a filmmaker and artist working in experimental cinema and film installation. Bloom’s process involves putting media archeology into practice, investigating the physical properties of celluloid film, and considering intersections between the... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
DISC-165B 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

Breathe the Machine
The FaaS were future-oriented. Every day, they contemplated the question: what kind of ancestor will you be?

Prose writer Teresa Carmody, new media artist Matt Roberts, 3-D animator Dengke Chen, and poet Terri Witek will repurpose computers in an existing Bothell lab to respond to human breath. Each transformation will become part of a larger story built from the computers’ individual data--every breath will both create an onscreen reaction (individual computers) and change an animated world just to one side of our own (projected on large screen/wall) . Participants will move from computer to computer and breath by breath build a world that unfolds on the room’s large screen. Simple biological actions, then, will momentarily converge human and mechanical worlds.

Their conceiving mind quit avoiding their body; their body, they realized, had already FaaD.

Donna Haraway is just one theorist who argues that as we acquire more mechanical parts, and as technology takes on increasingly human functions, we should become more actively hopeful about interspecies interactions. Breathe the Machine challenges us to think of even anonymous, institutionally controlled screens as partners in new, combinatory narratives that converge technology and the human into non-hostile, resilient allies. A computer lab, then, becomes an interactive installation, an archive, a fiction, a world and a landscape. A prompt.

This is how we morph.

Speakers
TC

Teresa Carmody

Teresa Carmody is the author of Maison Femme: a fiction (2015) and Requiem (2005). Her work has appeared in The Collagist, Big Fiction, Two Serious Ladies, St. Petersburg Review, Faultline, Entropy, and more. Carmody is co-founding editor of Les Figues Press, an imprint of LARB Books... Read More →
DC

Dengke Chen

Dengke Chen is currently Assistant Professor of Digital Arts, Stetson University, Florida. His practice concentrates on new media art, 3D animation, computer games, and comic art. Unlike the single narrative storytelling techniques used in traditional animations to amuse and entertain... Read More →
MR

Matt Roberts

Associate Professor of Digital Art, Stetson Univeristy
Matt Roberts is a new media artist whose work has been featured internationally and nationally, including shows in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Italy, Mexico, Portugal, Scotland, Taiwan, and nationally in New York, San Francisco, Miami, and Chicago. His work has been featured... Read More →
avatar for Terri Witek

Terri Witek

Terri Witek is the author of 6 books of poems, most recently The Rape Kit (2018), winner of the Slope Editions Prize judged by Dawn Lundy Martin. She has collaborated with visual artists throughout her career: works with Brazilian visual artist Cyriaco Lopes include gallery shows... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
UW2-121 Digital Media Lab 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

CURB (an artists' book by Divya Victor, printed and bound by Aaron Cohick)
Throughout the conference (and in conjunction with a panel featuring performance, critical talks, and discussions of the book) we would like to exhibit copies of CURB by Divya Victor. Produced by Aaron Cohick of The Press at Colorado College, CURB is an artists’ book made through the convergence between documentary poetics and the possibilities of structure and legibility in the handmade book. The binding is a double-sided accordion-fold spine, with sewn-in chapbooks and fold-outs. The printing incorporates a traditional, carefully crafted approach to typography and letterpress printing; a complete reversal of those traditions through repetitive overprinting; and direct rubbings made from sidewalks and curbs, imprinting the pages with a textural trace of concrete.

The book explores how racial and national identities diverge, rupture, and converge in the threshold zones of semi-public spaces—sidewalks, verges, lawns—and in places of quotidian consumption—gas stations, bars, green spaces—which it understands as sites of discipline and surveillance. CURB documents the killing and assault of Indian-Americans and Indian immigrants in post Reagan America through to the Trump era to query how urban spaces defend against the foreign subject so as to mark and claim a pending corpse or carceral entity.

Making copies of the book available for attendees to interact with would allow them to explore the author and book artist’s engagement with how we imagine ourselves as converging and diverging in shared, public spaces. How does “nationhood,” as a production, attempt to manage, curb, or fetishize ongoing cultural convergence through acts of violence? How do these acts unfold in shared public spaces? How might a book’s architecture and facture open multiple layers of reading, challenge oppressive habits of textual engagement and sense-making, and welcome collaboration and convergent peership through reading practices and physical engagement with the book?

Speakers
AC

Aaron Cohick

Aaron Cohick is a letterpress printer/artist/publisher based in Colorado Springs, CO. His work focuses on the intersection of experimental typography/printing, writing, and artists’ publications. He is the founder and proprietor of the NewLights Press and is the Printer of The Press... Read More →
avatar for Divya Victor

Divya Victor

Asst. Prof., Nanyang Technological University
Divya Victor is the author of CURB (Press at Colorado College), KITH (Fence Books/ Book Thug), a book of verse, prose memoir, lyric essay and visual objects; NATURAL SUBJECTS (Trembling Pillow, Winner of the Bob Kaufman Award), UNSUB (Insert Blanc), and THINGS TO DO WITH YOUR MOUTH... Read More →
avatar for CJ Martin

CJ Martin

CJ Martin lives in Colorado Springs, Colorado and is a poet, bookbinder, letterpress printer and sometimes a publicist. He is the author of Two Books (Compline Press, 2010) as well as numerous chapbooks. With Julia Drescher, he publishes poetry and art titles from Further Other Book... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
Mobius Art Gallery 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

Home is a Flame Surrounded
“Foul Chutes” is an immersive exhibit. The text of the piece is an essay displayed on a 50ft scroll suspended vertically on fishing line, in the shape of a spiral. The text itself is designed in the concrete shape of the Mississippi River, seen from above. When a reader walks to the center of the spiral, they find a pitcher and a water basin, containing water from the Mississippi River.

The two parallel “strands” of text trace the history of the Mississippi River Basin by tracing its trash—the evidence of those who have lived alongside the river, and reveals that the history of river trash is a history of violence. The essay also traces a friendship between two women, and the trip they take to explore an abandoned “Mississippi River Model,” a concrete scale-model left to decay in Buddy Butts park outside Jackson, MS.

“Foul Chutes” is part of a genre of installed texts that aim to interrupt traditional modes of spending time with art by inviting an audience to participate in meaning-making through fragments, visuals, and movement. “Foul Chutes” invites readers and lookers alike to consider how the shape a text takes on can dictate the stories it is allowed to deliver. This essay was first exhibited as part of a week-long exhibit of visual essays at the Trissolini Gallery in Athens, OH.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Minor

Sarah Minor

Assistant Professor of Creative Writing, Cleveland Institute of Art
Sarah Minor is the author of The Persistence of The Bonyleg: Annotated (Essay Press, 2016) and a collection of visual essays forthcoming from Rescue Press (2020). She has exhibited installations of essays at The University of Arizona Historical Society in Tucson, AZ (2014), Blue Mark... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
Mobius Art Gallery 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

The Ambrose J and Vivian T Seagrave Museum of 20th Century Art
The Ambrose J and Vivian T Seagrave Museum of 20th Century Art (Acre Books/University of Cincinnati Press, 2019) is a novel told mostly in the form of exhibit labels for art in a fictional museum. As an experiment in formal appropriation and constraint, the novel explores the convergence of art, museum, and narrative through the limit of the exhibit label. The ekphrastic novel interrogates the relationship between curator, museum, art, visitor, and narrative through descriptions written by an increasingly unstable curator. Juxtaposed with the narrative of a museum visitor with a personal connection to the displayed art, the novel provides multiple, often oppositional, perspectives on the role of the museum, collective and individual memory, and how value is assigned to artwork.

In 2020, the University of Cincinnati College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning will host an exhibit of art created from the labels in the novel by artists commissioned for the project. At &Now, I will create a companion exhibit by displaying labels from the novel alone on a blank wall. By presenting the label on a blank wall, the exhibit inverts the traditional experience of the museum. Rather than making meaning of art via its supplemental information, the exhibit asks viewers to imagine art using only a description of its materials and prescribed meaning.

Speakers
MK

Matt Kirkpatrick

Matthew Kirkpatrick is the author of The Ambrose J. and Vivian T. Seagrave Museum of 20th Century American Art (Acre Books), The Exiles (Ricochet Editions), and Light Without Heat (FC2). His fiction and essays have appeared in The Rumpus, The Common, Puerto del Sol, Denver Quarterly... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
Mobius Art Gallery 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

The Mueller Report as Poetic Text
As of May 2019, U.S. democracy is wounded by our elected representatives’ and the public’s willful illiteracy in refusing to read the 448-page heavily redacted Mueller report, investigating Russian interference into the 2016 election, the installation of Donald Trump as President, Trump’s collaboration with Russian forces, and his ensuing obstruction of the investigations. The people of this country are represented by a complicit party and a complacent party, both content to let the facts of an illegitimate president’s rise and continued corruption go the way of other outmoded literary technologies, with the actual report getting little more actual reading attention than even small press poetry publications.

The spin campaign of tweets and short statements that directly contradict and obfuscate the facts of the report have thus far triumphed in capturing the daily news cycle “narrative,” which favors flash over boredom, broadness over nuance. The Mueller report, and Mueller himself, lack the sound-bite snap necessary to sway public opinion. As William Carlos Williams predicted, “It is difficult to get the news from poems / yet men die miserable every day / for lack / of what is found there.”

Months after its release, the substantive report remains largely unread, like a required book on a student reading list, yet not like that at all. Our project--a filmed reading of the full report by poets and writers--acknowledges the literary value of the political text and the power of speech. Recognizing that real world politics may change by the time of "&Now" in September 2019, we welcome the altered meanings a shifting context will provide in our gallery presentation of the video, with 2-3 minute filmed readings of the report by over 100 luminous contemporary writers and friends of 1913 Press, giving voice to the most important literary document of our time.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Doller

Ben Doller

Assistant Professor, UCSD, Designer/Vice Editor, 1913, etcetera
Ben Doller’s most recent book of poems is Fauxhawk (Wesleyan University Press). Together with the writer Sandra Doller, he wrote the collaborative memoir, The Yesterday Project (Sidebrow Books). He is Associate Professor in the Literature Department at University of California... Read More →
SD

Sandra Doller

Sandra Doller's most recent book is Leave Your Body Behind (Les Figues Press). Together with the poet Ben Doller, she wrote the collaborative anti-memoir, The Yesterday Project (Sidebrow Books). She is an Associate Professor of Literature & Writing and Film Studies at California State... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
Mobius Art Gallery 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

The Museum of Alternative History Pop-Up Exhibit
Speakers
avatar for Tim Guthrie

Tim Guthrie

Professor, Creighton University
Tim Guthrie is an Omaha-based multi-media visual artist and experimental filmmaker. His work has been awarded Independent Artist Fellowships in 2011, 2008, 2007 and 2006 (Distinguished Artist, Filmmaker) from the Nebraska Arts Council for both his traditional and digital art, experimental... Read More →
DS

Davis Schneiderman

Provost and Dean of the Faculty / Lake Forest College, Lake Forest College
Davis Schneiderman is Krebs Provost and Dean of the Faculty, and Professor of English at Lake Forest College. He is the author or editor of more than 10 books. His first short-story collection, there is no appropriate #emoji, will be released in Fall 2019, and his recent novels BLANK... Read More →
AO

Andi Olsen

Andi Olsen is a video, assemblage and collage artist whose works have been shown in museums, galleries and film festivals in the U.S. and Europe. She is known for her hybrid works that combine literature, video and objects. More at www.andiolsen.com.


Saturday September 21, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
Mobius Hall Foyer 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

Visualizing & Performing Poetry
My early fall class is an intensive workshop style course intended to challenge students to create a sense of experimentation and transformation with their existing written works. The course integrates attendance and participation at the "&Now" Conference as essential to the coursework and we will additionally study the works of the keynote speakers in advance of the conference. An exhibition of the student works will be included in the "&Now" program. Below is a description of the course.

Description:
BISIA 330: Visualizing and Performing Poetry
In what ways can we imagine language to perform for us beyond the page? How can we literally and figuratively pull words and pages apart to create something new where language leaps from our books and bodies? This is an advance Interdisciplinary Arts & Creative Writing class where students will create works rooted in writing but intended to be experienced as a performance or visual work of art (ie installation, film, textile/fiber art, book art and etc.) Students who enroll in this intensive workshop-based art class will come to the course with some existing writings (prose, poetry, song, etc). We will then workshop and discuss your writings, compositions and intentions. From there, you will work to further examine and transform your writings into a new performative or visual experimentation. Students will then have a chance to participate and present their final works at the “&Now” Festival of Innovative Writing hosted this year at UWBothell from Sept 19 – 21, 2019; Conference Theme: “Points of Convergence.” Our class integrates conference attendance as part of the required coursework.

Speakers
avatar for Anida Yoeu Ali

Anida Yoeu Ali

Artist-in-Residence, UWBothell
Anida Yoeu Ali is an artist whose works span performance, installation, new media, public encounters, and political agitation. She is a first generation Muslim Khmer woman born in Cambodia and raised in Chicago. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to artmaking, her installation... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 8:30am - 5:00pm
HH-1310 Gallery 10909 NE 185th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Convergence and Divergence
How do we tread along a path that can both unite and deviate? Four panelists discuss formulations and the unreliable and/or emancipatory routes that they take.

In practice, the mainstream (Iowa) model of the writing education is that of the writing workshop. How can we, as a community, write and edit not fascism as we imagine it but fascism as it is now? Yanyi’s "Editing and the Fascist Impulse" will discuss the case of Toby Martinez de la Rivas and POETRY deciding to publish his poem “Black Sun,” close-read by Roy Guzmán to have an alarming number of fascist images. He will explore whether there is such a thing as fascist poetry and how does one anticipate or respond to its appearance, or the impulse to find it, as an editor of one’s own work and the work of others?

Brian Evenson will discuss his paper, "The Acrobatically Abject Fiction of Gary Lutz," which explores the short fiction of Lutz by examining the way in which his work has developed from his earliest book to his most recent work. It will examine his use of archaism, the progressive sobering of his mood, the way in which he uses unusual word combinations, and the use of extremely precise words and formulations to nevertheless create obliquity. Evenson will argue how Lutz is one of the most important post-minimalist writers, and one well worthy of attention.

Judith Goldman’s paper "Fallible narration, epistemic violence, and sadomasochism in Samantha Giles's Total Recall" considers paradigms of unreliable narration, epistemic violence, and gendered sadomasochism, as they converge with great power and insight. Goldman will discuss how the work presents a fierce feminist critique of the misogynist cultural gaslighting of women regarding sexual violence and how Giles diagnoses a culture marked by an incapacity for guilt and a pathological, victim-blaming deflection of the source of its own violence.

Robert Mittenthal’s talk on "Convergence Insufficiency: Emancipatory Thought" will explain the condition that causes double or blurred vision and how this plays into disciplines being activated by problems, along with the susceptibility of the humanities towards incompatibilities over the sciences. Mittenthal will explore to what extent these incongruities can be explained as a rift between those desiring a truly emancipatory project, and those who do not by figuring out how one identifies as an individual which can interfere with working out a broader definition of the problems that activate creators in pursuit of emancipatory thought and theory.

Speakers
avatar for Yanyi 

Yanyi 

Poet
Yanyi is a writer and critic. In 2018, he won the Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize, awarded by Carl Phillips, for his first book, The Year of Blue Water (Yale University Press, April 2019). The recipient of fellowships from Asian American Writers Workshop and Poets House, his work... Read More →
BE

Brian Evenson

Brian Evenson is the author of more than a dozen books of fiction, most recently the story collection Songs for the End of the World (2019). His novel Last Days won the 2009 ALA-RUSA Award. His novel The Open Curtain (Coffee House Press) was a finalist for an Edgar Award and an IHG... Read More →
JG

Judith Goldman

Judith Goldman is an Associate Professor in the Department of English and Director of the Poetics Program at SUNY, Buffalo.  She has published four books of poetry, including most recently agon (The Operating System 2017) and has read and performed her work nationally and internationally... Read More →
RM

Robert Mittenthal

Robert Mittenthal is author of Wax World (Chax), and a variety of chapbooks.  He was instrumental in creating and curating the Subtext Reading Series (1995-2009) in Seattle, and since the financial collapse has been working to induce collective thought via a series of related reading... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW1-010 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Difficult Women: Acceptance and Accessibility
Now that more women are publishing on experimental presses — and starting their own presses — the craft of experimental writing is becoming more diverse. In a world where difficult women are seldom cherished in the style of difficult men, how do we understand accessibility in experimental writing, where the prose often challenges the reader to the point of difficulty? Are women sometimes punished for difficulty and lack of accessibility in ways that their male counterparts are not?  How do accessibility and convergence coincide? Does accessibility or content have more urgency in a world of potential or essential convergence?  And if it’s more essential now than ever for women to tell their stories, where is the work most needed, and how will those most often sidelined be central to literary survival?

Female experimental authors at different stages of their careers, including professors and PhD students as well as emerging writers and writers with multiple books, discuss the changing aesthetics of experimental prose, craft, and gender diversity in publishing by exploring provocative subject matter as they follow in the footsteps of Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, and Djuna Barnes at a time when nontraditional publishers attempt to bring high-risk female literary works into the spotlight.

Speakers
avatar for Carol Guess

Carol Guess

Professor of English, Western Washington University
Carol Guess is the author of twenty books of poetry and prose, including Tinderbox Lawn, Darling Endangered, and Doll Studies: Forensics. A frequent collaborator who delights in crossing genre boundaries, Guess teaches Creative Writing and Queer Studies at Western Washington University... Read More →
EH

Evelyn Hampton

Evelyn Hampton is the author of two full-length story collections and a novella. She has an MA in Rhetoric from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, an MFA from Brown University, and is currently a PhD student at the University of Denver.
avatar for Aimee Parkison

Aimee Parkison

Associate Professor of Fiction Writing, Oklahoma State University
Aimee Parkison is the author of Refrigerated Music for a Gleaming Woman, which won the FC2 Catherine Doctorow Innovative Fiction Prize. Parkison teaches in the Creative Writing Program at Oklahoma State University and has published five books of fiction.
BP

Bailey Pittenger

Bailey Pittenger lives in Denver. She has an MA in English from Wake Forest University and an MFA in prose from the University of Notre Dame. She is a co-editor for pulpmouth magazine. She is currently a PhD student in Creative Writing at the University of Denver.
AS

Aurelie Sheehan

Aurelie Sheehan is the author of two novels and three story collections. Her short fiction has appeared in Alaska Quarterly, Conjunctions, Fence, The Mississippi Review, New England Review, Ploughshares, and The Southern Review. She teaches fiction at the University of Arizona.


Saturday September 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
DISC-162 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Limit Texts and Synesthesia
What can be learned from imaginative, innovative, and speculative study? Three panelists discuss aesthetics and sensorial concepts and convergences.

Ryan Bell’s "Synecdoches and Synesthesia: Gertrud Grunow, the Bauhaus, and Graphic Scores" will discuss the need for a pedagogy of synesthetic aesthetics. Beginning with a discussion of interdisciplinary concepts in Walter Gropius’ Bauhaus manifesto, followed by the scholarship of Gertrud Grunow, a musician and pedagogue. Bell aims to imagine and reconstruct an incomplete history while embarking on another challenge; virtually erased from the Bauhaus’ history, Grunow’s work can be mobilized and positioned within less obvious lineages––such as the adoption of graphic scores within experimental music. In doing so, Bell argues that it will not only rightly resituate Grunow within the history of the Bauhaus, but also reflect the interdisciplinary boundlessness that is central to her work.

Deven Philbrick’s "The Point as Limit: Convergent Readings of Marianne Moore and Robert Duncan" asks, what happens when we examine the limits of structure, for both aesthetics and politics? Philbrick proposes a convergent reading practice that examines the aesthetic and political consequences of how we read innovative works. He contends that reconsidering Philippe Sollers’ concept as a point of convergence between aesthetics and politics, and by extension, between text and reader, is fecund territory for innovative, politically salient reading practices. Philbrick will discuss these speculations about limits as a theoretical apparatus through analyzed poems by Marianne Moore and Robert Duncan.

Jason Zuzga will close read several of Barbara Guest's prose poems from her 1999 collection, The Confetti Trees and discuss how they rub against the shimmering linguistic surfaces of her other poetic works. What Guest means by the word "imagination" in her critical writings will also be considered; is she playing with the materiality of film or are the works a call to arms against them? Video interpretations of some of the poems will be crafted and shown. Zuzga will argue that Guest's work demands much more attention.

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Bell

Ryan Bell

University at Buffalo
Ryan Bell is a writer and scholar currently pursuing his PhD in English at SUNY Buffalo. He is primarily interested in the history of the avant-garde, sound studies, and poetics.
avatar for Deven Philbrick

Deven Philbrick

Deven Philbrick is a PhD student in English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, where he studies modernist poetry and poetics, experimental/avant-garde literature, and the intersections between philosophy and literature. He holds a BA in English and... Read More →
JZ

Jason Zuzga

Jason Zuzga completed an M.F.A. in poetry and nonfiction at the University of Arizona, followed by a year as the poet-in-residence in the James Merrill House. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania English Department for his dissertation “Uncanny World: Envisioning... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW1-121 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Shards to Mosaic: The Power of Making Art Across Disciplines
As writers we strive to create work that matters––whether by protesting wrongs, sounding alarms, or piecing together shards of our shattered world in mosaics of crazy beauty. How can immersing ourselves in other art forms support this goal? Five writers will share work that engages with performance-based artists and/or practices, from postmodern dance to innovative theater to sound work to performance art. Following the presentations, panelists will participate in an open forum, discussing the risks, challenges, and pleasures of this investigation and exploring how it stretches their self-definition and supports or shifts their goals for their art.

Speakers
SA

Samuel Ace

Samuel Ace is a trans/genderqueer poet and sound artist. He is the author of several books, most recently Our Weather Our Sea (Black Radish), the re-issued Meet Me There: Normal Sex and Home in three days. Don’t wash., (Belladonna* Germinal Texts), and Stealth with poet Maureen... Read More →
avatar for Laura Christina Dunn

Laura Christina Dunn

Artistic Director, Broken Planetarium
Laura Christina Dunn holds an MFA in poetry from the University of Montana. She is the 2015 recipient of the Oregon Literary Fellowship. Her poems have appeared in journals such as Fugue, At Length, The Bear Deluxe, Fact-Simile, and Zocalo Public Square. In 2015, her chapbook Spider... Read More →
avatar for Sawako Nakayasu

Sawako Nakayasu

Assistant Professor, Brown University
Sawako Nakayasu is an artist working with language, performance, and translation – separately and in various combinations. She has lived mostly in the US and Japan, briefly in France and China, and translates from Japanese. Her books include The Ants (Les Figues Press), Texture... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Rosenthal

Sarah Rosenthal

Sarah Rosenthal is the author of Lizard (Chax, 2016), Manhatten (Spuyten Duyvil, 2009), and several chapbooks, including The Grass Is Greener When the Sun Is Yellow, a collaboration with Valerie Witte engaging the work of dancer-choreographers Simone Forti and Yvonne Rainer (Operating... Read More →
avatar for Valerie Witte

Valerie Witte

Valerie Witte is the author of a game of correspondence (Black Radish Books) and three chapbooks, most recently The Grass Is Greener When the Sun Is Yellow (Operating System), a collaboration with Sarah Rosenthal. In 2014 she began a collaboration with Chicago-based artist Jennifer... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
DISC-061 Auditorium 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Toward Topological Poetics, Media & Materiality, and the Impossibility of a Desaturated Media Environment
To say we live in media-saturated times would be an understatement, but it would also be a mistake to think “more mediated” than others. What would a world desaturated of mediation look like? Impossible. Rather than lament our media-saturation, poetics can interrogate the way communications travel through an always-already media-saturated world of substances. Poets don’t just write language, they build mediated infrastructures of possible communications, or impossible communications, that re-render Language’s conditions of possibility: the substance we live in and are surrounded by and are. This panel suggests media and language as co-constitutive of a topological poetics: a poetics that refuses distance in favor of an immanent critical examination of the language, poetry, and media our bodies, and our poems, are made of.

This panel will include Amanda Hurtado presenting S ACE   P, demonstrating that Clark Coolidge’s SPACE is based on a carefully regulated inscriptive network at the intersection of the disciplined body and a specific technology (the IBM composer), revealing otherwise hidden aspects of Coolidge’s compositional process. In an effort to disenchant the magical of twitterbots, Blair Johnson will examine the ramifications of technoanimism and the history of technological enchantment through a reading of two twitterbots: the lively and popular @LostTesla and Nick Montfort’s @one_algorithm. Brent Cox will present the Topological Poetics Research Institute (TPRI), a poetics “think-tank” that is a creative-critical interrogation of the “becoming-institutional” of poetry, poetics, art, and, in an epoch living under the cosmos of management and financial culture, increasingly all things. Simon Eales will present findings from this year's Ecopoetry Workshop in Val Taleggio, Italy. And Travis Sharp will present a critique of poetics of alternative materialities, including biopoetics and digital poetry, which too often offer a liberatory aesthetics of substrative distension while remaining deeply imbricated in colonial and regressive logics.

Speakers
avatar for Brent Cox

Brent Cox

Brent Cox is co-founder of the Topological Poetics Research Institute (TPRI) and the Ecopoetry Workshop in Bergamo, Italy. He is also a PhD student at the University at Buffalo Poetics Program where his work deals with investigations of surfaces that might be depths, and depths that... Read More →
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Simon Eales

Simon is from Melbourne, Australia and lives between there and Buffalo, New York, where he is a PhD student in SUNY Buffalo's Poetics Program and a teaching assistant. He holds a MA from the University of Melbourne where he was an H.B. Higgins Scholar in radical poetics. Simon is... Read More →
AH

Amanda Hurtado

Amanda Hurtado is the author of S ACE P (Editions Eclipse, 2014), and CELL (MonoD Press, 2016). She currently lives in Nederland, Colorado where she is a PhD student in English Literature at the University of Colorado, Boulder.
BJ

Blair Johnson

Blair Johnson is a poet and PhD candidate in English at the University at Buffalo. Her poems have appeared in Boston Review, DIAGRAM, and Best American Experimental Writing.
avatar for Travis Sharp

Travis Sharp

PhD Candidate, University at Buffalo, SUNY
Travis Sharp is the author of the chapbook Sinister Queer Agenda (above/ground press, 2018), the artist's book one plus one is two ones (Recreational Resources, 2018), and the forthcoming poetry book Yes, I am a corpse flower (knife fork book, 2021). He's executive editor at Essay... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW1-040 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Translation as Collaboration
How can translation be used in collaborative forms to go beyond spatial and geographical borders? Four panelists share their process of elevating narratives through multi-lingual partnerships.

In "Translationally Original," translator-writers Ali Araghi and Poupeh Missaghi will discuss collaborative projects that use experimental translational/transnational frameworks in order to provide new possibilities for addressing personal and political concerns. Each will share their approaches, one going inward to the depths of the text and the other going outward and beyond. Similarly, one using new technologies and the other using analog modes of communication to bridge geographical distance. While each of them finds various points of entry to create diffused multi-layered labyrinths where the original creators, writer-translators, and audience from different points of a historical continuum converge.

Presenting a bilingual performance drawn from Italian poet Amelia Rosselli's Obtuse Diary, Riccardo Pieri and Deborah Woodard will share the poet’s intimate, and deliberately oblique story of her return to a postwar Italy. They will explore more than the process of a back and forth explication of the original Italian, and rather pursue various ways to enact the fissures and conjoining’s of Italian and English, through switching off between who reads which language and reading simultaneously, with background murmuring in both languages, in an attempt to get to the presence of other tongues in Rosselli's work.

Speakers
AA

Ali Araghi

Ali Araghi is a fiction writer and translator. He is the editor and translator of I Am a Face Sympathizing with Your Grief (co.im.press, 2015), an anthology of seven Iranian poets. His works of fiction and translation have appeared in such journals as Prairie Schooner, Asymptote... Read More →
PM

Poupeh Missaghi

Poupeh Missaghi is a writer, a translator both into and out of Persian, Asymptote’s Iran editor-at-large, and an educator. She holds a PhD in English-creative writing from the University of Denver and an MA in creative writing from Johns Hopkins University. Her nonfiction, fiction... Read More →
RP

Riccardo Pieri

Riccardo Pieri is an actor and monologist living in Seattle.
DW

Deborah Woodard

Deborah Woodard is a poet and translator. Her most recent book is No Finis: Triangle Testimonies, 1911 (Ravenna Press, 2018). She has translated the poetry of Amelia Rosselli in The Dragonfly (Chelsea Editions, 2009), Hospital Series (New Directions, 2015) and Obtuse Diary (Entre... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW1-030 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

A Pilipinx Multiverse: Pilipinx Poetic Presence & Futurisms
This multimedia presentation/reading represents the need and the celebration for Pinay/Pilipinx and queer Pinay/Pilipinx futurisms. How can Feminist Pilipinx Futurists speculate future when so much of our past has been erased by colonization, militarization and capitalism? How do we claim agency in a homogenous North American culture when monolithic forces such as the academic institution, a globalized, capitalistic economy, or even the medical-industrial complex work against our efforts towards wellness, sustainability and upward mobility?  

This reading explores these questions through a feminist-futurist-poetics written by Pinays/Pilipinx who identify as woman, queer and/or gender nonconforming. Can a group of Pinays with a passion for X-men’s Storm and Back to the Future’s flying Delorian create an imaginary that represents and supports queer and/or women-identified Pilipinx survivance? This is a call to take up space and stand amongst other literary futurist movements such as AfroFuturism and Indigenous Futurisms. As writers and scholars, we choose to unapologetically search for as well as reclaim a language of reimagination and resistance that enlivens the range of Pinay/Pilipinx and queer Pinay/Pilipinx futuristic visions.

We see Pinay/Pilipinx futurisms as amalgamation that chooses nonconformity (whether it be form, gender, sexuality, citizenship or cultural heritage etc.). Our poetics are archipelagic and diasporic, thus able to maneuver within the hybrid topography of the body, the landscape, the oceans and space itself. Thus, this presentation/reading aspires to create a multimedia assemblage from what has been ravished, stolen, or silenced. Through this subversive process, we continue to fuel a tradition of poetics of disruption and renewal.

Notes:
*pinay – a woman of Filipino origin or descent; Filipina
*Pilipinx/Filipinx – gender nonconforming term for someone of Filipino or Filipina origin or descent

Speakers
avatar for Hari Alluri

Hari Alluri

Poet, Editor
Hari Alluri is the author of Flayed City (Kaya Press, 2017), The Promise of Rust (Mouthfeel, 2016) and Carving Ashes (CiCAC, 2013). An award-winning poet, educator, and teaching artist, his work appears widely in anthologies, journals and online venues, including Chautauqua, Poemeleon... Read More →
avatar for Rachelle Cruz

Rachelle Cruz

UC Riverside; Orange Coast College
Rachelle Cruz is from Hayward, California. She is the author of God's Will for Monsters, which won the 2016 Hillary Gravendyk Regional Poetry Prize (Inlandia, 2017), Self-Portrait as Rumor and Blood and co-editor with Melissa Sipin of Kuwento: Lost Things, an anthology of Philippine... Read More →
avatar for Janice Lobo Sapigao

Janice Lobo Sapigao

Janice Lobo Sapigao is a daughter of immigrants from the Philippines. She was named one of the San Francisco Bay Area’s Women to Watch by KQED Arts. She is the author of two books of poetry: Like a Solid to a Shadow (Timeless, Infinite Light, 2017) and microchips for millions (Philippine... Read More →
avatar for Angela Penaredondo

Angela Penaredondo

Assistant Professor, Creative Writing & Digital Humanities, California State University San Bernardino
Angela Peñaredondo is a queer Pilipinx interdisciplinary writer, artist and educator. Angela is author of the chapbook Maroon (Jamii Publications) and All Things Lose Thousands of Times (Inlandia Institute, winner of the Hillary Gravendyk Poetry Prize). Peñaredondo’s work has... Read More →
MV

MT Vallarta

MT Vallarta (they/them/their[s]) is a queer and non-binary Ph.D. candidate in Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Riverside, where they study queer and feminist theory, digital humanist inquiry, and Filipinx poetics. Their work is published and forthcoming in Rabbit Catastrophe... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
DISC-252 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Paris: Climate Crisis Chopped & Screwed
**In case of rain, this durational writing performance will take place in UW1-050**

Jennifer Calkins is a writer, an evolutionary biologist, and an attorney. Anne de Marcken is an interdisciplinary artist, a writer, and founder of The 3rd Thing Press. They each work across disciplines, occupying the haunted institutional and intimate spaces at the intersection of environmental and social justice.

This durational performance takes up our climate crisis and its attendant pretraumatic (thank you Julie Carr) and posttraumatic stress disorders. It is conceived as a disruption of fixed ideas about the role of art and artists, science and scientists, the law and lawyers, grief and grievers, spectacle and spectators, the end of the world and what it feels like to be alive to see it.

During the space of one day of the &Now Convergence, Calkins and de Marcken will conduct a process-based rewrite of the text of “Paris When it Sizzles,” Calkins’s 2018 article about the Paris Climate Agreement published in the UW’s Washington International Law Journal. In an attempt to imagine a redemptive potential in lyricism and in work itself, Calkins and de Marcken will use conceptual and material constraints to discombobulate the syntax and sense-making conventions of legal/political/social discourse. Constraints will derive from the processes and forms of climatology, grammar, poetics and grief.

The installation will invite and incorporate the participation of conference-goers as artifacts, glitches, ghosts in the finished work. Ultimately Calkins and de Marcken will produce a hybrid text artifact of their performance.

Please note: Calkins and de Marcken will reflect on their process and invite discussion about interdisciplinary responses to social and environmental crises in a roundtable from 3:00pm-4:15pm.

Speakers
JC

Jennifer Calkins

Jennifer Calkins is a writer, attorney and evolutionary biologist. Her academic credentials include a Ph.D. in biological science, an M.F.A. in creative writing and a J.D. in law. Between 2010 and 2015 she produced The Quail Diaries, an interdisciplinary project melding science and... Read More →
avatar for Anne de Marcken

Anne de Marcken

Anne de Marcken is an interdisciplinary artist and writer. Her credits include durational writing projects, hybrid narratives, short and feature-length films and videos, and multi-disciplinary installations. She approaches creative work as a process of critical inquiry and radical... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 9:00am - 2:30pm
Codex 18325 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:15am

Break
We encourage you to continue conversations begun during your panel while also clearing the space so that the next group of presenters may come in and begin setting up for their presentations.

You may wish to check out some of the exhibitions or to visit the book fair.

Saturday September 21, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am

10:45am

Beyond Return: Translation, Diaspora, and the Poetics and Politics of Origin
Does convergence always entail what the Antena Collective refers to as "the discomfortable?" Is translation always a conveyance that reworks its source, leaving part of it as something that cannot be said, a detritus in the margins of a worldly order marching inextricably forward?  These four writers and critics take on these questions in relationship to their own and other writings as they address their own national and ethnic origins. Zhang Er considers her Chinese heritage as a writer who writes in Chinese and then works with translators to publish this work in English.  Of interest to her is how specific Chinese contexts become opaque once translated into English and how in rendering these into English new poetic possibilities emerge, sometimes valuable in themselves, if erasing other realities. Susan Gevirtz examines her Eastern European Jewish background focusing on how the narratives and poetry of Jewish identities are often intermixed with multiple and intersectional national and ethnic accounts while at times suppressed from these accounts. She asks more basically, what should one make of the strange desire to do family archeology? How is this "history" necessarily discomfortable and unsettling?  What diverse sources must be turned to—memories, dreams, fieldwork, family lore—to invent and escape the limitations of past accounts? In writing on Greece today, Eleni Stecopoulos explores the ways diaspora and ecology inform each other in the poetics of place, where people are not figures in a timeless landscape but contemporary actors and artists responding to austerity, migration and displacement, loss of biodiversity. How is the idea of the oikos unsettled by contemporary social practice, including poetry and site-specific performance, to make new forms of kinship, economies, and interspecies song?  How to write diaspora not as a myth of return but an ecology of present conditions and multiple identities? Quenton Baker works in what Saidiya Hartman calls the “enormity of the breach” created by chattel slavery. His work asks what it means to survive within the uninhabitable, to have a full inner life while being overdetermined as object? How to call absence into being through speech, how to translate a dominant, violent English into an English that can properly attend to Black interiority, free from the semiotics of a society/world that requires Black death and trauma to arrange itself. He is after a language that unmakes the world through interior spaces,  that might be possible through poetics.

Speakers
avatar for Quenton Baker

Quenton Baker

Quenton Baker is a poet, educator, and Cave Canem fellow. His current focus is anti-blackness and the afterlife of slavery. His work has appeared in Jubilat, Vinyl, Apogee, Poetry Northwest, Pinwheel, and Cura and in the anthologies Measure for Measure: An Anthology of Poetic... Read More →
SG

Susan Gevirtz

Gevirtz’s poetry publications include Hotel abc (Nightboat, 2017) Aerodrome Orion & Starry Messenger (Kelsey Street, 2010); Broadcast (Trafficker, 2009); Thrall (Post-Apollo, 2007); and Hourglass Transcripts (Burning Deck, 2001);  critical writing includes Coming Events (Nightboat... Read More →
avatar for Zhang Er

Zhang Er

Zhang Er, poet and opera librettist, was born in Beijing and moved to US in 1986. She is the author of six collections of poetry in Chinese, most recently Closest to You (2017). Her most recent book in English translation, First Mountain (2018), a collaborative work with American... Read More →
ES

Eleni Stecopoulos

Eleni Stecopoulos is the author of Visceral Poetics (2016), Daphnephoria (2012), and Armies of Compassion (2010). Recent work appears in Best American Experimental Writing 2018, Kitchen Table Translation (ed. Madhu Kaza), and Resist Much, Obey Little: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW1-040 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Expanding the Inquiry: RAD! Residencies @&Now
For our presentation, we bring RAD! Residencies, a critical-creative literary event most often hosted in Los Angeles, to &NOW. In the spirit of alternative artistic and knowledge making practices, we bring together three points of convergence: poetics, curation, and literary community building. These points - in motion, as sparks carrying forth, gathering, dynamic in their transforming energy, porous to interruption, asides and unpredictable happenings - offer ways to embody collaborative making as an ethos toward imagining a different world and how we might act together in it.

We will highlight and amplify the interconnections between writers that organically arose through the writers’ residencies and their chosen themes. They chose themes that they wanted to think about publicly with attendees, interlocutors who also actively responded and wrote and shared at these events. Residents’ return to their themes and ask us to consider poetry’s responsibility to address the past harms lived into our present time, ecological crisis and living with symbiotic nonhuman others, histories of colonialism conjured along the Los Angeles River, and poetics as a way to create collective cognitive changes that may help us to respond meaningfully and urgently to our shared social-political emergency.

Our panel will begin with a curatorial statement, followed by readings, conversation, and a full-room collaborative activity that we hope will expand our intentional literary community building into even more activated, energized, inviting &NOW points.

Speakers
avatar for Harold Abramowitz

Harold Abramowitz

Charles R. Drew University
Harold Abramowitz’s books include Blind Spot, Not Blessed, Dear Dearly Departed, and Man’s Wars And Wickedness: A Book of Proposed Remedies & Extreme Formulations for Curing Hostility, Rivalry, & Ill-Will (with Amanda Ackerman). Harold co-edits the short-form literary press eohippus... Read More →
WA

Will Alexander

Poet, Individual
Will Alexander is a poet, novelist, essayist, aphorist, playwright, visual artist, and pianist. He is author of over 30 books and chapbooks, and is both a Whiting Fellow and a California Arts Council Fellow. In addition, he has been recipient of a PEN Oakland Award, and an American... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Detorie

Michelle Detorie

Michelle Detorie is the author of numerous chapbooks including Fur Birds (Insert Press), How Hate Got Hand (eohippus labs), and Bellum Letters (Dusie). She also makes visual poems, poetry objects, time-based poetry, and curates the public art project, The Poetry Booth. Her first full-length... Read More →
avatar for Joseph Mosconi

Joseph Mosconi

Joseph Mosconi is a writer and taxonomist based in Los Angeles. He co-directs the Poetic Research Bureau and is the author of Fright Catalog (Insert Blanc Press, 2013), Demon Miso/Fashion in Child (Make Now Books, 2014), Renaissance Realism (Gauss PDF, 2016), and, with Pauline Beaudemont... Read More →
GO

Gillian Osborne

Gillian Osborne is a writer and educator based in California. She’s the author of a forthcoming book of non-fiction, Green Green Green (Nightboat Books, 2020), and the co-editor of a collection of critical essays on ecopoetics. She teaches and designs courses on American poetry... Read More →
AQ

Andrea Quaid

Andrea Quaid is a writer and educator. Her work focuses on poetry and poetics, pedagogy, and feminist studies. She is co-editor of Acts + Encounters, a collection of works about experimental writing and community. She is also co-series founder and editor of Palgrave Studies in Contemporary... Read More →
avatar for Laura Vena

Laura Vena

Managing Editor, Founder, Two If By Sea Journal & Press
Laura Vena is a writer, editor, translator, and animal activist whose work has appeared in Bombay Gin, Super Arrow, Tarpaulin Sky, In Posse Review, The Dirty Fabulous, Antennae and elsewhere. She is a Pushcart Prize nominee and winner of the 1913 Press First Book Prize by John Keene... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW1-030 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Form and (Dis)Content, Volume II: Speculative and Experimental Approaches to Language by Authors of Color
The aim of this panel is to discuss the many ways writers of color approach common literary traditions, genres, and tropes, as well as the idea of a standard(izing) notion of language itself. We plan to highlight the various strategies and rationales authors of color use to break from “standard English,” and also debate if there should be—or even needs to be—better recognition and a reclassification of literary forms that use multilingual and/or varied syntax and grammar. Robert Duncan once said, “I don’t seek a synthesis, but a melee.” And yet, this panel will be both synthesis and melee, an example of both convergence and divergence, as its participants will discuss their experiences blending literary, genre fiction, and poetry with creative or critical prose as a means by which to speak to, about, and from certain personal/political identities and viewpoints.

Speakers
KF

Krista Franklin

Krista Franklin is an interdisciplinary artist whose work appears in POETRY magazine, Black Camera, Copper Nickel, Callaloo, Vinyl, BOMB magazine, and the anthologies Encyclopedia, Vol. F-K and L-Z, The Long Term: Resisting Life Sentences Working Toward Freedom, The End of Chiraq... Read More →
avatar for Douglas Kearney

Douglas Kearney

Douglas Kearney has published six books, including Buck Studies (Fence Books, 2016), winner of the Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Award, the CLMP Firecracker Award for Poetry, and California Book Award silver medalist (Poetry). M. NourbeSe Philip calls Kearney’s collection of... Read More →
avatar for Kenning JP Garcia

Kenning JP Garcia

Kenning JP García is an antipoet and diarist. Kenning has a BA in linguistics from SUNY Albany where xe studied several dead languages. Xe is the author of the notvel OF (What Place Meant) along with several speculative epics. In addition, xe is an editor at Rigorous, Five 2 One... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Maritza McCauley

Jennifer Maritza McCauley

University of Missouri
Jennifer Maritza McCauley is a teacher, writer, and editor of African-American and Puerto Rican descent. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Kimbilio, CantoMundo and the Knight Foundation, and awards from Best of the Net, Independent Publisher Book... Read More →
RS

Rone Shavers

Rone Shavers is a writer who publishes in multiple genres. His fiction has appeared in ACM: Another Chicago Magazine, Identitytheory.com, Longform.org, Nth Word, PANK, The Operating System, and Thought Catalog, among other places. Shavers’ non-fiction essays and essay-length reviews... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
DISC-061 Auditorium 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Radical Place : The Poetics of Experimental Geography
This panel seeks to explore the effects of what cultural geographer Denis Cosgrove described as “the patterns and interactions of human culture, both material and non-material, in relation to the natural environment and the human organization of space” on new poetics. Inspired by the critical tradition of Raymond Williams, whose work explored the concepts of 'structure of feeling' and 'knowable community' as tethered to and determined in part by landscape, these poems deal with the embodied practices and dynamic processes emergent from a variety of locations, engaging with emotion, lyricism, politics, memory, and both exterior and interior identity production.

The panelists will each briefly present poems which function as personal markers of place in the context of both personal and political history, followed by discussion and Q&A. Eudora Welty writes that “Place, to the writer at work, is seen in a frame. Not an empty frame, a brimming one. Point of view is a sort of burning-glass, a product of personal experience and time; it is burnished with feelings and sensibilities, charged from moment to moment with the sun-points of imagination.” In keeping, the panel’s poetics themselves are representative of a variety of approaches to dealing with the influence of divergent geographies, from the physical to phenomenological and post-industrial to post-colonial. By presenting and discussing work that spans the poetic spectrum we seek to highlight and discuss points of convergence within the panel.

Speakers
avatar for Jalayna Carter

Jalayna Carter

A storyteller from St. Louis, MO, Jalayna Carter studied literature and journalism in the Midwest before moving to Seattle and pursuing nonprofit communications. The 2018 Jack Straw Writers Fellow and 2019 Artist Trust GAP recipient is fascinated by experimental poetic trends and... Read More →
DD

Demian DinéYazhi'

Demian DinéYazhi' (Diné) is a transdisciplinary artist who uses social interventions to interrupt colonial power structures. His blog Heterogeneoushomosexual contemplates “Radical Indigenous Queer Feminist Art” and how a marginalized body navigates and resists assimilation... Read More →
avatar for Sam Roxas-Chua

Sam Roxas-Chua

Artist, The Requatorist
Sam Roxas-Chua is the author of Saying Your Name Three Times Underwater, Echolalia in Script, and Fawn Language. His poems, artworks, and asemic writings have appeared in journals including Narrative, December Magazine, Cream City Review and an essay/review of his two recent books... Read More →
avatar for Adam Tedesco

Adam Tedesco

Editor, REALITY BEACH
Born in Upstate New York, poet and video artist Adam Tedesco is a founding editor of REALITY BEACH, an independent chapbook press, journal of new poetics, and roving reading series. His video poems and site-specific work have been shown at MoMA PS1 and No Nation Gallery, among other... Read More →
avatar for Amie Zimmerman

Amie Zimmerman

Editor, YesYes Books
Amie Zimmerman lives in Portland, Oregon. Her work has been published in Sixth Finch, DIAGRAM, West Branch, Puerto del Sol, and Heavy Feather Review, among others. She has two chapbooks, Oyster (REALITY BEACH), and Compliance (Essay Press), curates the reading series 'family portrait... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW1-010 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Text in Textiles: a critical/creative hybrid panel session
Lisa Anne Auerbach, Francesca Capone & Jena Osman, "Text in Textiles"

A series of presentations and an inter-arts discussion that explores the articulations of textiles (what Jill Magi has named “a textile poetics”). The focus is on how woven forms code/change/translate language and what the stakes are when language is made material in textile form. The L.A. Times has described Lisa Anne Auerbach’s recent tapestries as “concrete poems that encourage visitors to leap from one title to another, improvising story lines that spread out in every direction”; she will discuss how a woven bookshelf can function as portraiture as well as her political textiles. Francesca Capone will present her procedural  “translations” of weavings into language; she has created a lexicon of equivalencies between the grammar of weaving and English grammar. Jena Osman will present a visual essay-poem experiment (a collaboration with artist Amze Emmons) that applies digital translation algorithms to everyday textile objects; the project aims to make visible of history of connections between ancient weaving technology and everyday digital tools. Topics touched on during the session may include steganography and coded clothing, quipus and linguistic knots, jacquard loom punch cards and digital coding...

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J'Lyn Chapman, "A Long Line and a Necessary Waist"

The experience of wearing clothing produces what artist and material culture researcher Ellen Sampson calls “inarticulable and embodied knowledge.” The convergence of bodies and garments produce friction, so that friction itself becomes the production of meaning imprinted on the garment, skin, and memory. This knowledge is ineffable in part because the friction of object-body-mind is itself so much a part of the habits of daily experience, what Maurice Merleau-Ponty calls the “bodily schema,” that to isolate the constituent parts of the convergence is to make no-sense. And yet, the drive toward signification persists—how might one translate the phenomenology of clothing into language? How might one move beyond the language of history or cultural studies to express the intimate reciprocity of the body, the garment, and thought?

I propose a method that first traces the various acts of “translation” involved in the work of Etel Adnan, whose visual art and poetry suggests a convergence of the internal and external, a materiality of thought. These translations might be more appropriately considered transits, bridging Adnan’s poetry, her paintings, and her tapestries. Further, in early 2016, the fashion designer Tory Burch created a small “pre-fall” collection that, in Burch’s words, “found inspiration in [Adnan’s] beautiful sense of color and contrast as well as her travels and multicultural spirit.” I wish to examine how the process of translating between mediums might offer a language through which to perform, not simply name, the material conditions of the body.

Secondly, through practice-based research in which I translate text to visual art to textile to a worn garment, I seek to find how my own body performs another act of translation by modifying the garment through wear and how, in turn, the garment imprints itself on my body, how it creates unique sensations and grammatical arrangements.

Speakers
avatar for Jena Osman

Jena Osman

Jena Osman’s books of poems include Motion Studies, Corporate Relations, Public Figures, The Network, An Essay in Asterisks and The Character. Osman was a 2006 Pew Fellow in the Arts, and has received grants for her poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation... Read More →
LA

Lisa Anne Auerbach

Lisa Anne Auerbach is an interdisciplinary artist that explores novel vehicles for controversial agendas and language’s ability to alter the present. She is most well-known for her machine-made knit clothing and banners that host tongue-in-cheek political catchphrases, quotation... Read More →
FC

Francesca Capone

Francesca Capone is a visual artist, writer, and textile designer. Her books Text means Tissue (2017), and Writing in Threads (2015) focus on textile poetics. She has exhibited at Whitechapel Gallery in London, LUMA/Westbau in Switzerland, Textile Arts Center in NYC, and 99¢ Plus... Read More →
JC

J’Lyn Chapman

J’Lyn Chapman lives in Longmont, Colorado, and serves as an Assistant Professor in the Jack Kerouac School at Naropa University. Her book Beastlife was published by Calamari Archive in 2016. The same year, the long essay A Thing of Shreds and Patches was selected by Amaranth Borsuk... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
DISC-252 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Writing Girlhood
Girls' struggles are the struggles of our time, which still asks girls to be nice and not matter, which still requires girls to be sexual objects, to accommodate and serve others. Writers taking on girlhood risk sentimentality and over-determination, yet girl-affect generates boundaries that shape the collectivity without being essential. This panel asks, what are the possible narrative and affect positions of girlhood? How might these experiences be expressed creatively and transgressively in language? Are girls always subject to the process Judith Butler calls “girling,” an obligatory part of subjectivity: "Femininity is thus not the product of a choice, but the forcible citation of a norm whose complex historicity is indissociable from relations of discipline, regulation, punishment."  Writers on this panel will present a fem-noir fiction addressing, deflecting, and reconciling pressures on the “girled” body; nonfiction exploring girlhood as misperception, how are queer, brown bodies become infantilized based on white heteronormative expectations; a crowd-sourced epistle to a daughter about sexual violence; an essay about whiteness and shoplifting; and an ecofeminist video essay considering the relationship between girlhood and passivity/silence/submission through juxtaposing public domain footage of the natural world with clips from mid-20th century U.S. menstruation education. Through a multi-generic and interdisciplinary approach, we will showcase the effects and possibilities of the constructs of girlhood, especially those that disrupt, complicate, or subvert heteronormative, white, middle class values and experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Hume

Christine Hume

Professor of English, Eastern Michigan University
Christine Hume is the author of a lyric memoir in the form of three interlinked essays, Saturation Project (Solid Objects, 2019), as well as three books of poetry. Her chapbooks include Lullaby: Speculations on the First Active Sense (Ugly Duckling Presse); Ventifacts (Omnidawn... Read More →
avatar for Aisha Sabatini Sloan

Aisha Sabatini Sloan

Aisha Sabatini Sloan is the author of The Fluency of Light and Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit. She is the Helen Zell Visiting Professor of Creative Nonfiction at the University of Michigan's MFA program.
avatar for Christina Milletti

Christina Milletti

Christina Milletti’s novel Choke Box: a Fem-Noir won the Juniper Prize for Fiction and was published by University of Massachusetts Press in March 2019. Her first book, The Religious & Other Fiction (a collection of stories) was published by Carnegie Mellon University Press, and... Read More →
SM

Susan McCarty

Susan McCarty is an assistant professor of English at Oakland University in Michigan. She is the author of Anatomies (Aforementioned Productions, 2015). Her stories and essays have appeared in Zone 3, The Iowa Review, the Utne Reader, and other journals.


Saturday September 21, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
DISC-162 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011
  • about Aisha Sabatini Sloan is the author of The Fluency of Light and Dreaming of Ramadi in Detroit. She is the Helen Zell Visiting Professor of Creative Nonfiction at the University of Michigan's MFA program.

10:45am

Sounding Failure: Against Convergence as a Utopian Ideal
How do we use sound and performance -- both as creative forms and experimental sites -- in order to produce or rewrite the myths that have been constructed around gender and empire? In what ways do we “fail” -- to emerge, to communicate, to perform -- and why might failure be useful as a practice of (non)convergence? If we think of failure as modulated for particular bodies, and convergence as an imperial myth or a utopian ideal, then how might we forge new intimacies across our own embodied practices? In what ways can the performance of new sites of failure constitute bodily, structural, or sonic (non)convergence as an encounter with empire?

As a group of interdisciplinary writers and artists, we propose a creative presentation followed by a collaborative conversation around the poetics and politics of failure within the specific context of our sound and performance practices.

By using mannequins, costumes, and voice modulation, Sara Deniz Akant explores the damning myths of nation, gender, and language as a site for both failure and creative production, asking how the multiplying body can be used to escape its neoliberal constructions and disrupt its own intersecting lines of power. Ashna Ali explores transgenerational relationships between women and dynamics of postcolonial internalizations/ conflicts of imperial pressure on the brown femme body through experimental performance poetry. Daisy Atterbury considers U.S. settler colonial dynamics, soundscapes and the built environment, engaging audiences through film, installation and performance as well as print media as she considers how we (dis)locate ourselves.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Deniz Akant

Sara Deniz Akant

Sara Deniz Akant is a Turkish-American educator, poet and performer. She is the author of Babette, selected by Maggie Nelson for Rescue Press, as well as the chapbooks Parades and Latronic Strag. She researches 20th century poetics at the CUNY Grad Center, teaches writing at Hunter... Read More →
AA

Ashna Ali

Ashna Ali is a writer, researcher, and educator. Their poetry has appeared in several journals including HeART Online, Bone Bouquet, femmescapes, and Nat. Brut. They research postcolonial diasporic feminisms and is a professor of English at Bard High School Early College Manhatta... Read More →
DA

Daisy Atterbury

Daisy Atterbury is a writer based in New York and New Mexico. She is co-director of NM Poetics, founded in 2010. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in BOMB, Jacket2 and Post45. She teaches creative nonfiction classes at Queens College. She’s currently working on a collection... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW2-021 Dance Studio 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Threads of Influence & Homage: Embodied Poetics
In this workshop poets invite, trace and inscribe threads of enlivening influence. Which artists provide roots, architectures and constellations? What are our animating elemental permissions and how might we write through the ongoing conversations we have with our most resonant sources? How is literary inheritance: garment, house, vehicle, or breath? How do sound, presence, ritual and ethos translate into poetic practices, structures and aspirations of the present moment? Participants will explore how our work is already in correspondence with our most potentially transformative sources, and we might heighten and illuminate these ongoing relationships in our writing.

Sign up by adding to your SCHED.

Speakers
avatar for Laynie Browne

Laynie Browne

Laynie Browne’s recent books include: In Garments Worn by Lindens, Periodic Companions, and The Book of Moments. Her honors include a Pew Fellowship, the National Poetry Series Award, and the Contemporary Poetry Series. She teaches at University of Pennsylvania and at Swarthmore... Read More →
PB

Peter Buller

Peter Buller writes poetry and criticism, as well as a photographer and letterpress printer. Their work focuses on spatial poetics and myth, and questions of silence, intimacy, and transformation. Work is forthcawing amongst a crowing number of established literary circles.


Saturday September 21, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW1-060 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

12:00pm

Lunch Break
Pre-purchased boxed lunches will be available at North Creek Event Center.
You must present your conference badge to receive your meal.
Boxed lunches may be pre-purchased through the registration website any time before 9/12/2019.
For additional dining locations, please see this page.

Saturday September 21, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
North Creek Events Center 18325 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

12:00pm

Bookfair—Open Books: A Poem Emporium
This year’s official bookseller is Open Books, A Poem Emporium, which will be on-site throughout the conference. In addition to offering our keynotes’ recent volumes, Open Books will be happy to buy books direct from participants and offer 60% in cash or 80% in store credit for any books sold. Titles may be dropped off in person at the book fair table or shipped ahead.

To ship titles by mail, packages must be received by Tuesday Sept. 17, 2019. Ship to:
Open Books Attn: For &Now
2414 North 45th Street
Seattle, WA 98103

Titles can be returned by mail within three months of the &Now conference if author emails openpoetrybooks at gmail.com requesting titles to be returned by mail and pays shipping costs. Otherwise, any remaining copies will be considered a gift in kind.




Saturday September 21, 2019 12:00pm - 4:00pm
North Creek Events Center 18325 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Sound / Site / Archive
What can the past teach us about place through artful digital archiving? Five panelists discuss ways in which they have creatively documented histories.

“Sites and Toposes” is a performance work created by Kelly Dulaney and Ian Bawn. This piece seeks to speak to the politics of the forgotten and welds sonic, visual, and literary elements within a topographical space. Dulaney and Bawn will present recordings, gifs, and still images as documentation of their performance in order to appropriate and disperse the “echo” by repositioning and disorienting points of location in a shifting topographical space. They will address ways in which technological convergences and divergent practices make such a performance possible and discuss the role of the document in performance practices.

Abraham Avnisan’s “On Specters of Home” is an intergenre talk that grapples with the relationship between art and politics. Bringing together original and archival materials, the work reflects Avnisan’s trip to Israel-Palestine, the place of his birth, after a ten-year absence. As an interactive installation, “Specters of Home” would bring together architecture, virtual and augmented reality, and contemporary dance to explore colonialism, exile and haunting by asking how the physical absence and political exclusion of Palestinians from the State of Israel haunts contemporary Israeli society and Jewish-American culture. Avnisan will explore questions of accountability and responsibility within colonial and post-colonial contexts.

"The Dead Ends of Dead Men: Fabulated Archive as Genre" by Carlito Espudo situates itself at the intersection of creative and critical theory by actualizing Saidiya Hartman's concept of "critical fabulation." Espudo will discuss the practical usage of this new genre and how he has fabulated his own digital archive for his late grandfather, Charles Beal, a popular jazz musician. The process, obstacles, and benefits of his project, "The Straw Hat Jazz Archive" will be discussed along with contextualizing this practice of creatively engaging the archive by reviewing Voyage of the Sable Venus by Robin Coste Lewis.

Jeff T. Johnson’s “Janky Materiality” develops a matrix of potential connection and disconnection points between writerly and pedagogical communities. With the purpose of bridging gaps between experimental poetry and digital language art communities, and between cultural criticism, poetics, performance, and music writing, Johnson will discuss the development of this project and examine concerns regarding analog-digital interface and materiality, embodiment, language-oriented experimental poetry and digital language art, experimental electronic music and modular synths, the literary technology of the album format.

Speakers
avatar for Abraham Avnisan

Abraham Avnisan

Assistant Professor, Kent State University
Abraham Avnisan is an experimental writer and new media artist whose work is situated at the intersection of image, text, and code. He creates mobile apps, new media installations and mixed reality performances that seek to subvert dominant narratives through embodied encounters with... Read More →
avatar for Ian Bawn

Ian Bawn

3d Animator, Health Scholars
Ian Bawn was raised astride the highest mountains of the Continental Divide. His experimental animation combines material and digital media and has screened at Red Rocks Amphitheater, Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design, and The Sie Film Center. Ian works as a 3d animator & motion... Read More →
avatar for Kelly Dulaney

Kelly Dulaney

Kelly Dulaney began in the cinders of Arizona; now she lives alongside the hogback hills of Colorado. Her writing appears in Western Humanities Review, Cherry Tree, Black Warrior Review, Fugue, Waxwing, Fairy Tale Review, The Best American Experimental Writing Anthology (BAX) 2015... Read More →
avatar for Carlito Espudo

Carlito Espudo

San Diego Fellow in Literature, UC San Diego
Carlito Espudo is a queer, genderfunky Chicanx writer, born and raised in Palm Springs, California. He works in hybrid forms with a focus in fragmentation, and focuses on the themes of family, gender, and memory through a multicultural lens. You can find him earning his MFA at UC... Read More →
avatar for Jeff T. Johnson

Jeff T. Johnson

Jeff T. Johnson is the author of Trouble Songs: A Musicological Poetics (punctum books, 2018). His writing has appeared in Sink Review, PEN America, Jacket2, Tarpaulin Sky, and elsewhere. He writes the music and culture series Book Album Book at Fanzine, and is at work on a performative... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
UW1-010 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Abstraction, Engagement, and Time: the Politics of Form
In what ways can creative works inform and dictate politics? Three panelists discuss how art can influence social and political change.

Deborah Meadows will read from her book Lecture Notes: a duration poem in twelve parts, which was derived from notes taken during lectures of the ongoing Cal Tech series from March 14, 2007 to November 9, 2007 in Pasadena, California. She explores how time may be more, or different, than “seat time” or “time served” on one’s body, in one’s thought, one’s desire. Relying heavily on readers for critique and engaged reading of the ways that capital markets or human behavior are examined in projects, the background assumptions of virtue, worth, intention, the state of being informed, and how advanced scientific and other research may outstrip our current sets of vocabularies and representations and show those sets for the exhausted garments they are. Interleaved between each set of notes are excerpts from poets, artists, and thinkers such as Eva Hesse, Robert Smithson, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Alain Badiou, Melvin B. Tolson.

Choreographer Merce Cunningham and Composer John Cage worked through an era of intense social and political change without addressing those changes directly in their work. Nevertheless, those works were profoundly of the time. The dance/music pieces Cunningham and Cage produced created an open field that the audience entered in order to complete the work, becoming the third point in a triangle. In this hybrid critical-creative presentation, “Rehearsing in Silence,” Maya Sonenberg will explore ways in which an artistic practice itself can be intensely political, challenging viewers’ assumptions while making space for a convergence of views.

Cole Swensen’s project "Landscape Alive" is based on a convergence of poetry and art criticism and explores the work of landscape artists who have taken an inherently phenomenological approach, emphasizing participation and inclusion in the landscape rather than the separation upon which traditional landscape art relies. Swensen will present poems/essays on Robert Smithson's Mirror Displacements in the Yucatan and Christo and Jeanne-Claude's The Running Fence. She will discuss how each of these works redefined the terms of landscape art by emphasizing participation in their given environments and how they present landscape art as engagement rather than as detached observation, encourage an increased sense of belonging to, and thus responsibility for, the earth, honoring it as our sole condition of possibility.






Speakers
avatar for Deborah Meadows

Deborah Meadows

Deborah Meadows is an Emerita faculty member with California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. She lives with her husband in Los Angeles’ Arts District/Little Tokyo. Her recent books are: Lecture Notes: A duration poem in twelve parts (BlazeVOX books, 2018), The Demotion of... Read More →
avatar for Maya Sonenberg

Maya Sonenberg

professor, University of Washington
Maya Sonenberg is the author of two story collections and numerous essays. Her most recent hybrid work is the chapbook After the Death of Shostakovich Père. She teaches creative writing at the University of Washington--Seattle, where she has served as Director of Creative Writing... Read More →
CS

Cole Swensen

Cole Swensen is the author of 17 volumes of poetry, most recently Landscapes on a Train (Nightboat, 2015) and On Walking On (Nightboat, 2017). Most of her books are based on research projects, often exploring issues of land-from gardens and parks, involving questions of public vs... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
DISC-252 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

ALL THIS & MORE: Form, Subjectivity, and Difference in Hybrid, Multidisciplinary Works
Traditional critical approaches to reading and interpreting the work of nonwhite, marginalized writers and artists tend to focus on markers of social, cultural, and racial identity as a means to dismiss or undermine formal innovation. The so-called “literary vs. cultural” ideology historically embraced by the academy places the formally-experimental in opposition to politically-engaged work, deeming the former “avant-garde” or “purely literary” and dismissing the latter as “identity politics” or “politically correct.” Additionally, work by marginalized writers is often expected to conform to predictable, acceptable themes (e.g., assimilation, redemption) that do not challenge or disrupt existing structures of power. But as Dorothy J. Wang argues, reading minority writers with close attention to both formal concerns and the larger contexts that have shaped the work, can suggest new possibilities for meaning-making.

In this panel, we will present and discuss hybrid, multimedia, and interdisciplinary work in which the use of form is inseparable from the social, historical, and political contexts that produced the writer’s subjectivity. With the goal of challenging ingrained literary-critical categories and assumptions, we will consider and claim alternate literary lineages and critical frameworks that can more expansively accommodate the intricacies of our complicated social, cultural, and political realities.

Speakers
avatar for Mary-Kim Arnold

Mary-Kim Arnold

Visiting Lecturer, Brown University
Mary-Kim Arnold’s Litany for the Long Moment (Essay Press, 2018), an experimental memoir about her adoption from Korea at the age of two, has been honored by the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association, featured in NPR’s Code Switch 2018 Book Guide, and named by Entropy... Read More →
avatar for Diana Khoi Nguyen

Diana Khoi Nguyen

Writer in Residence, University of Tennessee at Knoxville
A poet and multimedia artist, Diana Khoi Nguyen’s debut collection, Ghost Of (Omnidawn, 2018), was selected by Terrance Hayes for the Omnidawn Open Contest. In addition to winning the 92Y "Discovery" / Boston Review Poetry Contest, 2019 Kate Tufts Discovery Award and Colorado Book... Read More →
avatar for Jan Maghinay Padios

Jan Maghinay Padios

Jan Maghinay Padios is a scholar and writer whose work has been published by Indiana Review, The Center for Art & Thought, Zócalo Public Square, Cultural Studies, and the Kunsthall Trondheim. She is an associate professor and the Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of... Read More →
avatar for Dao Strom

Dao Strom

Dao Strom is a writer, artist, and musician whose work uses disparate “voices”—written, sung, visual—to contemplate the intersection of personal and collective histories. She is the author of a bilingual poetry/art book, You Will Always Be Someone From Somewhere Else (Ajar... Read More →
LT

lê thi diem thúy

lê thi diem thúy is the author of the novel The Gangster We Are All Looking For, and the solo performance works Mua He Do Lua/Red Fiery Summer, the bodies between us, and Carte Postale. She has been awarded fellowships from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the John Simon... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
DISC-162 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Language Tactics
What can words do when martialed against the forces of the contemporary political moment? Three panelists explore language’s ability to shape lived experience.

Joel Felix will develop a poetics of haunted space, discussing the coming together of multiple, contested perspectives within the spatial relations of this contemporary political moment marked by space infused with threat and fraught with real and imagined harm. Drawing on theorists of Black futurity from Wynter to Campt, and poems of Williams, Brand, Bonney, Davies, Wang and others, he presents a poetics that seeks a difficult embrace of a haunted present not shy of what it suffers and framing futures we have never seen before.

Broc Rossel turns our attention to the Ars Poetica, examining debates in lyric theory as poetry’s political theater. As a poem that argues for itself as a preferred method and form (whether conceptual, lyrical, or otherwise), the ars poetica both reifies and subverts poetical discourse by acknowledging the necessity of critical self-reflection, and in so doing makes an implicit case for poetry as both individually produced and socially constructed.

In “Being Pointless,” Mady Schutzman performs and celebrates ambiguity, imprecision, and indirectness as playful means of restructuring hierarchies and reimagining communities. Through a lyrical compendium of tools and tactics culled from jokes and koans, riddles and clown acts, mobius strips, feedback loops, fugues and fractals, and a condition known as Ganser syndrome, Schutzman suggests being pointless as a means of eliciting unanticipated, edgy but potent convergences within contested terrains.

Edwin Torres will present “World-Making As Poetic Interruption,” where the relative aspects of language-making are delivered as convergent points of world-making. He asks: how do we use say to see? Where can cryptic signifiers become visual noise to then interrupt/interpret new vocalities? Can the imagination step aside to allow connection a deeper path? Is there still a place for making new worlds in poetry?

Speakers
JF

Joel Felix

Joel Felix was raised just out of sight of Ford's River Rouge motor works in downriver Detroit. He taught at the School of the Art Institute and other institutions and co-edited the 90's-00's editions of LVNG Magazine in Chicago. His collections include Limbs of the Apple Tree Never... Read More →
avatar for Broc Rossell

Broc Rossell

Assistant Professor, NTU
Broc Rossell is Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He's author of Festival (Cleveland State 2015) and Alameda (Selva Oscura, 2020), and co-editor with W. Scott Howard of Poetics and Praxis 'After' Objectivism (University of Iowa... Read More →
avatar for Mady Schutzman

Mady Schutzman

Mady Schutzman is writer and theater artist.  She has published essays and creative non-fiction in several anthologies and journals including Black Clock, The Drama Review, Errant Bodies, and Theatre Topics.  She is author of The Real Thing: Hysteria, Performance, and Advertising... Read More →
avatar for Edwin Torres

Edwin Torres

Lingualisualist, Brainlingo
Edwin Torres is a NYC native whose books include, “XOETEOX: the infinite word object” (Wave Books), “Ameriscopia” (University of Arizona Press), “In The Function of External Circumstances” (Nightboat), and “The PoPedology of an Ambient Language” (Atelos Books). Anthologies... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
UW1-040 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Performing Translation/Translating Performance
This panel examines the convergence between practices of performance and practices of translation. We propose a broad definition of translation: including rewriting, adaptation, embodiment, and finally performance itself. We propose an equally broad definition of performance, including marginal acts, like the conversations between poets and translators, and liminal, hybrid genres, like Poets Theater. Is translation itself a kind of performance, a choreography of exchange? And is performance inextricable from translation—from the body as it moves through historical, political, and linguistic space? In our presentations we will focus on limit cases, exceptional practices that challenge the boundaries of both translation and performance. Toby Altman will examine Aimé Cesaire’s Une Tempête, a translation and revision of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, looking at the way in which translation offers a resource for reformulating the logistics of colonial time—and thinking more broadly about the way Poets Theater challenges colonial paradigms of authorship and performance. Corina Copp will discuss her recent translation of Chantal Akerman’s only play, Night Lobby (1992), using Akerman’s conception of "elsewhere” to explore how the adaptive, unfounded spaces that translation and performance make possible in this work are crucial for an anticolonial poetic theater. Benjamin Krusling will investigate Amiri Baraka’s eulogy for his sister Kimako alongside Greek tragedies from Sophocles and Aeschylus, thinking about the performance and translation of pain as it moves from the private to the public, splitting genres apart and renewing and (re-)establishing politico-cultural values. Bianca Rae Messinger will look at the work of Marguerite Duras, Tracie Morris, Bernadette Mayer and the late Argentine poet Leonidas Lamborghini, thinking through translation as a performative and a generative object and asking where the act of translation begins and where it ends—if, in fact, it does.

Speakers
avatar for Toby Altman

Toby Altman

Toby Altman is the author of Arcadia, Indiana (Plays Inverse, 2017) and several chapbooks, including Every Hospital by Bertrand Goldberg (Except One), winner of the 2018 Ghost Proposal Chapbook Prize. His poems can or will be found in Gulf Coast, jubilat, Lana Turner, and other journals... Read More →
BK

Benjamin Krusling

Benjamin Krusling is the author of a chapbook, GRAPES (Projective Industries, 2018), and a multimedia project, I have too much to hide, from Triple Canopy (forthcoming 2019). Work can be found or is forthcoming in Black Warrior Review, Denver Quarterly, The Recluse, and elsewhere... Read More →
BR

Bianca Rae Messinger

Bianca Rae Messinger is a poet and translator living in Iowa City, IA. She is the author of the digital chapbook The Love of God (Inpatient Press, 2016) and The Land Was V There (89+/LUMA, 2014). Her translation of Juana Isola’s chapbook You Need a Long Table Behind a Pile of Firewood... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
UW1-030 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Pushing Boundary: Trans, Genderqueer & Non-Binary Poets Off the Page
Four trans, genderqueer and non-binary poets will showcase how they work beyond the printed page. In addition to work that exists at the intersection of the body and text, these poets produce interdisciplinary work which creates embodied, living, and breathing works through the use of image, sound, dance, performance, recording, and video. The results are multi-disciplinary, often refractive, accumulating into fluid, rich, and multi-layered forms.

Working in parallel to gender identity, trans, genderqueer and non-binary poets often push against the boundaries of genre, layering text-based work with other art practices and mediums. A radical trans-poetics does not restrict itself to text as an entrance to meaning. The intersection of body and text, although common to the work of many poets, finds a heightened necessity in the work of these trans, genderqueer and non-binary poets, inducing them to create forms that more closely track the reality of their bodies, identities, and experience.

Speakers
SA

Samuel Ace

Samuel Ace is a trans/genderqueer poet and sound artist. He is the author of several books, most recently Our Weather Our Sea (Black Radish), the re-issued Meet Me There: Normal Sex and Home in three days. Don’t wash., (Belladonna* Germinal Texts), and Stealth with poet Maureen... Read More →
avatar for Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen

Assistant Professor, University of Washington Bothell
Ching-In Chen is author of The Heart's Traffic: a novel in poems (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009), recombinant (Kelsey Street Press, 2017; 2018 Lambda Literary Award Winner for Transgender Poetry); and to make black paper sing (speCt! Books, 2019). Chen is also co-editor of The Revolution... Read More →
avatar for Jai Dulani

Jai Dulani

Jai Dulani is a Desi queer activist, writer and multi-media artist. His writing has appeared in SAMAR, bustingbinaries, Teachers & Writers, Black Girl Dangerous, and the anthology, “Experiments in a Jazz Aesthetic.” Dulani has been a Kundiman Fellow, a VONA/ Voices Fellow, and... Read More →
DE

Duriel E. Harris

Duriel E. Harris is a poet, performer, and sound artist. She is author of three print volumes of poetry, including her most recent awardwinning, No Dictionary of a Living Tongue (Nightboat, 2017), Drag (2003) and Amnesiac: Poems (2010), and her multi-genre one-woman theatrical performance... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
DISC-061 Auditorium 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Where Languages Converge / Collide
This panel imagines the poem as a site where languages collide. Each panelist investigates, experiments, and imagines within multilinguality—where language come from place, home, epistemological disciplines, life realms. We will ask what happens when you imagine the text as a site of convergence for multiple languages and realms of thought. How can these convergences of languages challenge structures and the limits of structural thinking? What sorts of new structures can be built to hold these potentially violent collisions?

Speakers
TM

Tonya M. Foster

Tonya M. Foster is the author of A Swarm of Bees in High Court (Belladonna*, 2015) and the co-editor of Third Mind: Teaching Creative Writing through Visual Art (Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 2002). She is an assistant professor in writing and literature at California College... Read More →
avatar for Stefania Heim

Stefania Heim

Assistant Professor, Western Washington University
Stefania Heim is author of the poetry collections HOUR BOOK (Ahsahta, 2019) and A Table That Goes On for Miles (Switchback, 2014). She is translator of Geometry of Shadows (A Public Space Books 2019), a volume of the Italian poems of metaphysical artist Giorgio de Chirico. In fall... Read More →
avatar for Prageeta Sharma

Prageeta Sharma

Professor
Prageeta Sharma’s fourth book of poems, Grief Sequence, will be published by Wave Books in fall 2019. She is the founder of the conference Thinking Its Presence: Race, Creative Writing, Literary Studies and Art. A recipient of the 2010 Howard Foundation Award, she has taught at... Read More →
MD

Mónica de la Torre

Poet, scholar, and translator Mónica de la Torre's most recent book of poems is Happy End/All Welcome (UDP, 2017). Senior editor at BOMB magazine from 2007-2016, she has translated an array of Latin American poets including the late Gerardo Deniz, and coedited the anthology Reversible... Read More →
SW

Simone White

Simone White is the author of Dear Angel of Death (UDP), Of Being Dispersed (Futurepoem), and House Envy of All the World (Factory School), and the chapbooks Unrest (UDP) and Dolly (with Kim Thomas; Q Avenue). Recipient of a 2017 Whiting Award for poetry, she teaches at the University... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
UW2-005 Auditorium 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

1:15pm

Little Brown Language
Little Brown Language is a dance-incantation that brings women's relational voice to bear on historical texts of Spanish colonization and Catholic conversion, in the Philippines and Venezuela.

In performing these acts of translation, we address the pasts and those passed who live on, interwoven with memories of our mothers, motherlands and mother tongues. A 25-minute version of Little Brown Language showcased in North West New Works Festival, at On the Boards/Behnke Center for Contemporary Performance in Seattle, Washington, June 14-16.

In this new performance research project, I am collaborating with two Seattle-based dance-artists, Milvia Pacheco and Angel Alviar-Langley. We are exploring the meeting point of performance and healing, and do so by drawing on a broad spectrum of healing modalities, movement techniques, vocal work, sound and written composition. I am especially interested in how we can attend to Blackness and Indigeneity as relational configurations that converge questions of land, memory and language.

We will perform an excerpt of Little Brown Language followed by a roundtable discussion on our creative process.

Speakers
AA

Angel Alviar-Langley (Moonyeka)

Angel Alviar-Langley (Moonyeka) is a disabled, queer, Filipinx, femme, street-styles dancer who utilizes art and organizing to realize a more inclusive intersectional world for her communities. Moonyeka is a Seattle Dances DANCE CRUSH, Tina La Padula Fellow, Mary Gates Leadership... Read More →
NM

Naomi Macalalad Bragin

Naomi Macalalad Bragin is a streetdancer, performance artist and assistant professor at UW Bothell. Their writing has won awards from Drama Review, Congress on Research in Dance, and American Society for Theatre Research. Her book project Black Power of Hip-Hop Dance has received... Read More →
avatar for Milvia Pacheco Salvatierra

Milvia Pacheco Salvatierra

Milvia Pacheco Salvatierra is an Afrolatina artist, born in Caracas, Venezuela. She devotes her life to reaching liberation through art and movement, as a contemporary dancer-choreographer, bodyworker, mother and community organizer. As director of MÁS (Movimiento Afrolatino Seattle... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
UW2-021 Dance Studio 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

2:30pm

Break
We encourage you to continue conversations begun during your panel while also clearing the space so that the next group of presenters may come in and begin setting up for their presentations.

You may wish to check out some of the exhibitions or to visit the book fair.

Saturday September 21, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm

3:00pm

Asian/American Speculative Poetics
Asian bodies are often depicted as robotic, mechanical, and reflective of techno-orientalist futuristic anxieties, but Asian American speculative poets, hybrid writers, artists and scholars have continued to rework “machine” tropes in poetry, film, and other genres. Re-writing such persistent tropes in contemporary science fiction film and literature, this hybrid conversation/performance will feature Asian American poets, hybrid writers, artists and scholars discussing various cross-cultural interventions via alternative futurisms, recombinant texts, machine dreams and speculative media projects.

Speakers
avatar for Vidhu Aggarwal

Vidhu Aggarwal

Associate Professor, Rollins College
Vidhu Aggarwal’s poetry and multimedia practices engage with world-building, video, and comic book media, and draw from mythic schemas from contemporary science, popular culture, and ancient texts. Her poetry book The Trouble with Humpadori (2016) imagines a cosmic mythological... Read More →
avatar for Ching-In Chen

Ching-In Chen

Assistant Professor, University of Washington Bothell
Ching-In Chen is author of The Heart's Traffic: a novel in poems (Arktoi/Red Hen Press, 2009), recombinant (Kelsey Street Press, 2017; 2018 Lambda Literary Award Winner for Transgender Poetry); and to make black paper sing (speCt! Books, 2019). Chen is also co-editor of The Revolution... Read More →
avatar for Rachelle Cruz

Rachelle Cruz

UC Riverside; Orange Coast College
Rachelle Cruz is from Hayward, California. She is the author of God's Will for Monsters, which won the 2016 Hillary Gravendyk Regional Poetry Prize (Inlandia, 2017), Self-Portrait as Rumor and Blood and co-editor with Melissa Sipin of Kuwento: Lost Things, an anthology of Philippine... Read More →
avatar for Saba Syed Razvi

Saba Syed Razvi

Saba Syed Razvi is the author of the Elgin Award-nominated collection In the Crocodile Gardens and the collection heliophobia, which appeared on the preliminary ballot for the Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in Poetry, as well as the chapbooks Limerence & Lux, Of the Divining... Read More →
MR

Margaret Rhee

Margaret Rhee is a poet, artist, and scholar. She is the author of Love Robot, named a 2017 Best Poetry Book by Entropy Magazine, and winner of the Science Fiction Poetry Association Elgin Award and the Asian American Studies Book Prize in Poetry. Her chapbooks include Yellow (Tinfish... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
DISC-061 Auditorium 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

Whereby the Present Haunts Itself
Our panel will deploy and present a range of at once resonant and contextually divergent aesthetic practices for radicalizing inheritance. The panelists work through text, performance, installation, memory experiments, political demonstration, and private everyday rite to communicate through the charged palimpsests of ancestral corridors, historical materials (voices, objects, memory, citizenship, routes of flight), and the violence of muted and instrumentalized collective narratives. In excess of the often empty and naturalized spectacle of challenging the present to be haunted by its history, we are specifically attempting to participate rather in more vulnerable practices required by ongoing catastrophe, whereby the present haunts itself.

YANARA FRIEDLAND will reflect on her book-in-progress, Book of the Sleepless, and its composition in somnambular spaces to think through circular hauntings, remnants, lost memories, and traces of the dead that accumulate in cities and bodies.

TOM HAVIV will discuss tools for activating political imagination for Palestine/Israel, the poetics of post-nation and binationalism, and the power of Mizrahi poetics (futurism and pessimism) in the 21st century. He will focus on the relationship his book, A Flag of No Nation, has to its multimodal outcomes and engagements, from performance work to political and community organizing to oral history and the archive.

KRISTINA LEE PODESVA will read a text on the arrangement that was her father—a traumatized veteran—and her relationship to it/him through an archaeology of artifacts (photo albums, papers, and correspondence) to ask what heavy matters are in life that evaporate with death, and then, what is left?

ROBERT YERACHMIEL SNIDERMAN will frame and moderate, starting from his performance work on walking aesthetics and ethnocide.

JANE WONG will read and perform acts of radical altar-making from her forthcoming manuscript, How to Not Be Afraid of Everything, honoring her family's experience with hunger and growing up in a Chinese American restaurant.

Speakers
avatar for Yanara Friedland

Yanara Friedland

Yanara Friedland is a German-American writer and translator. Her first book Uncountry: A Mythology was the winner of the 2015 Noemi Press Fiction award and is forthcoming in German translation with Mattes & Seitz. She is the recipient of research grants from the DAAD and Arizona Commission... Read More →
avatar for Tom Haviv

Tom Haviv

Jewish Currents
Tom Haviv is a writer, educator, multimedia artist, and organizer based in Brooklyn and born in Israel. A Flag of No Nation is his debut book of poetry. Tom’s work has been published and performed internationally. He is the founder & designer of the Hamsa Flag project, which has... Read More →
avatar for Robert Yerachmiel Sniderman

Robert Yerachmiel Sniderman

PhD Student, Simon Fraser University
Robert Yerachmiel Sniderman is a poet, performance and visual artist. He has written, orchestrated, and performed in many experimental plays, participatory and solo actions. His most recent work, a six-month durational performance, Lost in Jüdischer Friedhof Weißensee, will be... Read More →
avatar for Jane Wong

Jane Wong

Jane Wong's poems can be found in Best American Poetry 2015, American Poetry Review, POETRY, AGNI, New England Review, and others. Her essays have appeared in McSweeney's, Black Warrior Review, Ecotone, The Georgia Review, Shenandoah, and This is the Place: Women Writing About Home... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
UW1-030 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

Following the Thread: Thinking and Making
How do thinking, making, and materiality converge and disparage one another?  How is making art following a thread, literally and metaphorically?  These three writers and artists find in thread and threading a mesh of creativity and present their work and talk about it. Jeanne Heuving in “Making Mood Indigo” explores her compulsion in this prose and poetry piece to write of the material practice of constituting indigo dye from the indico plant and of dying cloth, although she had done neither.  She meditates about what it was in the writing of Mood Indigo that made her wish to blue her fingers and push dye into the weave of a cloth. Maria Damon “Textile: Text, Texture, Ur-text, Sub-Text” explores her weaving as “asemic writing” and her cross-stitch as visual poetry.  She thinks about how writers and scholars use of textile languages (weaving, knitting, spinning, sewing, quilting, among others) can obscure the historical / material relations between these two technologies.  As scholar, writer, and textile maker Damon considers the uses of these vocabularies in very different practices and how etymologies both blur the binary and heal the division between text and textile. Julie Patton in “Riffing Threads, Wires, Rays, Paths, Worlds, Whorls” presents her installation and word art.  She writes that art comes from the discarded, the hungry ghost of all that’s trying to emerge.  She does not search and then create, but rather sorts out and through the material of existence, stuff of daily life. There is the taking care of main tenance—dwelling—lineage and inheritance.

Speakers
MD

Maria Damon

Maria Damon teaches poetry, poetics and literature at Pratt Institute of Art. She is the author of several books of poetry scholarship and chapbooks of cross-stitch visual poetry, co-author (with mIEKAL aND, Jukka-Pekka Kervinen, Adeena Karasick and Alan Sondheim) of several books... Read More →
JH

Jeanne Heuving

Jeanne Heuving’s recent critical books are The Transmutation of Love and Avant-Garde Poetics published in the Modern and Contemporary Poetics Series at the University of Alabama Press and the essay collection, Inciting Poetics: Thinking and Writing Poetry, co-edited with Tyrone... Read More →
JE

Julie Ezelle Patton

code warp, Bullwinky
Julie Ezelle Patton is a permaculturist, poet, performer, artist, and sculptor. Her poetics take the form of scrolls, extended texts, limited edition work, performances, and site-specific installations. Patton's performance work emphasizes improvisation, collaboration, and otherworldly... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
DISC-162 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

Imagining the Anthropocene
How do we survive and extend care to living and non-living entities within precarious conditions? Three panelists reimagine our networked existence in the Anthropocene.

Model organisms are “species chosen because they are amenable to laboratory research and suitable for the study of a range of biological problems.” Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory’s three-volume manual Emerging Model Organisms introduces a “new generation of model organisms and provide[s] a diverse catalog of potential species useful for extending research in new directions.” Kanika Agrawal’s “(e)merging model organisms” adapts concepts, protocols, and language from the CSHL manual to explore the biological/ecological and ontological problems of being/acting human in a world shared with many other humans and organisms. Through experimentation and speculation in sound, image, and movement inspired by model organisms, Agrawal speculates other ways of living for present and future generations.

Bill Basquin’s “From Inside of Here” is a manuscript and film-in-progress that emerged from field research in the Gila National Forest of New Mexico. The project evinces multiple methodologies – writing, camping, sensory attunement, spatial composition, embodiment practices, and thinking of individual life as part of a community. Following the realization that there could be cameras anywhere—because of the hunters and various government surveys of wildlife populations—Basquin turns the camera on the self, in a “naked gesture” about the panopticon, transgendered embodiment, and human reliance on the visual.

Steve Tomasula will read from his novel, Ascension, a story told from the end of our version of Nature: a story of Nature as it was; and is; and might become. His panel "Ascension, Or, Nature as a Medium" attempts to re-imagine the book in terms of thing-theory, or new materialism, incorporating the materials from three eras—the time just before Darwin changes human nature; the digital revolution of the 1980s; and today—as part of its narrative. He explores the ways in which we continually remake the world in our own image and are in turn remade by the new nature we’ve created.

Speakers
KA

Kanika Agrawal

Kanika Agrawal is an Indian citizen and hybrid specimen developed across six countries on four continents. She studied biology at MIT, where she came to love restriction enzymes and fluorescent labeling. She earned an MFA in Writing from Columbia University and a PhD in English/Creative... Read More →
avatar for Bill Basquin

Bill Basquin

Artist
Bill Basquin is a multi-modal artist with an interest in sensory attunement and long-distance walking. Bill enjoys the lessons that come from attending to worlds both wild and domestic. Bill’s films have been shown at the Mix Experimental Queer Film Festival, the Sundance Film Festival... Read More →
avatar for Steve Tomasula

Steve Tomasula

Professor, University of Notre Dame
Steve Tomasula is the author of the novels The Book of Portraiture (FC2), IN & OZ (U Chicago), and VAS: An Opera in Flatland (U Chicago), the novel of the bio-tech revolution. He is also the author of the e-novel TOC: A New-Media Novel, which received the Mary Shelly Award for Excellence... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
UW1-051 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

CANCELLED—bodies of light. ensue
bodies of light. ensue is a collaborative project situated within the failure of language.  The project is a joint effort by writer Niko Lazetic and butoh dancer Julie Dind; it is primarily an attempt to, by breakage, suggest and articulate a hopeful intimacy that holds together different layers of alienation.

The text – a poetic fragmentation of the self’s given points – is an encounter with statelessness and difference, inasmuch as these terms can envelop the condition of existing within multiple temporalities at once. Drifting in and out of languages – English dissolving into cinders of Serbo-Croatian – the poem explores displacement not as a form of removal, but as state of being excluded from within. The speaker is not concerned with revealing a single truth or unweaving the origin of violence; she is well aware that languages, apart yet intertwined, are forms of violence. Refusing to say, mean or express, the dance explores what the French poet and educator Fernand Deligny defined as the “place that is not the place of saying.” It represents an Autistic attempt to reclaim movements as more than mere placeholders for language and expression, to reclaim the right for gestures to say nothing and mean nothing, but simply move.

Dind & Lazetic seek symbiosis beyond ‘meaning’; their ritual of understanding does not seek witnesses but demands the empowering empathy of wit[h]ness. The project is invested in eroding terminology and challenging the ways we hear/see/experience ‘the other’, memorialize trauma, and replicate anger; it seeks to counter conflict by imposing radical tenderness that is a response to being ‘held prisoner’ by the origin, as well as receiving cultures.

Speakers
JD

Julie Dind

Julie Dind is a PhD student in Theatre Arts and Performance Studies at Brown University. Her work, located at the intersection of performance studies and disability studies, aims to explore Autistic modes of performance. She has dedicated the past ten years to learning butoh. Since... Read More →
NL

Nikolina Lazetic

Nikolina Lazetic earned her MFA in Literary Arts at Brown University, and is, as of fall 2019, a doctoral student in the department of Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature at the University of Minnesota. Her work, situated at the intersection of several creative and academic... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
UW2-021 Dance Studio 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

WITH WAVES: A Collaborative Performance
WITH WAVES, an interactive collaboration hosted by Red Rover Series, will involve any writers at the &NOW festival who wish to participate.  Our goals are to foster innovative forms, aesthetic solidarities, and a multifarious performance with this year’s &NOW community so all have the opportunity to improvise in live space and time together.
  1. Anyone can read or perform during this event.  All are welcome to participate! 
  2. Enter the center of the room & read one to three lines of writing at a time.
  3. Briefly overlap your lines with other performers.
  4. After reading your lines, perform a small & quiet gesture anywhere.  Sit & repeat the cycle.  We are creating waves of language & moments of calm.
  5. You may enter & exit the performance at any moment.  There will be several people reading & negotiating the performance simultaneously.  You may enter & exit multiple times in a sequence of repeating waves.
***************************************************************************************************
Red Rover Series {readings that play with reading} is curated by Laaura Goldstein and Jennifer Karmin in Chicago, IL. Founded in 2005, the over one hundred events have featured a diversity of renowned creative minds. Each event is designed as a reading experiment with participation by local, national, and international writers, artists, and performers. Red Rover Series has also presented ensembles of writers improvising together at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the MLA conference, AWP, and the New Orleans Poetry Festival.

Speakers
avatar for Harold Abramowitz

Harold Abramowitz

Charles R. Drew University
Harold Abramowitz’s books include Blind Spot, Not Blessed, Dear Dearly Departed, and Man’s Wars And Wickedness: A Book of Proposed Remedies & Extreme Formulations for Curing Hostility, Rivalry, & Ill-Will (with Amanda Ackerman). Harold co-edits the short-form literary press eohippus... Read More →
avatar for Toby Altman

Toby Altman

Toby Altman is the author of Arcadia, Indiana (Plays Inverse, 2017) and several chapbooks, including Every Hospital by Bertrand Goldberg (Except One), winner of the 2018 Ghost Proposal Chapbook Prize. His poems can or will be found in Gulf Coast, jubilat, Lana Turner, and other journals... Read More →
CC

cris cheek


cris cheek is a documentary performance writer, sound composer and photographer. They worked alongside Bob Cobbing and Bill Griffiths with the Consortium of London Presses to run a thriving open access print shop for poets. In 1981 they co-founded a collective movement-based performance... Read More →
avatar for Brad Gallagher

Brad Gallagher

PhD student, Intermedia Art, Writing and Performance, University of Colorado, Boulder
Brad Gallagher's practice revolves around writing, coding, sound and new media with a focus on how information as a material intersects these different mediums. He has had a lifelong interest in how simple rules give rise to complex behavior, how order arises from chaos and how systems... Read More →
avatar for Kenning JP Garcia

Kenning JP Garcia

Kenning JP García is an antipoet and diarist. Kenning has a BA in linguistics from SUNY Albany where xe studied several dead languages. Xe is the author of the notvel OF (What Place Meant) along with several speculative epics. In addition, xe is an editor at Rigorous, Five 2 One... Read More →
avatar for Ian Hatcher

Ian Hatcher

Free Agent, The American Precariat
Ian Hatcher is a writer, vocalist, programmer, and performance artist whose work focuses on human/machine entanglement. His books and records include Prosthesis (Poor Claudia); Drone Pilot (cOsmOsmOse); Colony (ESPTV); and Abra, a conjoined artists' book and generative poetry app... Read More →
avatar for Marcy Rae Henry

Marcy Rae Henry

Marcy Rae Henry is a Latina born and raised in Mexican-America/The Borderlands. Her work has received a Chicago Community Arts Assistance Grant and an Illinois Arts Council Fellowship. Recent publications include writing and visual art in Newcity, FlowerSong Books’ Selena Anthology... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Karmin

Jennifer Karmin

Curator, Red Rover Series
Jennifer Karmin’s multidisciplinary work has transpired at festivals, artist-run spaces, and on city streets across the U.S., Cuba, Japan, Kenya, and Europe. Her performances have been featured at venues such as the Poetry Project, the Walker Art Center, Los Angeles Contemporary... Read More →
CO

Cy Ozgood

Cy Ozgood is a queer poet, performance artist and witch currently living in Wisconsin. They are the author of several chapbooks including Girl Tramp (horse less press, 2016) and Day (MOLD Editions, 2018). They hold a B.A. in text and media arts from The Evergreen State College and... Read More →
avatar for Deborah Poe

Deborah Poe

Deborah Poe is the author of the poetry collections keep (Dusie Press), the last will be stone, too (Stockport Flats), Elements (Stockport Flats), and Our Parenthetical Ontology (CustomWords), as well as a novella in verse, Hélène (Furniture Press). Her writing has appeared in journals... Read More →
MT

Matt Trease

Matt Trease is an artist, poet, IT Analyst, and astrologer living in south Seattle, WA, where he serves on the board of the Seattle Poetics Lab (SPLAB) and co-curates the Margin Shift reading series. His poems have recently appeared in small po[r]tions, WordLitZine, Phoebe, Fact-Simile... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
DISC-252 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

Paris: Climate Crisis Chopped & Screwed—Process Discussion
Jennifer Calkins and Anne de Marcken will reflect on their process for Paris: Chipped & Screwed, the durational performance of climate crisis from 9:00-2:30 in the UW Bothell Codex. More broadly they will invite a discussion about interdisciplinary responses to the social and environmental crises. Calkins is a writer, an evolutionary biologist, and an attorney; de Marcken is an interdisciplinary artist, a writer, and founder of The 3rd Thing Press. They each work across disciplines, occupying the haunted institutional and intimate spaces at the intersection of environmental and social justice. 

Speakers
JC

Jennifer Calkins

Jennifer Calkins is a writer, attorney and evolutionary biologist. Her academic credentials include a Ph.D. in biological science, an M.F.A. in creative writing and a J.D. in law. Between 2010 and 2015 she produced The Quail Diaries, an interdisciplinary project melding science and... Read More →
avatar for Anne de Marcken

Anne de Marcken

Anne de Marcken is an interdisciplinary artist and writer. Her credits include durational writing projects, hybrid narratives, short and feature-length films and videos, and multi-disciplinary installations. She approaches creative work as a process of critical inquiry and radical... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
UW1-121 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

3:00pm

CANCELLED—Precarious Embodiment: Provocations in Trans/Gendered Justice
Five years after Time Magazine announced “The Transgender Tipping Point” by featuring Laverne Cox on its cover, transgender and gender nonconforming people find themselves in heightened states of both visibility and precarity. These changes are distributed unevenly across transgender and gender nonconforming populations, with the brunt of structural and physical violence continuing to affect Black and Latinx transwomen.

In this session of creative/queer-theoretical praxis, we invite participants of all genders to write into the relations and tensions among visibilities and precarities as we seek trans/gendered justice. We ask: what happens if we open up gender by rewriting it again and again through our embodied subject positions, such as skin tone, place/space, citizenships and belongings, and access to social and financial capital? What alliances form and dissolve, and how can we work through the ephemeral and concrete realities of gender to create narratives and anti-narratives that challenge and affirm?

There will be (2) components to this workshop.

1. A small-group consciousness-raising exercise examining complimentary and diverging concepts in gender and justice through short texts from various disciplines: posthumanist queer theory, poetry, creative/experimental essay, scientific feminist criticism, crip theory, and conflict analysis and resolution.

2. Writing provocations from presenters ask participants to explore, in any genres or queering of genres, their own complexified visions of gender, community, and justice. Our interdisciplinary writing prompts will draw upon, for example:
a. Narrative conflict resolution and the use of genre-specific restorying
b. Poems and experimental work by transgender and gender nonconforming writers
c. Modes of comedy for educational communication
d. Somatic and affective experiential healing

Sign up by adding to your SCHED.

Speakers
avatar for Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher is a poet and essayist and the author of Late Morning When the World Burns (The Cultural Society, 2019). In its explorations of race, neurodivergence, class, and queerness, her work inhabits the anguished affects around privilege and marginalization. Originally from... Read More →
MK

Mel Kutner

Mel Kutner is a transgender graduate student in Educational Theory and Practice at The University of Georgia. Mel also has a Master’s degree in Conflict Analysis and Resolution.


Saturday September 21, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm
UW1-060 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

4:15pm

4:30pm

Bookfair—Open Books: A Poem Emporium
The bookfair is moving to Mobius Hall in anticipation of the evening keynote.
All titles will be available for sale.

You are welcome to pick up your consigned book copies at this event. They will also be available on Sunday at the bookfair from 10:45am–1pm.

Any books not picked up will be considered donations to the University Library at University of Washington Bothell / Cascadia Community College.

Saturday September 21, 2019 4:30pm - 7:00pm
Mobius Hall Theater 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

4:45pm

Keynote Reading & Conversation with Nathaniel Mackey, Introduction by Jeanne Heuving
Keynote book sales will open at 4:30pm.

Nathaniel Mackey is the author of six books of poetry, the most recent of which is Blue Fasa (New Directions, 2015); an ongoing prose work, From a Broken Bottle Traces of Perfume Still Emanate, whose fifth and most recent volume is Late Arcade (New Directions, 2017); and two books of criticism, the most recent of which is Paracritical Hinge: Essays, Talks, Notes, Interviews (University of Iowa Press, 2018). He is the editor of the literary magazine Hambone and coeditor, with Art Lange, of the anthology Moment’s Notice: Jazz in Poetry and Prose (Coffee House Press, 1993). His honors include the National Book Award for poetry, the Stephen Henderson Award from the African American Literature and Culture Society, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize from the Poetry Foundation, the Bollingen Prize for American Poetry from the Beinecke Library at Yale University, and the Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Poetry Prize from the Library of Congress.  He is the Reynolds Price Professor of Creative Writing at Duke University.

Speakers
avatar for Nathaniel Mackey

Nathaniel Mackey

Nathaniel Mackey is the author of six books of poetry, the most recent of which is Blue Fasa (New Directions, 2015); an ongoing prose work, From a Broken Bottle Traces of Perfume Still Emanate, whose fifth and most recent volume is Late Arcade (New Directions, 2017); and two books... Read More →


Saturday September 21, 2019 4:45pm - 6:15pm
Mobius Hall Theater 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

6:15pm

Reception
Please join us for a reception and marathon reading featuring conference participants! The evening kicks off with a musical performance by Imre Lodbrog et sa Petite Amie (Sébastien Régnier and Barbara Browning) and is followed by  a rapid-fire session in which each speaker may read 1 piece with a maximum duration of 1 minute.

A light dinner with food by That Brown Girl Cooks! will be provided. Gluten free and vegan options will be available.

View the complete line-up here.


Saturday September 21, 2019 6:15pm - 10:30pm
Mobius Hall Theater 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

7:00pm

Marathon reading kick-off: Imre Lodbrog et sa Petite Amie (Sébastien Régnier and Barbara Browning)
An evening of readings kicks off with a musical set by Imre Lodbrog et sa Petite Amie (Sébastien Régnier and Barbara Browning).

Imre Lodbrog et Sa Petite Amie are a cabaret rock duo.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Browning

Barbara Browning

Barbara Browning teaches in the Department of Performance Studies at NYU. She’s the author of three academic books (Samba: Resistance in Motion, Infectious Rhythm: Metaphors of Contagion and the Spread of African Culture, and Caetano Veloso: A Foreign Sound) as well as three ficto-critical... Read More →
SR

Sébastien Régnier

Sébastien Régnier is an author, screenwriter and singer/songwriter who performs as a musician under the name Imre Lodbrog. With Barbara Browning, he is the author of Who the Hell is Imre Lodbrog... Read More →



Saturday September 21, 2019 7:00pm - 7:20pm
Mobius Hall Theater 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

7:30pm

Marathon reading continues
Please join us for a marathon reading by &Now participants. Each reader takes the stage for 1 minute or less in this convergence of words.

Reception continues throughout the evening with a light dinner by That Brown Girl Cooks! in Mobius Hall.

Details at our website.

7:30-8:30
  • Jared Leising (Emcee)
  • Samuel Ace
  • Sara Akant
  • Will Alexander
  • Anida Yoeu Ali
  • Ashna Ali
  • Toby Altman
  • Mary-Kim Arnold
  • Mildred Kiconco Barya
  • Zack Brown
  • Laynie Browne
  • Sarah A. Chavez
  • Ching-In Chen
  • Rachelle Cruz
  • Michelle Detorie
  • Noam Dorr
  • Laura Dunn
  • Brad Gallagher
  • Kenning Jean-Paul García
  • Ananya Garg
  • Susan Gevirtz
  • Judith Goldman
  • Marcy Rae Henry
  • Jeanne Heuving
  • Jennifer Karmin
  • Benjamin Krusling
  • Rachel Linn
  • Nina Mamikunian
  • CJ Martin
  • Deborah Meadows
  • Bianca Messinger
  • Sarah Minor
  • Robert Mittenthal
  • Gillian Osborne
  • Siloh Radovsky
  • Sarah Rosenthal
  • Linda Russo
  • Purvi Shah
  • Sun Yung Shin
  • Cole Swensen
  • Steve Tomasula
  • Laura Vena
  • Divya Victor
  • Chelsea Werner-Jatzke
  • Cori A. Winrock


8:30-9:30
  • Ashley Noelle (Emcee)
  • Vidhu Aggarwal
  • Ali Araghi
  • John Beer
  • Mairéad Byrne
  • Jennifer Calkins
  • Denise Calvetti Michaels
  • Julie Carr
  • Amy Catanzano
  • cris cheek
  • Gabrielle Civil
  • Anne de Marcken
  • Simon Eales
  • Tod Edgerton
  • Carlito Espudo
  • Joel Felix
  • Shamala Gallagher
  • Emma Gomis
  • Ian Hatcher
  • Stefania Heim
  • Chris Martin
  • Michael Mejia
  • Sawako Nakayasu
  • Deven Philbrick
  • Bailey Pittenger
  • Emma Rayward
  • Lauren Russell
  • Janet Sarbanes
  • Davis Schneiderman
  • Mady Schutzman
  • Jo Stewart
  • Sarah Tavis
  • Adam Tedesco
  • Orchid Tierney
  • Edwin Torres
  • Rodrigo Toscano
  • Reinetta Vaneendenburg
  • Jessie Weaver
  • Quintan Ana Wikswo
  • Amie Zimmerman

9:30-10:30
  • Woogee Bae (Emcee)
  • Katherine Agard
  • Tamiko Beyer
  • Teresa Carmody
  • S. Brook Corfman
  • Brent Cox
  • Piper Daugharty
  • Zhang Er)
  • Cate Gable
  • Tracy Jane Gregory
  • Rob Halpern
  • Eric Howerton
  • Jenne Hsien Patrick
  • Joel Katelnikoff
  • William Lessard
  • Corbin Louis
  • Nadine Maestas
  • Adam Malinowski
  • Christina Milletti
  • Paul Nelson
  • Emily Oomen
  • Milvia Salvatierra Pacheco
  • Reema Rajbanshi
  • Katie Schaag
  • Jordan Scott
  • Anne Lesley Selcer
  • Travis Sharp
  • Rosie Stockton
  • Te Titus
  • Matthew Trease
  • Daniel Uncapher
  • Joanna Valente



Saturday September 21, 2019 7:30pm - 10:30pm
Mobius Hall Theater 18428 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011
 
Sunday, September 22
 

8:30am

8:30am

Registration
The registration table will be available on the second floor of Discovery Hall. Come and pick up your program, badge, and other materials.

Sunday September 22, 2019 8:30am - 10:45am
DISC-152 Makerspace 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

Blue Monologue
“One feels his two-ness, —an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.” –W. E. B. DuBois, “Striving of the Negro People.”

Blue Monologue is a video triptych. In it, an “American” and a “Negro” dispassionately observe a third, centered, figure. The outermost two are differentiated only by their apparel—one dressed as a lay person, the other in an ambiguous blue uniform.

Both attempt to “place” the center figure, also in uniform, who grooves soulfully to inaudible music. Together, they consider: is she insufficiently identifying as “blue” (American) by over identifying as black? Or does the blue uniform thwart her claim on the darker color?

Although alone in her unadorned room, the center figure moves self-consciously into and out of the frame, seemingly captured by the unrelenting double gaze. By dancing, she investigates her sovereignty—as a diasporic black woman and an American—while the adjacent two look on, their frames spliced intermittently with inter-titles, chronicling and scrutinizing every facet of her form.

Throughout, all three figures are illuminated by a television’s blue light. The blinking glow reminds the audience of a network of audiences; those two adjacent surveyors are now, also, subjects of surveillance.

In image, movement, and text, Blue Monologue asks: how do we “feel [her] two-ness”? Or rather, how do we use intersections of race, gender, class, and nationality to better see one another without reinforcing prisons of identity?




Speakers
JS

Jo Stewart

Jo Stewart is a movement-theater artist, poet, and educator. She uses a combination of gesture, voice, and improvisational scores to make work that meets notions of blackness with queered mythologies. She has previously been an artist in residence at Azule (2019), the Old American... Read More →
LE

Lyndsay Ellis Bloom

Lyndsay Ellis Bloom (b. Florida, USA) is a filmmaker and artist working in experimental cinema and film installation. Bloom’s process involves putting media archeology into practice, investigating the physical properties of celluloid film, and considering intersections between the... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 8:30am - 12:00pm
DISC-165B 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

8:30am

Breathe the Machine
The FaaS were future-oriented. Every day, they contemplated the question: what kind of ancestor will you be?

Prose writer Teresa Carmody, new media artist Matt Roberts, 3-D animator Dengke Chen, and poet Terri Witek will repurpose computers in an existing Bothell lab to respond to human breath. Each transformation will become part of a larger story built from the computers’ individual data--every breath will both create an onscreen reaction (individual computers) and change an animated world just to one side of our own (projected on large screen/wall) . Participants will move from computer to computer and breath by breath build a world that unfolds on the room’s large screen. Simple biological actions, then, will momentarily converge human and mechanical worlds.

Their conceiving mind quit avoiding their body; their body, they realized, had already FaaD.

Donna Haraway is just one theorist who argues that as we acquire more mechanical parts, and as technology takes on increasingly human functions, we should become more actively hopeful about interspecies interactions. Breathe the Machine challenges us to think of even anonymous, institutionally controlled screens as partners in new, combinatory narratives that converge technology and the human into non-hostile, resilient allies. A computer lab, then, becomes an interactive installation, an archive, a fiction, a world and a landscape. A prompt.

This is how we morph.

Speakers
TC

Teresa Carmody

Teresa Carmody is the author of Maison Femme: a fiction (2015) and Requiem (2005). Her work has appeared in The Collagist, Big Fiction, Two Serious Ladies, St. Petersburg Review, Faultline, Entropy, and more. Carmody is co-founding editor of Les Figues Press, an imprint of LARB Books... Read More →
DC

Dengke Chen

Dengke Chen is currently Assistant Professor of Digital Arts, Stetson University, Florida. His practice concentrates on new media art, 3D animation, computer games, and comic art. Unlike the single narrative storytelling techniques used in traditional animations to amuse and entertain... Read More →
MR

Matt Roberts

Associate Professor of Digital Art, Stetson Univeristy
Matt Roberts is a new media artist whose work has been featured internationally and nationally, including shows in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Italy, Mexico, Portugal, Scotland, Taiwan, and nationally in New York, San Francisco, Miami, and Chicago. His work has been featured... Read More →
avatar for Terri Witek

Terri Witek

Terri Witek is the author of 6 books of poems, most recently The Rape Kit (2018), winner of the Slope Editions Prize judged by Dawn Lundy Martin. She has collaborated with visual artists throughout her career: works with Brazilian visual artist Cyriaco Lopes include gallery shows... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 8:30am - 12:00pm
UW2-121 Digital Media Lab 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Multimodal Convergence: Situating Activist Poetics Through Multimodal Collaboration
How do multimodal poetics and collaborations converge with social activism? How do they create unexpected coalitions and healing through expanding performance and digital arts platforms? This panel looks at multimodal poetics as explicitly collaborative work responsive to increasing social division. At the convergence point between art form and artist, we see political hope emergent in sustained collaborations between backgrounds (QTPOC/queer/South Asian/Cuban-American communities) and craft (game design/virtual reality/spoken word/music composition). We posit that coalition-building functions across these spaces precisely because of their dependence on cross-arts and cross-discipline collaboration. These convergences include:

1. Two collaborators (VR Designer Aaron Holloway and Visual Artist Jordan Havlicek) on a VR Poetry game created with a cohort of poets, wherein participants can build, draw, write, and visit politically mediated identity;
2. Twitter poetry (Visual Artist and Performer Jan Okemgbo) spliced with video game playing footage, which is produced in open access media as a video poetry;
3. Two collaborators – (Poet Dr. Patrick Milian and Composer Emerson Eads) – on the song cycle they produced in the ambiguous space between art song and chamber opera on queer love resisting binaristic social formations, The Gleaners; and,
4. A spoken word poetry performance and discussion (Poet and Performer Ananya Garg) on navigating South Asian and queer identity as collaboratively negotiated between performer and audience.

Finally, to situate the seven speakers and their four hybrid performances and discussions, the panel host (C. R. Grimmer) will frame the conversation and suggest audience engagement. This framing comes out of the panel host’s own the conversation through their research on activist poetry and related multimodal poetics from the 1960’s to the present, and their framing questions will ask how contemporary digital and public arts coalitions create historically grounded spaces for building necessary, emergent worlds of activist poetics.

Speakers
EE

Emerson Eads

As a composer and conductor, Dr. Emerson Eads has devoted himself to music of social concern. His Mass for the Oppressed, a setting of the Ordinary of the Mass featuring textual interpolations by his brother Evan Eads, and a Credo adapted from the diary of Pope Francis before his... Read More →
AG

Ananya Garg

Ananya Garg is a young queer Indian poet and spoken word performance artist who sees her QTPOC arts community as a central force in her healing process. She has appeared in Tasveer's 2018 Yoni Ki Baat, directed by Uma Rao, Tasveer's Subcontinental Drift, and Yoni Ki Baat 2018 in San... Read More →
avatar for C. R. Grimmer

C. R. Grimmer

Lecturer, The University of Washington
C. R. Grimmer (she/her/they/them) is a poet, scholar, and lecturer on the UW Seattle and Bothell campuses with an MFA, MA, and PhC. They host and produce The Poetry Vlog (TPV). Supported through an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship and Jack Straw Artist Support Fellowship, TPV... Read More →
AH

Aaron Holloway

Aaron Holloway (presenting with Jordan Havlicek) is an alumni Computer Science student here at the University of Washington's Bothell campus. Software development is my profession, and virtual/augmented reality is my passion. In his coursework, he explored the use of these technologies... Read More →
PM

Patrick Milian

Patrick Milian is a David A. Robertson Fellow, doctoral candidate, and teacher at the University of Washington where he also received his MFA. He has been a William Ralph Wayland Fellow, the recipient of a grant from the Klepser Endowment, and winner of the Richard J. Dunn Teaching... Read More →
JO

Jan Okemgbo

Jan is a student at UW Bothell, majoring in Media and Communications with a minor in Creative Writing. Jan has been exploring different aspects of poetry and social media through making tweets about Nintendo's Splatoon 2 that are melodramatic, combining an affinity for the game and... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
DISC-252 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Hannah Weiner, Wellness, and Critical Archival Praxis
Hannah Weiner, an innovative L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poet, used her unique psychological experience as a foundation for her experimental writing. This panels explores the lessons that can be learned from a deep dive into her papers held in the Archive for New Poetry at the Mandeville Special Collections at UCSD. We want to honor the work of this poet, as well as examine her approach to her schizophrenia (and her quest for wellness) on her own terms in the context of the often-invisibilized frictions between recipients of psychological diagnoses and the structures in place to treat them. We explore the role that her writing practice and her literary community played within that pursuit of wellness, which she traced in a seemingly unmediated manner in her automatic writing practice. Additionally, we are excited about the ways that Weiner developed a narrative form through which to convey her pathologized reality. We approach her work from the vantage of dailiness in her writing practice, her interests in formal rupture, and the role that writing played as a nexus or glue of creative community. What can we learn from Weiner’s practice about using writing to present a reality that rubs up against others’ realities, and how can that be applied to our politically-charged moment? As Patrick Durgin notes, Weiner’s self-identification as clairvoyant “conflates telling and being told.” Using Weiner’s archive as an example, we ask: what role can an archive play in reflecting creative communities and how does an archive serve as an intersection of the past, present, and future? How can an archive embody critical pedagogies and collaborative praxis? We’d like to share what we’ve had access to through the Archive for New Poetry with others who are interested in the relationship between writing, wellness, and political landscapes.

Speakers
NM

Nina Mamikunian

UC San Diego Library
Nina Mamikunian is the Curator for the Archive for New Poetry, as well as the Literature and Theatre & Dance Librarian at UC San Diego. She studied writing at Brown and Indiana University, Bloomington, where she served as editor of the Indiana Review. Her work has been published in... Read More →
avatar for Siloh Radovsky

Siloh Radovsky

MFA Student-UCSD
Siloh Radovsky is pursuing her MFA in Writing at UCSD, and received an interdisciplinary B.A. from the Evergreen State College. She primarily writes personal essays, prose poems, and fiction. Siloh’s research interests include medicine and objectivity, especially the perimeters... Read More →
AT

Adriana Tosun

Adriana Tosun is pursuing her MFA in Writing at UCSD, where she researches narratology, humor, reimagined histories, and diasporic identity. Her work has been installed and performed in London, New York, and San Diego. She is a co-editor of Alchemy Journal of Translation.


Sunday September 22, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW1-121 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Re-Building Realities: Experimental Forms & Formats in Queer Writing
Traditional literary forms often strain to express lived experiences, particularly when those experiences do not conform to collective notions of reality. LGBTQ writers have, throughout history, found ways to convey non-normative experiences through literary experimentation. Our panel will examine techniques used by past and present queer writers to convey our experiences. Specifically, we will explore how alternative literary forms and formats can contribute to hybridity that can assist in re-working and re-building reality. Similar to postmodernists whose work attempted to disassemble hierarchies of authority, the writers we will discuss often work with fragmentation--however, for many of them, there seems to be a stronger desire to create a sense of community and connection through a process of reassembly than is true for most postmodernists. These ways of thinking can be particularly useful for all writers during times of flux, like our present moment, when reality feels destabilized by dysfunctional public discourse, the dismantling of governmental structures, and continuing climate catastrophe.

To provide context and guidance from the past, we will touch on Modernist writing and the way that queer writers of that time used experimental techniques to convey their experiences during an era of uncertainty. Then we will look at contemporary versions of the lyric essay, speculative memoir, and literary fantastic as well as experimental formats like zines, other independent publications, social media, and projects that are unconventionally bound as clothing or other artifacts. These texts may profess love for unusual/ignored things, redefine common terms, tell a true story in the form of a fairytale, or otherwise describe realities overlooked by mainstream publishing. Quite often, the authors attempt to create communities and narratives that they cannot find elsewhere, and it is in these attempts to assemble and connect that their work provides guidance for living with the unknown or the unstable.

Speakers
EB

Elanor Broker

Elanor Broker is a writer and civil rights attorney based in Portland, Oregon. Her work centers on creative non-fiction, with a focus on writing transgender experience, and has appeared in Slate, Catapult, Electric Literature, Gertrude Press, and other publications. She also served... Read More →
RL

Rachel Linn

Rachel Linn writes and illustrates across multiple genres and mediums. Her published writing includes fiction (realist and surreal), nonfiction, and poetry and her visual art merges drawing, printmaking, and needlework techniques. She recently received an Artist Support Grant from... Read More →
avatar for Miranda Schmidt

Miranda Schmidt

Miranda Schmidt is a writer, editor, and teacher whose work has appeared in TriQuarterly, Orion, Catapult, Electric Literature, The Collagist, and other journals. She has taught creative writing at the Loft, the University of Washington, and Portland Community College and edited for... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW1-030 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Shape-shifting Convergence: Conjuring the Feminine Divine, Power, and Creation
Our communities are in need of rituals of healing. Rituals of justice. Rituals of art that liberate. And so, we will enact a ritual that engages diverse lineages of the feminine divine to explore power, mythmaking, diasporic and transnational inheritances, and creation in contemporary writing by women of color.

How can we engage shape-shifting as a lineage, a present possibility, and a tangible future? From re‑shaping origin stories to seeing monstrosity as divinity, we will co-create aesthetics of the feminine divine to foster attention, care, and value for ourselves and marginalized communities. We will explore craft, convergence, worldbuilding, and futurisms of the feminine divine towards liberation – including for communities of color, women, and non-binary folks.

Drawing from our own spiritual traditions, we will Investigate the feminine divine in Afro‑Diasporic, Christian, Hindu, and Korean shamanic cosmologies. Our improvisational ritual will uplift these spiritual lineages, intersecting them with literature, art, performance, and critical analysis by women of color, as well as liberation movements resisting colonialism, homophobia, misogyny, and racism. Centering women of color innovations in craft and sacred storytelling, we will embody how ritual (including art) makes meaning and compels us toward action – and justice. Furthermore, we will converge with the participants – inviting involvement, reflection, and dissonance. In so doing, our ritual convergence will embody coming together without dissolution, sharing voices without erasure or assimilation.

Through connecting our traditions, ancestral wisdoms, and art alongside audience participants, we will enact interdisciplinary practice, movement toward social justice, and embodied healing. Our convergent ritual will not show but do – and be.

Speakers
avatar for Gabrielle Civil

Gabrielle Civil

black feminist performance artist
Gabrielle Civil is a black feminist performance artist, poet, and writer, originally from Detroit, MI. She has premiered fifty original performance art works around the world, including her year-long project “In & Out of Place” as a Fulbright Fellow in Mexico and her “Fugue... Read More →
AL

Ana-Maurine Lara

Ana-Maurine Lara is currently an Assistant Professor of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of Oregon. Her areas of interest include Afro Latino/a identities, black queer aesthetics, Vudú in the Dominican Republic, and Afro-Dominicanidad and the struggle against... Read More →
PS

Purvi Shah

Purvi Shah inspires change as a writer and consultant on gender, racial & economic equity. During the 10th anniversary of 9/11, she directed Together We Are New York, a community-based poetry project highlighting Asian American voices. For her leadership fighting violence against... Read More →
avatar for Sun Yung Shin

Sun Yung Shin

신 선 영 Sun Yung Shin was born in Seoul, Korea, during 박 정 희 Park Chung-hee's military dictatorship, and grew up in the Chicago area. She is the editor of the best-selling anthology A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota, author of poetry collections Unbearable Splendor... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW2-021 Dance Studio 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

The "Several Lives" of Multimedia Texts
A painting can be seen and re-seen in various group shows, a sculpture can move across galleries, and a piece of installation art can morph to feature various site-specific locations, but when a poem, a short story, or an essay gets published in a magazine, that piece is rarely featured in another format. And what do these differing varieties of “publication” across artistic fields suggest for the image-text? What possibilities arrive for the video poem that is allowed to shift as it travels between festivals across the country? Or for a tactile essay that is displayed as an exhibit? What "several lives," for example, will an interactive digital text go on to have as digital platforms evolve?

On this panel, five interdisciplinary writers will talk about what happens when texts take on multiple lives through hybrid modes of publication: stories as performances, poems printed on fabric, essays as installations, and translations in video form. Our conversation will focus on the expansive opportunities available to multimedia literary works in several iterations that both meet and surpass the limits of traditional literary venues and the vocabularies of genre. The final third of our presentation will be devoted to a collaborative how-to for multimedia texts that (wish to) take on several iterations.

Speakers
RC

Raj Chakrapani

Raj Chakrapani lived in Romania, Liberia, Myanmar and received an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. His work is placed or forthcoming in Lana Turner, Speculative City, Word Thug, Sequestrum, Crevice.ro and his video work has appeared in TriQuarterly Review. He currently teaches... Read More →
ND

Noam Dorr

Noam Dorr's debut book, Love Drones, is forthcoming in July 2019 from Sarabande Books. His work has appeared in Gulf Coast, Seneca Review, Passages North, and other places. His essay, "Love Drones," won the Gulf Coast Essay Prize and was a notable essay in the Best American Essays... Read More →
CW

Chelsea Werner-Jatzke

Chelsea Werner-Jatzke is the author of the chapbooks Adventures in Property Management(Sibling Rivalry, 2017) and Thunder Lizard (H_NGM_N, 2016). With artist Douglas Degges, Chelsea is co-creator of Borough Body, a collection of paintings and prose poems that has been presented as... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Minor

Sarah Minor

Assistant Professor of Creative Writing, Cleveland Institute of Art
Sarah Minor is the author of The Persistence of The Bonyleg: Annotated (Essay Press, 2016) and a collection of visual essays forthcoming from Rescue Press (2020). She has exhibited installations of essays at The University of Arizona Historical Society in Tucson, AZ (2014), Blue Mark... Read More →
CA

Cori A. Winrock

Cori A. Winrock's collection, Little Envelope of Earth Conditions, was awarded Editor's Choice for the Alice James Books Prize and is forthcoming in January 2020. Her first book, This Coalition of Bones (Kore Press), received the Freund Prize from Cornell University. She is the winner... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
DISC-162 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

The Veer & the Verge: A Discussion of National Identity, Migration, and Diasporic Convergence in Divya Victor’s CURB
This panel will discuss the making and significance of CURB by Divya Victor, an artists’ book, made through the convergence between documentary poetics and the possibilities of structure and legibility in the handmade book. The book explores how racial and national identities diverge, rupture, and converge in the threshold zones of semi-public spaces—sidewalks, verges, lawns—and in places of quotidian consumption—gas stations, bars, green spaces—which it understands as sites of discipline and surveillance. CURB documents the killing and assault of Indian-Americans and Indian immigrants in post Reagan America through to the Trump era to query how urban spaces defend against the foreign subject so as to mark and claim a pending corpse or carceral entity. This panel will explore convergence as both theme and inter-disciplinary method in the making of CURB, in its iterations as book and multivocal performance. Within the biological sciences, “convergency” names the evolution of superficial characteristics across unrelated species that assists in thriving in a shared environment. As an analogue to naturalization and citizenry, “convergency” can be imagined as assimilative or acculturating linguistic practices, codes, and social negotiation in urban spaces. How do we imagine ourselves as converging and diverging in shared, public spaces? How does “nationhood,” as a production, attempt to manage, curb, or fetishize ongoing cultural convergence through acts of violence? How do these acts unfold in shared public spaces? How might a book’s architecture and facture open multiple layers of reading, challenge oppressive habits of textual engagement and sense-making, and welcome collaboration and convergent peership through reading practices and physical engagement with the book? The panel will consist of four distinct and converging modalities—a reading and presentation of CURB by Divya Victor; a presentation by Aaron Cohick, the book maker and publisher; and critical talks by Serena Chopra and CJ Martin.

Speakers
AC

Aaron Cohick

Aaron Cohick is a letterpress printer/artist/publisher based in Colorado Springs, CO. His work focuses on the intersection of experimental typography/printing, writing, and artists’ publications. He is the founder and proprietor of the NewLights Press and is the Printer of The Press... Read More →
avatar for Divya Victor

Divya Victor

Asst. Prof., Nanyang Technological University
Divya Victor is the author of CURB (Press at Colorado College), KITH (Fence Books/ Book Thug), a book of verse, prose memoir, lyric essay and visual objects; NATURAL SUBJECTS (Trembling Pillow, Winner of the Bob Kaufman Award), UNSUB (Insert Blanc), and THINGS TO DO WITH YOUR MOUTH... Read More →
avatar for CJ Martin

CJ Martin

CJ Martin lives in Colorado Springs, Colorado and is a poet, bookbinder, letterpress printer and sometimes a publicist. He is the author of Two Books (Compline Press, 2010) as well as numerous chapbooks. With Julia Drescher, he publishes poetry and art titles from Further Other Book... Read More →
avatar for Serena Chopra

Serena Chopra

Assistant Faculty, Seattle University
Serena Chopra is a teacher, writer, dancer, filmmaker, soundscape designer and a visual and performance artist. She has a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Denver and an MFA from the University of Colorado at Boulder. She was a 2011-2013 Redline artist-in-residence, a... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW1-010 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

9:00am

Resisting Futurity: An Equinoctial Workshop
The Autumnal Equinox (September 23rd) invites response to the changing season: with the coming of darkness, what needs to/ought to be reseeded and perhaps what needs to be revisioned? In this our era dominated by a promise of “progress” (an interminably productive and reproductive, humancentric futurity) that ensures unbearable growth, ecological destruction, and numerous causalities – the seasonal reprise provokes us to collectively slow in the present and rethink futurity. This workshop will create a space to affectively and intellectually assess modes of sustenance in relation to current dominant structures and life systems, resist capitalocene reproduction, queer temporality and imagine other possible futures. We’ll ask: How can (or do) we swerve out of capitalist (re)productive ideologies? What resilience can we (re)invent? What form of sympoetic creativity can we conjure? We’ll read poems together and write through their pulses to collaborate and create something new – to possibly create a little shift in workings or awareness to bring to one’s own equinox ritual.

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Speakers
avatar for Megan Kaminski

Megan Kaminski

Associate Professor, University of Kansas
Megan Kaminski is a poet and essayist. She is the author of two books of poetry, Deep City (Noemi Press, 2015) and Desiring Map (Coconut Books, 2012), with a third book Gentlewomen forthcoming from Noemi Press (2020). She is an associate professor in the University of Kansas' Graduate... Read More →
avatar for Linda Russo

Linda Russo

Linda Russo’s work engages interspecies landscapes/land use and experiential and ideological geographies. She is the author of several books of poems including Participant (Lost Roads Press, 2016) and Meaning to Go to the Origin in Some Way (Shearsman, 2015). To Think of her Writing... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 9:00am - 10:15am
UW1-060 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:15am

Break
Sunday September 22, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am

10:45am

OPEN SYSTEMS: A Performance in Flux
How do we converge when unsettled? Where can we turn to in the midst of ruin and decay? Our panel will be a two-part experimental performance / reading that questions and explores an environment in constant flux, centering oscillations, ephemerality, and duality over oppositions, permanence, and singular ways of being. Through interrogations of memory and legibility, we ask what is revealed in the overlaps and silences within poems and between bodies, voices, and languages, as well as what possibilities can emerge out of (are lost, due to) our inarticulability and drifting, our unsettlement. Our presentation will recognize gestures, gibberish, silences, and remembering—among other forms of speech—as potential ways of communicating and, with the audience, explore what happens inside an environment of continued unsettlement. Together, how do we imagine futures of connection and possibility? In an open system, all agents are culpable in deciding.

Speakers
avatar for Woogee Bae

Woogee Bae

Woogee Bae is a poet and editor whose work focuses on translingualism and waste. She received her MFA from the University of Washington Bothell, edits the ecopoetics journal Snail Trail, and curates the quarterly reading series Gamut. Her writing can be found in P-QUEUE, Small Po[r]tions... Read More →
ZB

Zack Brown

Zack Brown lives in Buffalo, New York, where he is a PhD candidate in SUNY Buffalo’s poetics program. His book Receipts is available from LUMA/89plus and he is the co-editor, with Dana Venerable, of P-Queue.
KO

Katelyn Oppegard

Katelyn Oppegard is a graduate of UW Bothell's MFA in Creative Writing & Poetics. She is poet who forgets. And questions. All that is certain is that she lives in a van with her dog. Everything else is flux, including her poetry which circles through ephemeral forms and gnaws in the... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 10:45am - 11:20am
UW2-021 Dance Studio 11136 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Ask Not What Poetry Can Do For Video, But What Video Can Do For Poetry
This panel proposes an alternative form: the screening. The moving image on a screen has become dominant in our understanding of reading, writing, and being in the world. Along with creative work, this panel proposes a mode of video-criticism and poetic-making that investigates, articulates, and explores the possible affordances of a thinking of poetry through and with video. The panel will consist of introductory remarks by Courtlin Byrd. Then we will have a screening of 4-5 video works that will play continuously, like a cinema-screening, each exploring the potential of video for both making poetry but also for reading poetry. Following the screening we will have a robust Q&A between the artists and audience teasing out the meaning of this convergence.

Courtlin Byrd and Brent Cox will present a collaborative work suggesting video presents unique opportunities for reading documents of poetry. The video will “read” works by Johanna Drucker and Susan Howe, and The Florentine Codex, a 16th-century colonial-imperial ethnographic study of the Nahuatl people made by Spanish Franciscan friar Bernardino de Sahagun. Poet and video artist Madison McCartha will present portions of “FREAKOPHONE WORLD,” a series of occult recordings, hauntings, and invocations performing new black diasporic identities in the imperiled globalized society, along with an examination of Jeron Braxton’s animation and a proto-essay on blackness, virtuality, assemblage, mediation and art-making. Zak Byrd will screen “Neighbor,” a survey of the homelessness crisis in Los Angeles. From general conversations about the issue, the essay focuses in on Anthony Tolliver, an illustrator who has lived on the streets for 35 years. Corbin Louis will screen “Can of Screams,” a pixel-performance, palpitating artwork cross-bred by warping page poem structures with .mpegs, compositing body, video and sound to activate a blast of agony and healing.

Speakers
CB

Courtlin Byrd

Courtlin Byrd is a multimedia artist, writer, and co-founder of the Topological Poetics Research Institute (TPRI). Hailing from California by way of Tennessee, she is currently a bartender and PhD student in Media Study at SUNY Buffalo. She uses video to explore language and to disrupt... Read More →
ZB

Zak Byrd

Zak Byrd is a filmmaker and poet from Tacoma, Washington who has lived in Los Angeles for a decade. He studied Film and Digital Media at the University of California in Santa Cruz and he is fortunate to live in a rent-controlled apartment.
avatar for Brent Cox

Brent Cox

Brent Cox is co-founder of the Topological Poetics Research Institute (TPRI) and the Ecopoetry Workshop in Bergamo, Italy. He is also a PhD student at the University at Buffalo Poetics Program where his work deals with investigations of surfaces that might be depths, and depths that... Read More →
avatar for Corbin Louis

Corbin Louis

Corbin Louis is a poet and performer from Seattle. At age 13 Corbin found his voice in rap and spoken word. By 2008 he became the Seattle Youth Slam Champion in a citywide competition. He spent the next 15-years in a frenzied haze, recording albums and chopping up videos for the sake... Read More →
MM

Madison McCartha

Madison McCartha is a black poet and multimedia artist whose work appears (or is forthcoming) in Black Warrior Review, The Fanzine, Full-Stop, The Journal, jubilat, Tarpaulin Sky, Yalobusha Review and elsewhere. His work has received support from The Millay Colony, Winter Tangerine... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
DISC-252 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Autotheory and Intersectional Form: Embodiment and the Politics of Hybridity
Autotheory (such as Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts) and intersectional form (Jen Soriano’s descriptor for work such as Lauret Savoy's Trace and Kazim Ali’s Bright Felon) have generated some buzz in the literary world. Both terms describe work that pushes the boundaries of conventional canons, through their expressions of multiple embodied subjectivities and for their innovations in structure and form. This panel will explore the craft and politics of autotheory and intersectional form, and give examples of the artistic and intellectual richness these forms allow.

The literary practice of hybridity—work that blurs categorical lines of artistic medium, academic discipline, or genre—is flourishing. Autotheory and intersectional form are important hybridity approaches that challenge conventional standards of authority. These forms allow for layered work that can shift theory, culture and even worldviews through the assemblage of historically marginalized perspectives. At AWP 2019, a talk that touched on these topics was met with excitement, and we believe there is substantial appetite for further conversation in this area.

Speakers
avatar for Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher

Shamala Gallagher is a poet and essayist and the author of Late Morning When the World Burns (The Cultural Society, 2019). In its explorations of race, neurodivergence, class, and queerness, her work inhabits the anguished affects around privilege and marginalization. Originally from... Read More →
avatar for Jen Soriano

Jen Soriano

Jen Soriano (she/they) is a Filipinx-American writer and musician based in Seattle. She writes lyric essays and performance poetry about the intersections of trauma, health, science, politics, colonization, nature and power. They are the author of "Multiplicity From the Margins... Read More →
avatar for Arianne Zwartjes

Arianne Zwartjes

Faculty, Sierra Nevada College MFA in Creative Writing
Arianne Zwartjes is an essayist/poet and has been teaching writing workshops on autotheory lately. She teaches for the Sierra Nevada College MFA program and is the author of Detailing Trauma: A Poetic Anatomy (U Iowa Press), as well as The Surfacing of Excess (Winner of 2009 Blue... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW1-010 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Grotesquing Gender: Deforming Narrative Now
How do we 'grotesque' gender?

Why might we want to do so in the current moment?

We will explore female monstrosity and the grotesquing of gender in our current moment. While the 19th-century gothic deployed the monstrous feminine to illuminate the dark side of/other to the Victorian ideal of the domestic household angel, in our era, feminine monstrosity has the potential to serve as an explicit form of resistance to *any* stable notion of gender. In poetry, the term 'gurlesque' was coined to describe experimentally bold work that reappropriates the female gothic in a burlesque, witty fashion. What can the novel do differently with this impulse? How do narrative writers deploy monstrosity to interrogate the very notion of the ‘female’ and to render gender itself as grotesque, exorbitant, unstable, unsavory? What new monsters can we unleash?

Diverse in both our identities (sexualities, genders, races, ages, class origins, etc.) and narrative strategies, we will explore points of convergence and divergence in our uses of the grotesque. Each panelist will give a short reading, comment on their work in relation to that of the others, and engage in frank, frisky, and grotesque-y dialogue with one another and the audience.

Speakers
avatar for Aimee Parkison

Aimee Parkison

Associate Professor of Fiction Writing, Oklahoma State University
Aimee Parkison is the author of Refrigerated Music for a Gleaming Woman, which won the FC2 Catherine Doctorow Innovative Fiction Prize. Parkison teaches in the Creative Writing Program at Oklahoma State University and has published five books of fiction.
avatar for Jennifer Natalya Fink

Jennifer Natalya Fink

Georgetown University
Jennifer Natalya Fink is the author of five critically acclaimed novels, including the Dana Award-winning The Mikvah Queen and Lambda-finalist and Doctorow-prize winning Bhopal Dance. She is an associate professor at Georgetown University, where she teaches creative writing and co-founded... Read More →
RB

Rebecca Brown

Rebecca Brown is the author of Not Heaven, Somewhere Else (Tarpaulin Sky Press, 2018) and a dozen earlier titles published in the US and abroad, including American Romances, The Last Time I Saw You, The Dogs, The Terrible Girls (all with City Lights Books), and The Gifts of the Body... Read More →
MD

Michelle Donahue

Michelle Donahue is a PhD candidate in creative writing at the University of Utah. Her fiction has been published in CutBank, Arts & Letters, Sycamore Review, and elsewhere. She is fiction editor for Quarterly West and has an MFA in creative writing & environment from Iowa State... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
DISC-061 Auditorium 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Homing: Rights, Relations and Rituals
There’s no place like home. Home is a point of convergence. Home is a point of contention. Home is appointed, perhaps more often than it is chosen. Who gets to choose? Who gets to come home, and who is sent home? “Go home.” Go home how, and to/with what? For some, home was not left behind but/and cannot be returned to. Home may not be a place to like. Home may not be a place at all. Or, like, there’s no home? There’s no home-like place. No likeness to home in.

In Mobility Justice: The Politics of Movement in an Age of Extremes, Mimi Sheller writes, “Freedom of mobility may be considered a universal human right, yet in practice it exists in relation to class, race, sexuality, gender, and ability exclusions from public space, from national citizenship, from access to resources, and from the means of mobility at all scales. In many ways mobility justice is itself a mobile concept, insofar as it treats justice as an unstable configuration that moves across scales and realms.”

When home becomes a public space—and a public debate—what rights do we have to move to, within and away from it? This panel adopts experimental and performative approaches to consider the (im)mobilities and (in)stabilities of home. The three writers—Indian, Ugandan, and Iranian by origin, and currently based in the US—examine both the public and the private relations and rituals through which home is (un)made. They compare, map, inventory, and (re)call. They do it all over again. Home is redefined. Home changes scale. Home is always and never (un)settled.

Speakers
KA

Kanika Agrawal

Kanika Agrawal is an Indian citizen and hybrid specimen developed across six countries on four continents. She studied biology at MIT, where she came to love restriction enzymes and fluorescent labeling. She earned an MFA in Writing from Columbia University and a PhD in English/Creative... Read More →
avatar for Mildred K Barya

Mildred K Barya

University of Denver
Mildred K Barya is Assistant Professor of creative writing & literature at UNC-Asheville and board member of African Writers Trust (AWT). She has published three poetry books: Give Me Room to Move My Feet (Amalion Publishing), The Price of Memory After the Tsunami (Mallory International... Read More →
PM

Poupeh Missaghi

Poupeh Missaghi is a writer, a translator both into and out of Persian, Asymptote’s Iran editor-at-large, and an educator. She holds a PhD in English-creative writing from the University of Denver and an MA in creative writing from Johns Hopkins University. Her nonfiction, fiction... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW1-030 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Queering Intersectionality | Difference and Convergence
Queering Intersectionality | Difference and Convergence: with, in, also, in addition to, criss-cross, stitch, palimpsest, yes, and. This workshop will offer innovative creative practices to make intersections of identity visible and valuable. Through readings and writing exercises, attendees will awaken and strengthen the conscious recognition of intersections with queerness in relationship to ethnic and racial identity, socio-economic backgrounds and engagement with nature. These writings will be rooted in social justice and will resist insular binaries.

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Speakers
avatar for Ever Jones

Ever Jones

Senior Lecturer, University of Washington Tacoma
Ever Jones is a queer/trans writer, artist & instructor. Their forthcoming poetry collection, nightsong, is a transliberatory lyric, both earthing & unearthing the body from gender, politics & identity. Ever is a Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Washington in Tacoma... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Chavez

Sarah Chavez

University of Washington Tacoma
Sarah A. Chavez, a mestiza born and raised in the California Central Valley, is the author of the poetry collections, Hands That Break & Scar (Sundress Publications, 2017) and All Day, Talking (dancing girl press, 2014), selections of which were awarded the Susan Atefat Peckham Fellowship... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
UW1-060 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011

10:45am

Bookfair—Open Books: A Poem Emporium
This is the last day to purchase books or pick up your copies from Open Books, A Poem Emporium, the offical conference bookseller!

If you are unable to stop by and pick up your books, titles can be returned by mail within three months of the &Now conference if author emails openpoetrybooks@gmail.com requesting titles to be returned by mail and pays shipping costs. Otherwise, any remaining copies will be considered a gift in kind to the bookstore.




Sunday September 22, 2019 10:45am - 1:00pm
DISC-152 Makerspace 11122 NE 180th Street, Bothell, WA 98011

7:00pm

Special Event: Nathaniel Mackey and Marty Ehrlich: A Collaborative Performance
Join Nathaniel Mackey and Marty Ehrlich for a special off-site event after the conference ends.
Nathaniel Mackey has performed his literary work with multiple jazz groups and experimental musicians in partially orchestrated and spontaneous events. Sunday night at Hugo House, Mackey will be engaging in a premiere performance with the woodwind musician Marty Ehrlich. As a multi-instrumentalist, interpreter and improviser, Ehrlich has performed, toured and recorded with a who’s who of contemporary composers.

Speakers
avatar for Nathaniel Mackey

Nathaniel Mackey

Nathaniel Mackey is the author of six books of poetry, the most recent of which is Blue Fasa (New Directions, 2015); an ongoing prose work, From a Broken Bottle Traces of Perfume Still Emanate, whose fifth and most recent volume is Late Arcade (New Directions, 2017); and two books... Read More →
avatar for Marty Ehrlich

Marty Ehrlich

Marty Ehrlich is celebrating over 40 years in the nexus of creative music centered in New York City. He began his musical career in St. Louis, Missouri, performing and recording with the Human Arts Ensemble.  Since coming to New York, he has made thirty recordings of his compositions... Read More →


Sunday September 22, 2019 7:00pm - 8:30pm
Hugo House, Seattle, WA 1634 11th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122